40

This has bothered me for years, especially on laptop screens that have no hardware calibration option. Here's an instant fix: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Mouse] "MouseTrails"="-1" Save that as a .reg, merge it and then Log Off/On. With mouse trails enabled windows uses a different render for the cursor which in ...


16

My monitor is calibrated (less than a month ago). I see the white/gold dress, but the highlights on the white piping have a blue tinge to me. However I have seen pics of the (supposedly) original dress, and it is a deep blue and black. To me, the only way I can reconcile this pic, and the pic of the actual dress is that if this pic was taken with a really ...


14

I have one. You're right — it's a good value for the money, and there's basically no catch except that if you're running under Mac or Windows you'll need to know a little more about what you're doing than you might if you just bought one of the big-name devices. That's because there's only software for Linux. If you are using Linux (any modern distribution),...


13

Normally you would use sRGB mode. It is the most common denominator. Keep in mind that this mode is not calibrated, so your sRGB colors will be different from other sRGB colors. They should be closer. Once in sRGB mode your monitor may not be able to show colors which are outside of sRGB color-space which is why sRGB is not the default mode. The truly odd ...


11

Color management is an annoyance that I've recently been learning about; it is not completely accurate to say that just because your monitor can only display sRGB that it's meaningless for your photos to be edited in the AdobeRGB or ProPhotoRGB space. What is actually happening is that Lightroom is translating colors from ProPhotoRGB into the sRGB space ...


10

The answer is: sRGB = (255, 241, 234). The details of the calculation: I calculated the spectrum of a blackbody at 5800 K using the Planck’s formula, then multiplied by the CIE color-matching functions of the standard 2 degrees observer and integrated over the wavelengths to get the (X, Y, Z) color. I then divided by X+Y+Z to get the chromaticity: (x, y) =...


8

There is a very nice step by step tutorial for your idea: Monitor Color Calibration for free using your DSLR He adjusts his monitor settings starting with color temperature settings. After that he adjusts the color gain of red, green and blue after taking some more photographs of his monitor showing a color calibration chart. Everything is done manually. ...


8

Yes - you need to calibrate your monitor. One option, which is what I did, is to buy a relatively cheap colorimeter, at the time the Huey Pro was generally available. I used it as a travel colorimeter. Later, when I wasn't traveling as much, I bought a more expensive colorimeter (Lacie Blue-Eye Pro) for my home IPS monitor. I found that the cheaper ...


8

To me the image appears white with a bluish tint (perhaps even a light baby blue) and the gold. or brown. It just won't read as black no matter how hard I try to convince myself. I think its the black object behind it that makes it never go there for me. I can't reconcile the deeper blue of the actual dress with the slight blue cast in the image. It reads ...


7

If the image is accurate for color there can be a few things going on here. None easy to fix. As I had mentioned in an earlier answer about LED display technology, this is more than likely a metameric match produced my your measurement device from the narrow band LED backlight. The problem with LED backlights (or any backlight for that matter) is that ...


7

Carol, are you sure you have the U2414M? That's Dell's medium gamut variant of the monitor, covering about 75% of Adobe RGB. So I think that if that's the monitor you have, it's behaving as expected. See this review on TFT central for details. Dell's terminology here is unfortunately confusing, since previously the U2413 (with no M) was the wide-gamut ...


7

Viewing these three images side by side from this article makes it fairly obvious what is going on with the viral photo: Choices about exposure and white balance determine how colors in a photo are perceived. Even black objects can be so overexposed as to over-saturate all three channels (RGB) and make black appear to be white. Amplifying the three color ...


7

This is a very incomplete answer, but important in regards to terminology and understanding everything: RGB and CMYK are color models. They don't define what your monitor or printer can do, only how color is created. A great question to review: What is the difference or relation between a Color Model and a Color Space? He also told me CMYK is a 100% ...


7

After further research, here is a partial answer taking as source Blog-Couleur: Quelles sont les valeurs RVB de la colorchecker ? and BabelColor PDF and the Xrite website. The last row seems to be white 95%, neutral 80%, neutral 65%, neutral 50%, neutral 35%, black 20%. On trouve entre le blanc et le noir, une série de 4 gris : neutral 0.35, neutral 0.50,...


6

You should use D65, not 6500K. The difference is about 3% in the green channel, and it's noticeable. D65 has a "CCT" or (correlated color temperature) of just under 6504K. Reason is: the sRGB standard uses D65 and so do most other common display white points. Some more information on the difference: 6500K is an "ideal" Planckian radiator, and D65 is based ...


