Hot answers tagged

86

Through-the-lens focusing cameras had focusing screens — usually ground glass or fresnel lens (related: What is a focusing screen?). View cameras (the old-style large cameras with bellows) projected the image onto the focus screen. The photographer directly inspected the image on the focusing screen (perhaps using a loupe to magnify areas of the image), ...


74

A picture is worth a thousand words, here. This is a Twin Lens Reflex camera: The two lenses are linked together so they focus as a set (either the whole front panel moves, or the lenses are linked by gears so that they turn together to focus). The top lens — the "viewing lens" — has a mirror which bounces the view to the ground-glass viewfinder. The bottom ...


63

Is there any significant benefit to having an SLR mechanism in a digital camera? Particularly in terms of a benefit that's large enough to make up for the liability of adding a mechanical part into a design where a solid-state alternative is available? Yes. Response speed for both autofocus and shutter release. The mirrorbox has a number of side ...


54

There are at least four reasons. Resolution First, although the same sensor may be used, video generally uses only a portion of it (either by skipping lines or some more sophisticated method). 4K UHD video is the equivalent of about 8 megapixels. Most DSLRs these have three or four times the pixel count, and many have even more. That means it's possible to ...


54

Single lens means that there is only one lens attached to the camera at once. This is to distinguish it from a twin-lens reflex camera, which has two lenses - one used for the viewfinder and one used for actually taking the photo.


53

And with a digital camera, you don't need a hinged mirror as you can show the user exactly what light will be captured by just routing the sensor output to an LCD display. This is the reason for the rise in popularity of mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras (MILC). Without the mirror box, the camera can be smaller, lighter, less expensive, etc. Having ...


49

I'm just terrified that if I make one wrong move, a hair or a piece of dust could fall in there, and then the camera will be irreparably damaged and I'll never be able to use it again. Fear not, young Padawan. Those of us who regularly use dSLRs can attest that simply having dust or hair fall into your dSLR body will NOT irreparably damage anything, and you ...


47

Hardware ISO control exists to amplify the signal before readout to maximise the signal to noise ratio. Without read noise you wouldn't need ISO if you had a high precision ADC as you could simply shoot everything at the native sensitivity, and if the image was too dark just apply digital gain (multiply the pixel values). It's easy to demonstrate this ...


41

Stars don't show up voluntarily on a photo. You need to tweak them a bit using photo editing tools on a computer. Best if you use RAW file format, and RAW-processing software to do this. JPEGs can be tweaked to show more stars, but with a lot less working room and result being of lesser quality. The likely JPEG image you get with the exposure settings you ...


40

As of 2012, the only fundamental difference between all bodies of both brands is the registration distance (between lens mount and sensor). Nikon lenses sit slightly farther from the sensor, which means that you can mount a Nikon lens on a Canon body with a 2.5mm spacer to get the correct distance, but if you try and mount a Canon lens on a Nikon body there ...


39

As these camera makers own a smaller market share than Canon or Nikon, they have often tried more radical and innovative approaches than the big two. You can see both Canon and Nikon as more traditional makers with very consistent and proven features in their cameras. When Sony bought Konica-Minolta's camera division, they inherited the only body-based ...


39

A tripod can be unstable by: Having cheap leg fasteners / too heavy a load for the legs My first tripod ever was a hand-me-down Velbon that had seen some abuse. Even sporting just a 20D and 70-200 f/4 (~3.2lbs) if left alone, the legs would begin to collapse. Slowly, sure, but enough to not want to walk away or be able to do a long exposure. Poor ...


36

I don't see the DSLR going anywhere anytime soon. The advent of mirrorless cameras does not constitute a life-ending event for DSLR's, or any other type of camera design. The advent of mirrorless simply expands the available pool of camera types, diversifying the options and making it easier for each individual photographer to get the camera gear that best ...


35

The answer you found on Yahoo is mostly wrong. The basic statement (same as dpollitt's answer here) is correct — theoretically, image quality shouldn't degrade but a number of factors might make it worse. And the list of things that might go wrong is sound enough. But the mapping of symptoms to problems is very inaccurate. Point by point: One would be ...


