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8

Once you discard information before saving a file you can not later retrieve it. M-Raw and S-Raw files are lower resolution versions of the raw file created by the information produced by the digital sensor on the camera. The information from multiple pixel wells is averaged into a single value for each "pixel" of the lower resolution files. Once that ...


8

The DNG spec contains a tag DefaultScale: DefaultScale is required for cameras with non-square pixels. It specifies the default scale factors for each direction to convert the image to square pixels. Typically these factors are selected to approximately preserve total pixel count. The situation with your anamorphic lens is effectively this: the photosite ...


7

Partly. Some of the steps normally taken during demosaicing, such as setting black point, are performed when files are converted to DNG and can't be reversed later on. Other steps, such as interpolating the monochromatic luminance values of each pixel into RGB values based on the color mask characteristics of a particular sensor, are not. Converting an ...


7

Check the Apply During Import pane's settings in the Import window (if you have the window minimized, expand to the full window with all the settings). Lightroom can automatically apply a preset upon import, and it sounds like that's what's happening to you. You may have accidentally got it set to something that's causing the weird processing. You also ...


6

You don't say which camera(s) you're using for the original RAW files, but in general when creating a DNG file on your computer, you've got the enormous processing power of your computer which can be used to drive the most sophisticated compression algorithms around. Compare this with your camera, which has much less processing power and can therefore use ...


6

I think you're under a misconception here. There's no evidence that the Android phone is doing anything but picking a middle exposure. The scene has a lot of dynamic range — it's a big difference between the shadows and the sky, but the camera is doing a great job keeping both (as you say, it looks like it activated the auto-HDR in camera). Lightroom is ...


6

You get the desired result if you convert you raw file to tiff. If you don't like "separate interpretation by every program" as you said in one of your comments, use manufacturers convertor - that will give you the interpretation the manufacturer believe is the best and that is usually very close to the one that the in-camera JPEG processor has.


5

I think you should be able to do it using "exiftool" --- I tested on a Linux PC, via commandline, and with a Sony ARW image, so your mileage may vary --- I have no DNG to test with. The command is basically: exiftool '-previewImage<=myown.jpg' test.arw (the quotes are needed in Unix to prevent the shell interpretation of <=). I have a bit of ...


4

The MacOS X feature that's responsible for showing you previews in Finder, Spotlight, standard file dialogs, etc., is called QuickLook. QuickLook needs an importer for each type of file that you'd like to preview. For standard types like text files, JPEG and PNG images, sounds, and others, the system has built-in QuickLook importers. In other cases, ...


4

dcraw can't do this directly, but it can do something which will get you pretty close: render each pixel as a grayscale, either with unscaled pixel values with -D or scaled ones with -d. This will give you a PGM format image which will look like this (cropped and zoomed in, so each square is one pixel): In this image, the bright dots happen to be the blue-...


4

RAW files are supposed to be edited and color corrected, that's their purpose - it is a digital negative (dng). When you make it positive you have control on how it becomes positive image that we see. The 'transfer' happens from dng/RAW to jpg not the other way round. Changes to raw files are non-destructive. Here are the things I did in your dng files to ...


3

Converting an image file from the manufacturer's raw format to .dng will strip all of the information in the maker notes section of the EXIF data. Since all Adobe products ignore the maker notes to begin with, if you only use Adobe products you will not see a difference in this respect. There are additional things that the conversion strips as well. For ...


3

There may be a work around using Adobe DNG Converter. I don't have a Mac to try it on, but it can convert many DNGs to a more generic type.


3

On the import tab choose "Copy" instead of "Copy as DNG", then you will retain the large data amount. One of the benefits of using DNG is that it uses less space. But normally it is only a 20% improvement. It would be helpful to know your camera model, so we can see waht raw format it is (compression or not, number of previews, etc.. The raws contains ...


3

It's picking up the embedded jpeg preview. Edit --> Preferences --> File Handling --> JPEG Preview --> Select 'Full Size' --> OK Then select photos --> right-click --> Metadata --> Update DNG Preview and Metadata. I tried this, and subsequent to it re-uploading (this was a DNG in a Google Drive folder) the dimensions are showing correctly and the quality ...


