17

My monitor is calibrated (less than a month ago). I see the white/gold dress, but the highlights on the white piping have a blue tinge to me. However I have seen pics of the (supposedly) original dress, and it is a deep blue and black. To me, the only way I can reconcile this pic, and the pic of the actual dress is that if this pic was taken with a really ...


10

Camera Colorimeter is an app on Google Play which uses the camera on your phone as a colorimeter for calibrating other devices. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.auralisoft.colorimeter [Some experimental results] I get very consistent capture results using the back camera on a Nexus 6. The following are 10 captured RGB values of the same (...


9

There is a very nice step by step tutorial for your idea: Monitor Color Calibration for free using your DSLR He adjusts his monitor settings starting with color temperature settings. After that he adjusts the color gain of red, green and blue after taking some more photographs of his monitor showing a color calibration chart. Everything is done manually. ...


8

Yes - you need to calibrate your monitor. One option, which is what I did, is to buy a relatively cheap colorimeter, at the time the Huey Pro was generally available. I used it as a travel colorimeter. Later, when I wasn't traveling as much, I bought a more expensive colorimeter (Lacie Blue-Eye Pro) for my home IPS monitor. I found that the cheaper ...


8

To me the image appears white with a bluish tint (perhaps even a light baby blue) and the gold. or brown. It just won't read as black no matter how hard I try to convince myself. I think its the black object behind it that makes it never go there for me. I can't reconcile the deeper blue of the actual dress with the slight blue cast in the image. It reads ...


8

Viewing these three images side by side from this article makes it fairly obvious what is going on with the viral photo: Choices about exposure and white balance determine how colors in a photo are perceived. Even black objects can be so overexposed as to over-saturate all three channels (RGB) and make black appear to be white. Amplifying the three color ...


8

After further research, here is a partial answer taking as source Blog-Couleur: Quelles sont les valeurs RVB de la colorchecker ? and BabelColor PDF and the Xrite website. The last row seems to be white 95%, neutral 80%, neutral 65%, neutral 50%, neutral 35%, black 20%. On trouve entre le blanc et le noir, une série de 4 gris : neutral 0.35, neutral 0.50,...


7

If the image is accurate for color there can be a few things going on here. None easy to fix. As I had mentioned in an earlier answer about LED display technology, this is more than likely a metameric match produced my your measurement device from the narrow band LED backlight. The problem with LED backlights (or any backlight for that matter) is that ...


7

Carol, are you sure you have the U2414M? That's Dell's medium gamut variant of the monitor, covering about 75% of Adobe RGB. So I think that if that's the monitor you have, it's behaving as expected. See this review on TFT central for details. Dell's terminology here is unfortunately confusing, since previously the U2413 (with no M) was the wide-gamut ...


7

This is a very incomplete answer, but important in regards to terminology and understanding everything: RGB and CMYK are color models. They don't define what your monitor or printer can do, only how color is created. A great question to review: What is the difference or relation between a Color Model and a Color Space? He also told me CMYK is a 100% ...


6

As a photographer, I understand both what I see (blue) and the likelihood that others don't "see" exactly what I see, for any number of reasons -- especially if you allow for different photos of the same subject taken under different lighting conditions and/or different white balance settings. If anything, I have a (completely unsubstantiated) belief that ...


6

The image has an obvious yellow colour cast. If i wanted to correct it, i'd put the eyedropper on the white flecks on the fabric in the lower left, which results in a blue/black dress. If we wanted to pull the blue tinge to a shade of white, we'd have to increase the yellow, and the image would look completely unnatural and clipped. So, no, there is no ...


6

Users have identified the problem as faulty sensors however the problem is not faulty sensors but rather faulty filters. It appears that poor quality control has resulted in residue in the filters which causes them to become opaque. The solution is not too difficult but is a little tricky. The fix requires disassembling the device and cleaning the crud off ...


5

In theory, this seems fine, but a cheap color calibration device gives you steps 1 and 2 already done, plus 3 done with many, many more samples than a color chart, and 4 done automatically. I'm willing to bet that inaccuracies in the first steps plus the limited number of samples add up to less-than-ideal results. With a "real" colorimeter costing under $...


5

In my opinion the designer is wrong. CMYK is NOT a subset of sRGB. It is a diferent color model. Let me explain. sRGB is a color profile for rgb colors. But actually it is close to a "color space" (yes, this afirmation will be controversial). On top of that you "profile" your monitor and computer conected together. But there are tons of diferent ...


