53

Digital photography is not expensive but buying into it is. With film photography camera and lenses were a moderate investment but these lasted quite long. Even a battery in a film camera would last several years. Cameras and lenses were mechanical and much simpler than today's models. This made them require less expertise to manufacture and also made them ...


31

On the contrary, basic digital photography is essentially free nowadays, unlike any other time in history. When purchasing a phone (and everyone has a phone), you automatically get a camera, paying nothing. Taking photos is free, as is publishing to unlimited world audience. Just go and create.


23

No. Aliasing is result of sampling, taking discrete samples or readings of a signal, at a low enough frequency that the frequencies in the input signal are confused for other frequencies, such that they cannot be distinguished from each other. If film grain were aligned with regularity, their spatial frequency would create opportunities for aliasing, just ...


16

There's no one way. Personally I find digital frees me to defer choices until after the shot. Not only that but I can "discover" new interpretations of a scene with different crops, different toning, color and contrast. So I'd suggest what you need to do is shift your perspective. Many people resist post processing as if it was an annoying nuisance. I'd ...


16

I disagree with it being expensive. For a student, implying that they have to learn the craft, you don't need to buy the best and baddest D5 or D750 or 7d MkII. As they say in photography, what truly matters is only 4 settings on a camera, if you learn to play around with them, you can always gain expertise and experience with it. I am not talking about ...


15

The trigger voltage you are worrying about doesn't come from the camera; it's all in the flash. All the camera does, in effect, is "flip a switch"; it shorts out the centre pin of the flash and the contacts at the side of the flash's foot. The voltage problem comes from the kind of "switch" used to short out those contacts. In (most) modern cameras, that "...


14

Film is not brighter, it has different tone curve. In your examples highlights and shadows from negative are translated differently to the print than digital. With traditional films like the HP5 the curve is S-shaped. Also, with the black and white example, each film has certain tonal response to different colors, your digital conversion to bw has a ...


13

Oh, goodness — everything. Film, camera, lenses, lighting, style, fashions and trends, whether or not photography is art, everything we see today. But the "forums" were... more literal forums — people getting together in person to discuss in photography and camera clubs. And, instead of the blogosphere of today, so many periodicals. To get a taste, do a ...


11

There's two mistaken statements in your simple question: first, that sharpening is always needed for digital photographs, and second, that it's not needed in film. Let's start with the second. Film actually isn't fundamentally different here. Scanned photos often benefit from digital sharpening to match the output medium. But not even digital: the common "...


11

The shutter is closed by default on film cameras because if it was open it would have exposed the film while the camera is not in use - it's simply this way because there's no other choice. In mirrorless cameras, the shutter must be open when the camera is on but not taking pictures because otherwise the camera can't show an image on the screen or digital ...


10

Obviously, chromatic aberration is created by the lens, and the amount of CA is the same. However, film as a medium and the sensor respond a bit differently. True perpendicular light is handled in a similar way in both, but angled light meets a different surface when using film and when using a CMOS sensor. CMOS sensors have tiny lenses over the color ...


10

Assuming you're scanning 35mm or medium format negatives, and that you want to use the full resolution of your DSLR to digitize your negatives/slides, you can't do it with your setup (D750 + 24–85mm Nikon lens) alone. Why? You have to think in terms of magnification (also called reproduction ratio). See also: What does "magnification" mean? How ...


9

There is the potential for variations in many of these steps, but the first one that jumps out at me is that you used the same ISO, aperture, and shutter speed for both exposures. Also, answering your question in a comment on Rafael's answer, "The thing that bothers me is that the exposure meter on the analog camera was showing that the image is too bright ...


8

To a very good approximation: yes, assuming you've done the obvious and set your DSLR ISO to whatever film speed you're using. The definition of "ISO" is the same for film and for digital. There are a number of reasons why you might not get exactly the same exposure between the digital and film setups: ISO 200 (or whatever you're using) might not be ...


