15

The D5300 and D5500 bodies do not have the depth of field preview button. Whether it matters is a personal preference. I never use the DOF preview on my camera (ok, maybe occasionally when shooting macro). With digital you can just shoot and review on the LCD. There are some limitations around how accurate DOF preview is with wider apertures. See these ...


11

Why is the Depth of Field Preview button necessary? With the lens wide open, as it normally is before you take the shot, you can't tell how much depth of field you'll get in the photograph. When you press the button, the lens is stopped down to the selected aperture letting you see the shot as it will be recorded, depth of field and all. For both digital ...


7

First, a word about what depth-of-field is and is not: In a way, depth-of-field is an illusion. There is only one plane of focus. Everything in front of or behind the point of focus is out of focus to one degree or another. What we call DoF is the area where things look, to our eyes, like they are in focus. This is based on the ability of the human ...


7

What am I missing? You're missing that Depth of Field is subjective. In actuality, there's only one plane that's in focus — everything else can't be. Then, there's an area around that plane that is indistinguishable from out of focus because it's beyond the technical limitations of your camera to distinguish from perfectly in-focus. But, that's often quite ...


6

If I'm getting the question correctly, it is about whether at infinity focus you ought to use wider apertures like f/1.4 or narrower apertures like f/11 to get the sharpest results? The answer is, it depends... First let's look at what depth of field actually is at infinity focus. The depth of field depends on three things: Focus distance, focal length, ...


6

I hate to say this, but first make sure you're pressing the right button, as I always press the wrong one. There are two similar buttons. One is the function button near the top of the lens, and the DOF preview button is almost under the lens. If you press the DOF button, even with the aperture wide open, it will make a very clunky sound, like when you ...


6

With many of Canon's advanced series of DSLRs (e.g. 5D Mark III, 7D Mark II), it would be possible that the Depth of Field Preview button has been remapped to perform some other function. But the 5D Mark II has no custom function setting in the menu that allows remapping of the DoF Preview button to do something else. When you press the DoF Preview button ...


5

why a lens's aperture only shuts to its specified stop when the shutter release is pressed, instead of staying static at that stop constantly That's because a closed aperture would reduce the amount of light coming to your eye. The viewfinder would be dim. Try the preview button on a lens with a wide open aperture like f1.4 and an aperture setting of f22 ...


4

Your camera is operating as it should. "Liveview" is a term that describes using the rear LCD as a viewfinder. In the "OLD" days, film cameras used some kind of an optical viewfinder. When digital cameras came long 35mm Digital SLR's continued to use an optical viewfinder while "Point and Shoot" compact digital cameras and "Mirrorless" cameras tended to ...


4

Can someone either confirm it exists or tell me how? Page 61 of the EOS 100 user manual explains how to set the various custom functions. There's a list of 7 different settings you can turn on, and (as @Gerhardh pointed out in a comment) custom function 5 lets you use the AE Lock button for depth of field preview. Here's the short version: Set the command ...


4

Unless you have programmed the DOF button to do something else, which you can on most DSLRs, you should see a difference as long as there are objects at different distances in your viewfinder. At the very least, the view has to get darker when stopping down. If it does not, then you DOF button is doing something. If it is, you will see a change in ...


3

The importance is being able to see a closer approximation of what the image will look like. Normally when looking through a viewfinder (unless the lens has a manual aperture) the aperture is open all the way. This means what you see is a) very bright and b) has a very narrow field of view. This is done because it helps the autofocus work better and also ...


3

Almost all SLRs for the last several decades do metering and allow focusing, either manual or phase detection AF, with the lens at its widest aperture setting. This allows focusing to be more accurate and the viewfinder to be as bright as possible. But this also means the DoF when viewing the scene through the viewfinder is not an accurate indication of the ...


3

There is an easy answer courtesy of my site, Neocamera. Go to the Camera Search, select any criteria you want and turn on the Depth-Of-Field Preview icon (it looks like aperture blades) by clicking on it. For example, if you select SLR and DOF-Preview, you get the set of all DSLRs that have a DOF-Preview function. There are currently 37 such cameras (from ...


3

Pretty much any camera with a DOF button works the way you want. The only caveat is that older manual focus SLRs could preview wider apertures (and had brighter viewfinders) than newer SLRs (including film SLRs). On some cameras you can get still brighter focusing screens, with split prisms, etc, either from the manufacturer or from a 3rd party (e.g. http://...


2

As I understand the question, you're asking about lens sharpness/IQ when depth of field is not a concern. Light itself is sharpest when it is not bent through an aperture restriction, but that can't happen. So light is sharpest when it is bent the least... i.e. the largest aperture opening/smallest f#, resulting in the least diffraction. But for that to ...


1

Is it better approach to use f1.4 for stars, city/mountains landscapes and other type of photography where object of interest are very far from me and I want to have them sharp? It depends (stars and landscapes have different answer). For stars, you want: The largest sensor you can afford. For most serious astrophotographers, it'll probably be a full ...


1

Film Format Basis vs. Pixel Basis The depth of field (DoF) is the region in which, due to optical physics, a point has, on the film or the sensor, an image smaller than the size of the circle of confusion (CoC). The CoC is "classically" determined from the accuracy of the human eye and the distance at which a given size image will be looked at, a common ...


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