5

You're not really trying to produce a reasonable representation of a single wavelength because, as you have noted, an RGB color reproduction system is not capable of doing that. (Unless that wavelength of light happens to coincide with one of the wavelengths used for either red, green or blue by the emissive RGB system and if the display used emits a very ...


4

Yes it can be calibrated using the proper hardware. I have a retina display macbook and also a Spyder Elite 3, and I can calibrate it to match my 23" desktop monitor. The result is pretty close, side-by-side, the colours are almost identical. Inaccurate default settings of the Macbook This is true. You were also right about the high contrast. I was stupid ...


4

I resolved the issue by lowering the backlight setting that is added in the firmware update version from August 28, 2013. However, Seiki's directions on that download page are incorrect, instead, this is how you may update the firmware: Download the .zip file and extract the install.img file to a freshly formatted (FAT32) USB thumbdrive. (On a Mac, be ...


4

Taking an image "Outside" does not guarantee you D65 color temperature, unless measured. Also without having drivers adjusted to provide a D65 simulation on your monitor, the results can not be accurate enough to be called calibration. Even with the cheap calibration devices available it is difficult to sometimes get an accurate match between monitor and ...


4

There is one piece of software that I know of that can handle it: BetterJPEG. I have downloaded the latest trial, and, as it says on its web page can do lossless full-image color and brightness correction. The tools are crude compared to what is available in Photoshop, just a couple color sliders (red/cyan and blue/yellow) and a brightness slider. And ...


4

There are actually three possibilities here. First and most likely, I think, make sure you have the latest colorhug firmware. Run colorhug-flash to check. I have one of the very first colorhugs, and this red cast was common, but sometime in the last year a new firmware reduced this significantly. Second, there's actually the possibility that it's not as ...


4

Well, if there was a magic RGB setting working for all monitors in the world, there would be no need for calibration anymore, now, would there? In order to bring your display to a given temperature, you would usually use a calibration tool like the ColorHug, Spyder, or Colormunki, for example. Those will be able to measure the light emitted by your monitor, ...


4

Is it possible to calibrate correctly and identically (or nearly) 2 monitors? Only if they're identical display types. There are many different types of LCD display, and several non-LCD display types besides. Two different display types may simply be incapable of producing the same color gamut, brightness levels, evenness of illumination, contrast, etc. ...


4

Hum You are mixing diferent things here. Determine your white point. This is not the same as intensity. Ambient Light and ambient background Ambient light behind your monitor is a relative thing. Imagine you have a lamp above your desk, but all your things, desk, wall, coffe mug, are painted matt black. The sensor could pick the ambient light as the recoved ...


4

I know that I cannot control other people's screens, but that is part of the question - if I cannot know the final circumstances of viewing, then what should guide my choice? The ISO standard for viewing prints and for viewing images on a monitor is what should guide your choice. The best you can hope for is that the viewer of your images have also created ...


4

The majority of the monitors released in at least the last 5-7 years should have the native white point at 6500K, unless it's some specialized display, which usually cost much more. If the native white point of your display differs from D65, then there might be something enabled in the settings, like cinema or gaming mode. Before calibrating and profiling ...


4

If you opt-click the Calibrate... button, you get the old 'mess of steps', once you check the Expert Mode box Without Opt... With Opt... It's still nowhere near as good as using a hardware colorimeter, but there's no better free/cheap option.


3

1) Is it worth sucking it up and shelling out the dough for a calibrator, especially if don't print? Do these calibrators usually fix all issues like colors running hot and will my monitor be perfect after using one? Are they essential investments? Yes (a), no (b), yes(c). a.) As as serious hobyist it is key that the color you see while editing your photos ...


3

Why do you think your Macbook or IPhone & IPad has the calibrated screens or why are you trying to achieve those colors. As you have adequately put, you have did your research and bought the "best out of box color calibration and overall reviews for its class". Regarding your question, firstly you should use DVI, HDMI or even better DisplayPort port of ...


3

Probably you did not use color calibration on your old laptop monitor, so when you adjusted the images in Lightroom, they looked right, but in an unmanaged environment. Consequently, bringing those images to the color-managed Viewsonic will create no good at all. And finally, probably you do not have a correct color management flow from your monitor to the ...


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