3

I'm not sure how to do this in Lightroom, or if you even can, but I have an alternate solution: remove the DNGs from Lightroom, then use Exiftool too copy the GPS tags from the JPEG files to the DNG files, and then re-import. If I understand the situation correctly, this won't undo your organization, since you can leave the JPEGs as placeholders for the ...


3

Do smartphone cameras generally expose to the right? That's not something you can generalize because there are lots of smartphones out there with lots of different sensors in them that behave differently. Yours in particular appears to do that, probably because the manufacturer determined that doing so gets the best performance out of the sensor. In ...


3

I don't know of any raw converter (dcraw, ufraw, etc.) that will do this for you. But, if you have ImageMagick installed, you can use dcraw to create a TIFF and then just do: convert -channel red -separate myimage.tif red.pgm To extract all channels into separate files, you can use: convert myimage.tif -separate myimage_%d.pgm


3

Picasa is automatically applying exposure correction to your very dark image. Since this scene is intentionally very dark, this automatic is going wrong. It brightens the image up considerably, thereby making the noise, which was hidden in the shadows previously, visible. You can easily change this by editing the picture and turning the exposure correction ...


3

What you need to do is to upgrade your version of Adobe DNG Convertor. The reason is camera vendors make slight changes in RAW formats of (almost) every new camera they release. And Adobe every several months release new version of DNG Convertor where is included support of new cameras (beside other changes). The same is true for RAW processor of Lightroom, ...


3

When you view the image with a normal image viewer, is it mostly dark? If not, a gamma curve has been applied. That is, does it look like this? That's what you'll get with a pure dump of linear values into a 16-bit tiff file. Or, encoded across 8 bits, and demosaiced, and with white-balance adjusted, something like this: If it looks like that or similar, ...


2

Good news, Aperture now supports Leica M Monochrom DNGs! Enjoy.


2

The Lightroom Queen explains how to make Lightroom apply lossy or lossless DNG compression to raw files (including DNGs) that are in your photo library: Select the images. (This means LR can only do this one folder at a time.) Go to Library menu > Convert Photos to DNG... [not a memorable command name for this purpose] In the dialog, pick: Only convert RAW ...


2

The format longevity question is impossible to answer conclusively. But it reminds me a bit of the best advice I've heard for preserving ones' personal artwork: become famous. Famous artists have their work in galleries and museums, and a whole industry exists to support them. Similarly, I imagine that the most popular cameras will have the best chance of ...


2

Sounds to me that it is more likely to have been a failure saving the file over the network. Network backups are nice for archival storage, but horrible for live work due to the extremely slow load times for relatively large files. The process I generally use is to initially transfer my files to my high speed scratch SSD array (striped). I then ...


2

Short Answer No, I don't think that it is supported. I'm not sure though if it is generally possbile. Long Answer To find out the truth, we need to look at different Specifications. (Hint: All Page numbers in the following text are the page numbers a PDF reader reports, not the one on the bottom of the page.) This documentation states, that Lightroom uses ...


2

Unfortunately no. Only one Develop Setting can be saved to a dng file. However you have 2 options to export the Image and its Virtual Copies out of your Lightroom catalogue. Option 1 Select your whole Stack, and click on the Export-Button in the library module. Select the "export as dng" Preset. Now Lightroom creates a separate .dng file for each of ...


2

Well, you've certainly run into "The Photoshop Tax" on new cameras. :) To get Photoshop/ACR to open a RAW file directly, it must be a new enough version that groks the RAW of the camera model. And since RAW is not a file format or a standard, and changes with each camera model, and Adobe has no time-travel capability, this means a version of ACR that came ...


2

This accounts for nonlinearity in human perception of brightness. This page, citing Williamson & Cummins (1983), explains: In considering this question we can replace "reflectance" with "exposure." Note that the response curve has a roughly constant slope for all but the darkest range.


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