8

No, digital exposure is the same, the shutter is opened for a length of time and the sensor records whatever light strikes its surface over that time, just like film. There is some technical information here: What is the structure of a photosite? One difference between digital and film is that digital doesn't suffer from reciprocity failure.


8

I also came to digital from film. For me personalty I shoot only in RAW, when I post process I strive to achieve realistic colors and a true representation of the scene as I remember it. My opinion is that at some point post processing techniques go beyond photography and are in the realm of graphic art. Where does artistic license cross that line? I don'...


8

I think one of the first things I learned about photography was, it is not a cheap hobby. It will eat all the spare income you have. Cameras are pretty sophisticated bits of kit, whether to film or to digital. Long before they included batteries, they still were expensive. I did some quick Googling on the price of a well-known camera from the 1930's to ...


8

The cost stays high for new gear because it is new gear. The cameras you can buy today are much better than the cameras you could buy even 2-3 years ago. New technological development costs money and this is passed on in the cost of the cameras. Digital costs more than film because it is reusable. Film spread the cost out over time because the ...


8

Simple. Film shooter obsessed over...wait for it...film. How different emulsions captured the same scene, which could be push or pulled, which reacted well to stand development and how each reacted to a different developer. Darkroom techniques. These types of questions are still a hot topic on film discussion sites. With film, the camera is quite ...


7

The terms push and pull are still relevant in the sense that they are still used and understood by many enthusiast photographers. But they are probably not as common as they once were. New terms, such as expose to the right describe the same concept using different words. If you underexpose when taking the shot, then you push the exposure in editing to ...


7

The thing about digital cameras is that they were already so good ten years ago that even old, used equipment is more than adequate for students or even serious amateurs. I'm still using my Nikon D50 (ca. 2006) and I would still gain more by buying another lens than by upgrading the body. The ideal kit for a student would start with a relatively cheap but ...


6

To understand how a camera's pixel pitch may affect Depth of Field (DoF), you must first understand what DoF is as well as what it isn't. Regardless of the aperture of a lens, there will only be one distance that will be in focus. That is, there will only be one distance at which a point source of light will be focused to a single point on the recording ...


6

There is some latitude with regard to ISO sensitivity. Digital cameras often are less sensitive than the rated "base" sensitivity. The manufacturers tend to round up, possibly because it can make test results look better than they actually are. It also helps to preserve detail in the highlights. With film the manufacturers tend to round the sensitivity down. ...


6

The problem with film is that it's sensitivity reduces with the reduction of power of light source. This means that if you need exposure time x to get a satisfactory photograph, the light source with small power (i.e., magnitudes dimmer than day sky) y, you will need much more than N*x exposure time if you decide to photograph the same light source with ...


6

Your question seems to be based on the assumption that the problem is the digital camera. But it's not. The key here is composition. When a shot, or, in fact, any image is properly composed, it looks naturally appealing and pleasant to look at because your eye travels through the image comfortably. When the composition is bad, the image literally falls ...


6

Note: Even the most accurate representation of the actual film will not be able to reproduce all its properties - film behaves very differently than sensors or digital images, so if you really want to have that Velvia 50 look: Shoot Velvia. Although I myself am 90% digital, even I think that it is still great fun and very satisfying to shoot film from time ...


6

Every service I'm aware of that produces large format prints from film will initially scan your film into a digital file anyway. Cutting out the middle man will allow you to use a color-managed workflow and most likely produce better outcomes. That being said, you can either go with a service that performs digital to film conversion for the film industry (...


5

So, absolutely you can do that. In some ways you're suggesting a similar approach to the old polaroid and medium format professional shooting. Basically, the photographer would take a polaroid shot to confirm light, shadows, and general scene before shooting with the big camera. It's always more expensive to get back to the darkroom and discover that you don'...


5

On a modern SLR camera, it takes battery power to hold the shutter open. The power-free state is with the shutter closed. However, on a mirrorless camera, the shutter is open out of necessity when the camera is on. It would not make sense to require battery power to keep the shutter open too - enough power is spent on everything else. This means the ...


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