6

Yes, there is a point. It will let you see your own photos more accurately. Since you do not print them, I assume you look at them on your own monitor. Even if it is only for others, non-calibrated monitors differ widely but they are improving at least in the mid-range with the advent of LEDs (and eventually OLEDs), so over time people will see your images ...


6

As a photographer, I understand both what I see (blue) and the likelihood that others don't "see" exactly what I see, for any number of reasons -- especially if you allow for different photos of the same subject taken under different lighting conditions and/or different white balance settings. If anything, I have a (completely unsubstantiated) belief that ...


6

The image has an obvious yellow colour cast. If i wanted to correct it, i'd put the eyedropper on the white flecks on the fabric in the lower left, which results in a blue/black dress. If we wanted to pull the blue tinge to a shade of white, we'd have to increase the yellow, and the image would look completely unnatural and clipped. So, no, there is no ...


5

No, the camera LCD is not better than a laptop screen. Often the gamut of the camera LCD is smaller than a laptop, too. This article discusses some of the issues around the camera LCD. Another factor that you didn't mention but should consider is monitor calibration. If your laptop's display has not been calibrated then you really need to address that first ...


5

The monitor profiles generated by ColorHug follow a cross-platform standard, so once you've generated one, you can use it under any OS. The ColorHug comes with a Linux "Live CD" which boots and runs the software without any need to install anything. It's really easy, but there are a few confusing things you'll need to figure out. If you don't have the Live ...


5

Camera Colorimeter is an app on Google Play which uses the camera on your phone as a colorimeter for calibrating other devices. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.auralisoft.colorimeter [Some experimental results] I get very consistent capture results using the back camera on a Nexus 6. The following are 10 captured RGB values of the same (...


5

Do I need to calibrate my current HP laptop monitor? If you want consistent and accurate color, yes, to some degree. However, it's not strictly necessary for "pleasant", since the human eye adjusts to a wide range of colors as "correct". Can I use a non-calibrated better monitor? Sure, and your pictures will probably look nicer (as will other people's!) ...


5

Actually, #E58C4E, if you mean the web color, is defined to be in sRGB. However, if you didn't mean that particular convention but rather "red:229, green:140, blue:78", it's a different matter, because the extremes (the "primaries") of each channel are different in different color spaces, so those numbers actually do represent something different in each ...


5

In theory, this seems fine, but a cheap color calibration device gives you steps 1 and 2 already done, plus 3 done with many, many more samples than a color chart, and 4 done automatically. I'm willing to bet that inaccuracies in the first steps plus the limited number of samples add up to less-than-ideal results. With a "real" colorimeter costing under $...


5

Users have identified the problem as faulty sensors however the problem is not faulty sensors but rather faulty filters. It appears that poor quality control has resulted in residue in the filters which causes them to become opaque. The solution is not too difficult but is a little tricky. The fix requires disassembling the device and cleaning the crud off ...


5

In my opinion the designer is wrong. CMYK is NOT a subset of sRGB. It is a diferent color model. Let me explain. sRGB is a color profile for rgb colors. But actually it is close to a "color space" (yes, this afirmation will be controversial). On top of that you "profile" your monitor and computer conected together. But there are tons of diferent ...


4

I used to work for Gretag MacBeth (and later X-Rite when they acquired Gretag.) I've written code for color monitor calibration. Your calibrator is defective and it should not do that. Sadly, the color filters in the unit itself may not ever be able to calibrate your monitor. My i1Display will not calibrate my MacBook monitor... I would contact X-Rite and ...


4

The only sensible thing you can do is to calibrate your monitor and work your images with respect to how they are intended to be displayed. The problem is that there is not one way for monitors to be miscalibrated. An uncalibrated monitor will simply give different colors. Different uncalibrated monitors are likely to give different colors and the magnitude ...


4

[afaik] Unless the display driver or application being used applies a color profile or similar to compensate for the wider gamut, the color codes you use in your application will be sent to the display as-is. And in the display a specific color value (say E5) is no longer interpreted in the srgb scale but in the wider gamut scale. So why does the display ...


4

There is no global color space. A color as you specify is just a triplet of Red, Green and Blue. Each component has a value between 0 and 255 (0 and FF in hex) which indicates how much power to give each LED for a given pixel (or phosphor in the days of CRTs). The scale is relative to your monitor and its current settings. This is why monitors need to be ...


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