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46

The reflection on the screen tells me you used a flash. The flash only lasts a very short time (at most 1/200 of a second), while the shutter was probably open for a much longer time (maybe 1/30 of a second). Since the frame of your CRT as well as the wall behind it do not emit light on their own, their appearance on the photo is mainly due to them ...


24

The main reason is that it is low powered. An raster LCD - color or not - requires much more power and most of them need a permanently on back-light. New OLED display do not need the back-light but still pull more power than a segment-based LCD which has much fewer electronic circuits. Most current top-plate LCDs mirror what is shown in the status line of ...


16

Normally you would use sRGB mode. It is the most common denominator. Keep in mind that this mode is not calibrated, so your sRGB colors will be different from other sRGB colors. They should be closer. Once in sRGB mode your monitor may not be able to show colors which are outside of sRGB color-space which is why sRGB is not the default mode. The truly odd ...


11

The tool displaycal-profile-info, part of the DisplayCAL package, can do this. This works (and works basically the same way) for Windows, Mac, and Linux. See for example for my (calibrated) ThinkPad screen: ... which has a 60% coverage of sRGB and 43% coverage of Adobe RGB.


9

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom does. It has since version 4.3 released on December 13th, 2012(it was also in an earlier RC). What are you actually looking for is support of HiDPI, which Lightroom 4.3 and above has. Adobe also updated Photoshop CS6 to version 13.0.2 which supports HiDPI displays. (Note that this does not apply to Photoshop Elements, for which no ...


8

In order to use the rear LCD to compose pictures (as opposed to using the optical viewfinder), you must put your camera into "Live View" mode. On the 600D (and all other recent Canon SLRs), this is done by pressing the button marked with a camera icon and a red dot which is just to the right of the viewfinder: It is worth noting that using the rear LCD ...


8

Segment LCD is a technology with the lowest power consumption of all available display technologies and those are more than visible on sunlight or any kind of strong light without any need for background lightning (except at night). Very useful for battery operated devices. It's also the cheapest possible display technology. They are also extremely robust. ...


8

This really depends on what you mean by "touch screen" and "image editing" as well as your own workflow and efficiency. I've been a Photoshop user for more than 20 years. I could use a Cintiq or other touch screen option IN ADDITION to a desktop/laptop to see directly on the drawing surface what I'm working on. However, the many 2-in-1 options are very ...


8

Check how the image review time is set on your camera. It sounds like yours has somehow been set to Off. These are the instructions from p.60 of the 70D manual: If you set Hold, the image will be displayed for the same amount of time you have set for auto power-off.


7

It is not that the display switches to viewfinder after some seconds, it is that the camera goes to sleep mode. So you need to go to Menu, then look for the Auto Power off option, and choose the timeout value. You can switch it off entirely, which means that your camera would never go into sleep mode, you'd have to manually hit the OFF switch to switch the ...


7

I have an HP Envy touchsmart, so laptop with touchscreen. I'll be honest I find the use of the touchscreen a hindrance/gimmick rather than useful: It's not overly accurate (plus compare the accuracy of your fingertip over a stylus). You spend your life cleaning it. With an actual laptop, rather than tablet/laptop hybrid, it's not that easy to use as they ...


7

There is no "standard" picture aspect ratio in photography, only some common ones. 35 mm frames are 3:2. Old TV was 4:3. HDTV is 16:9. The way to pick the aspect ratio is to consider what the picture will be displayed on. If it will mostly be seen on a TV, then 16:9 is a obvious choice. If you will make a poster and hang it on a wall, then you can ...


6

From my experience of buying and operating similar projectors for a camera club in the past I'd start out by saying the factors and figures you need to consider are not the ones they usually sell projectors on, and certainly applying bigger=better may not be appropriate... Pitfalls Most projectors are not sold or built for displaying photos, video is often ...


6

Contrast ratio is the ratio of intensity between the darkest point the display can make and the brightest. In a dark room, the bright white spot will be 1000 times brighter than the blackest pixel on the 1000:1 ratio or 900 times on the 900:1. From that stat alone, the Epson has an advantage, however that also isn't the only stat you need to look at. ...


6

VersaTile is getting ready to fundraising for an eInk Digital Picture frame on Kickstarter (you can follow the updates from @getversatile on Twitter ). I think that color eink technology (and black and white, for that matter) is finally to the point where you could conceivably make one of these frames work--200dpi is higher than the retina display on an ipad ...


