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16

If you want black, black velvet from the fabric shop does a really good job. Here is a sample tabletop, the full light is directly on it. This was a ISO 200 f/8 photo with flash. It is a better grade called dressmaking velvet, which does better than the cheaper grades. The fabric shop will know what you want. I don't know about using it in sunlight, try ...


15

What you need, is Vantablack. This awesome material reflects only .04% of light - way too little to affect those silver halides. That being said, I don't think it's commercially available. Perhaps there's a similar knockoff on the market? All daydreaming aside, instead of trying to block all light from reflecting off the object and being recorded...why not ...


14

Use something with a matte finish or matte fibres. Take a magnifying glass to a fabric store along with a light and something to take reflective light metering with. Shiny synthetic fibres [and even some natural wools] might look black, but are at risk of casting bright specular reflections toward the camera which increases the apparent brightness. You ...


6

No, you can not correct double exposure. Film exposure is one way street - you can not reverse the process, just like you can not reverse the changes in the silver ion that has been struck by light (or turn omelette back into eggs).


5

The term people usually use is "double exposure". As far as I know, it is only useful to do when you don't move film at all, not move it a fraction of a frame length. On many film cameras there is a special button, that will wind the shutter, but prevent film movement (link is to the manual info on Nikon FE). Not directly relevant to the question, but ...


3

There are several ways one could get results similar to the one in your example image. Among them: Use multiple exposures shot at slightly different angles and subject distances (or focal lengths). Use special effects lenses in front of the main camera lens, such as a "prismatic lens". Use a single exposure and post process it using different layers with ...


3

it sounds like what you are expercing is the effect caused by rolling shutter used in modern day CMOS sensors. The effect happens when the blades move faster than the sensor can read out the image. The sensor reads line by line, and the blades have the opportunity to move past the sensor multiple times during the readout, creating the artifacts. Here is a ...


1

Depends on the camera, but look at bracketing settings. Most cameras allow you to take 3 exposures - one correct (as metered), one underexposed and one overexposed, but some allow 2 exposures too - e.g. one as metered and one overexposed (which seems to be what you're looking for). If you enable bracketing before starting the timelapse, the camera should ...


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