35

tell me whats happening Considering that the White Thing seems to affect an entire band at the top of the image, I don't think it's a light leak. A leak that happened to shine evenly across the entire width of the sensor would be hard to explain. Instead, it looks like the shutter is getting a little bit stuck near the end of its travel across the sensor. ...


34

Things to consider when thinking of purchasing your first dSLR. 1. Can I afford a dSLR? If you've never used an interchangeable lens camera system before, realize that the cost is astronomical in comparison with fixed-lens cameras, because the camera body itself is just the start of your purchases and the basis of your system. It is also (weirdly) the most ...


34

To investigate sensor dust, perform the following test: Close your aperture as much as possible (high F-number). This makes the sensor dust more visible. Increase the focal length as much as possible (zoom in). Focus on infinity (not sure if the focus part is actually necessary) on a bright, uniform background. I've found that the blue sky works well for ...


32

"Better image quality." You use that phrase. When we say image quality in reference to comparing two lenses, we rarely are talking about anything with regard to which one is "... less dark and gives more vivid colors."¹ Those things are more a function of the light in the scene, the photographer's skill at seeing that light and capturing it while also ...


31

If you read the other answers, it should be apparent that the qualities you seek such as (a) better portraits and (b) the desire to have a blurred background ... aren't really one thing, but a combination of many factors. There are some nuances but the short answer is ... portraits do not require advanced DSLRs (so entry level is fine) but... there are ...


30

You need a lens. It's probably possible to persuade the camera to expose the sensor without a lens on it, but nothing would be in any sort of focus whatsoever. As an aside, if you're asking this kind of basic question about cameras, I'd question whether a full-frame SLR like the D750 is the right choice. You'll end up spending a lot more on your equipment (...


30

Disclaimer: This answer does not offer any help with decreasing shutter volume - it is an anecdote and therefore just a viewpoint that is related to your status quo. I think that there is not much you can do about it - if you are aware that your camera is non-silent and you try your best to avoid it being disturbing, you already did everything you could. ...


30

This is usually caused by the camera taking the scene as a whole and treating it as 18% gray. This is the way light meters (and camera meters) are calibrated to see the world. Scene mostly snow? 18% gray. Black cat in a coal mine? 18% gray. The camera doesn't know what you're taking a picture of, so it assumes that the scene is, on average, 18% gray and ...


29

This might sound like a stupid question, but… is it actually “safe” to change the lens on the camera? Is this likely to destroy it? Changing lenses is quite safe for your camera, less so for your wallet. Once you see what your camera can do with different lenses, you'll want to start a small collection. Some lenses, like a typical 50mm f/1.8, are very ...


29

The overall difference in typical image quality between a current smartphone like the Huawei P30 Pro and an older DSLR like the Canon EOS Rebel T1i/500D isn't the difference between the sensors. The difference is about who makes the decisions when shooting and, more importantly, in post processing about how both are done. Recent smartphones have gotten very ...


27

It depends on what you mean by "highest". If you have enough light, then the first thing you should do is to reduce the ISO setting to the minimum, so that you can get as much light as possible on the sensor1. Lower ISO means less noise, more dynamics. If there is still enough light, then close the diaphragm a bit compared to its maximum possible aperture (...


27

Don't forget a major drawback that EVF's require power to compose, and are much harder on batteries if you spend a lot of time with the screen on. Also, as previously mentioned, because of delays, it is harder to follow moving objects with an EVF.


26

The first step is to find a situation where the atmosphere is right for such effects to appear to the naked eye - whether it's steam or fog or dust or whatever else in the air that is reflecting the light. Once you have that, the lens, aperture, shutter and ISO don't matter as much, as long as the combination chosen results in a good exposure and the ...


26

There's probably something on the sensor - maybe a dust particle. You can check if the Canon camera has a sensor cleaning option and use it or take the camera to a local repair shop and have the sensor cleaned there. Or you can clean the sensor yourself, but I wouldn't recommend it, as you are a beginner.


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