6

There is no specific standard, but there are a few aspect ratios that turn up a lot. Currently the 16:9 (1.77:1) ratio of HDTV (1920x1080) is probably the most common. Both 4K (3840x2160) and 8K (7680x4320) video also use the same aspect ratio. It is very likely that when someone references a widescreen TV this is the aspect ratio they mean. Some widescreen ...


6

So, how do one take photos of items inside display case? A circular polarizing filter will help you reduce reflections. You don't necessarily have to push your lens up against the glass -- just getting closer will help to reduce the reflections. Avoid having a strong light source in line with the camera, either behind you or on the camera. Don't use on-...


5

Considering that an average monitor has about 6-bit per channel color depth (8 bit minus the dithering), I guess 10-bit is for color proofing/professional DTP/digital cinema. And higher than 8 bit per channel has another challenges: Video card: the video card needs to support color outputs more than 8 bits per channel. Considering that DVI supports only 8 ...


5

If I am understanding you correctly, it sounds like you are taking a photo with the aperture set to less than the smallest f/ number possible for the lens. When you use a smaller aperture (larger f/number) then the image is darker and the depth of field is bigger (resulting in a sharper background). When you look through the viewfinder, the aperture is ...


5

The effect is created due to you rotating and the lines being drawn from top to bottom and your shutter was open long enough to capture all lines being emitted. How did the image get skewed that way? You're rotating clockwise and when the flash went, a line at the top of the lower quarter of the screen was being emitted. Then you captured the next line when ...


5

Has the diopter adjustment dial on the back of the viewfinder been moved? If everything was clear to your eyes before moving it will make everything in the viewfinder blurry to your eyes. The diopter adjustment wheel is pretty much in the same position across most major camera brands. It is provided to help users who wear glasses (or need to) to adjust the ...


5

It's purely a matter of opinion, unfortunately. My own suggestion would be that matted prints always look better than simply framed prints, and some more so with a double mat. I typically go with one solid white or black mat for black and whites with either a black or white frame and for color, go with complementary colored mats and frames that complement ...


4

If you have a spyder 5 pro it will give you a chart and percentages of coverage for srgb, ntsc, and adobe rbg Here is my srgb result


4

I photograph for museums and galleries and work framed under glass is always a pain. I think there are a couple of options for museum glass which has an anti-reflective coating that might help. A company called tru vue makes it and there are distributors all over. I found a website that sells it but there may be options close to wherever you are.


3

You can't, you can see why with a simple experiment: Walk into a very well lit room, set the camera to aperture priority (Av) and select reasonable exposure values (for example, f/5.6, ISO 400) also set the camera to capture raw files Turn off all the lights so that the room is fairly dark, take a picture of one of the walls (if you don't have a tripod it ...


3

The comment is really saved, but it's in the photo file's metadata — a collection of information in each file describing the photo, the camera it was taken with, the camera settings, and so on. In the manual (page 138, Nikon says that you can see this with the included ViewNX 2 software. That's true, but you can also see it with any photo viewer which ...


3

There won't be an impact to photography itself. The display medium is changing and that means that better details in displayed images but prints require more resolution still. This is not as new as you think. Over 10 years ago, I had a loaned IBM T220 on my desk which is a 9 megapixels display. The precision was incredible and while the list price dropped ...


3

Ideally, output sharpening is always dependent on the target medium. Optimal quality needs an image which was resized and sharpened for the intended viewing conditions. A high-res display needs a larger image than a low-res display, and a screen needs differnt sharpening than a print, all of which should, eg., be handled automatically by the Lightroom ...


3

If the back screen tilts up, you can use it from above too. I note that the old fashioned LCD on the top screen is readable in sunlight. It uses a backlight to read in the dark, but is read using ambient reflected light in daylight. The LCD screen is unreadable outside even in moderate sun. I further note that the backlight has "regressed" from an even ...


3

Currently XYZ filters are produced using thin film technology. It is not very cheap, and not very suitable for multi-megapixel sensors. It also results in somewhat spiky spectral response curves, especially problematic when the light source has spiky spectrum, like fluorescent tubes and some flashes. Yet another reason would be higher noise levels, as XYZ ...


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