56

It would be wrong to think that increasing ISO results in no "physical" change in the camera at all. The problem with ISO is that people often call it sensitivity. That is really a misnomer...sensitivity is a fixed attribute of any given sensor, and it cannot be changed. Sensitivity is really more synonymous with the quantum efficiency of the photodiodes, ...


53

Digital photography is not expensive but buying into it is. With film photography camera and lenses were a moderate investment but these lasted quite long. Even a battery in a film camera would last several years. Cameras and lenses were mechanical and much simpler than today's models. This made them require less expertise to manufacture and also made them ...


45

The reason you can see such a large dynamic range isn't that the eye, as an optical device, can actually capture such a range - the reason is that your brain can combine information from lots and lots of "exposures" from the eyes and create an HDR panorama of the scene in front of you. The eye is pretty poor from an image quality standpoint but it has a ...


30

On the contrary, basic digital photography is essentially free nowadays, unlike any other time in history. When purchasing a phone (and everyone has a phone), you automatically get a camera, paying nothing. Taking photos is free, as is publishing to unlimited world audience. Just go and create.


28

The white balance should be indicated on the box and the datasheet for the film. There aren't too many choices though. Most films are daylight balanced for shooting in direct sunlight (approx. 5000K). If you were shooting in open shade (approx. 6000K), you were expected to use a slight warming filter to get rid of the blue cast. If you shot daylight-...


23

No. Aliasing is result of sampling, taking discrete samples or readings of a signal, at a low enough frequency that the frequencies in the input signal are confused for other frequencies, such that they cannot be distinguished from each other. If film grain were aligned with regularity, their spatial frequency would create opportunities for aliasing, just ...


18

Each colour film reacts differently to light and renders colours in it's own unique way, if you are trying to accurately simulate film then you need to learn the properties of the particular emulsion. However if you are trying to get a generic retro look to your images then this is much easier. I shot a wedding a few years ago and decided to do the whole ...


16

There were several techniques: Carry extra film backs (MF) or camera bodies (35mm) with different film loaded Push process lower ISO film to sacrifice fine grain in favor of perceived higher ISO Rewind the film already in the camera until just the leader is outside the canister, noting what frame you are on, then load a different roll. You can then reload ...


16

There's no one way. Personally I find digital frees me to defer choices until after the shot. Not only that but I can "discover" new interpretations of a scene with different crops, different toning, color and contrast. So I'd suggest what you need to do is shift your perspective. Many people resist post processing as if it was an annoying nuisance. I'd ...


16

I disagree with it being expensive. For a student, implying that they have to learn the craft, you don't need to buy the best and baddest D5 or D750 or 7d MkII. As they say in photography, what truly matters is only 4 settings on a camera, if you learn to play around with them, you can always gain expertise and experience with it. I am not talking about ...


15

The trigger voltage you are worrying about doesn't come from the camera; it's all in the flash. All the camera does, in effect, is "flip a switch"; it shorts out the centre pin of the flash and the contacts at the side of the flash's foot. The voltage problem comes from the kind of "switch" used to short out those contacts. In (most) modern cameras, that "...


14

You young'ns have it too easy with your digital cameras that let you adjust ISO at whim. This is how you overcome it: Technique: breathing, bracing, practice, practice, and more practice. (Honestly, I think the high ISO capability of DSLRs has made many people very lax in this area.) Monopod or tripod. Or a tree, doorjamb, car -- anything you can lean ...


14

No, the effect does not exist. However, long exposures in digital have their own host of problems: Sensor overheating. This used to be a bigger problem, but with the advent of video DSLRs this has mostly disappeared. Hot pixels. Some sensors just don't like staying "active" and will internally leak and produce a single color hot pixel. Cameras and software ...


14

Film is not brighter, it has different tone curve. In your examples highlights and shadows from negative are translated differently to the print than digital. With traditional films like the HP5 the curve is S-shaped. Also, with the black and white example, each film has certain tonal response to different colors, your digital conversion to bw has a ...


13

Instead of picking arbitrary numbers out of the air, do the math to get some comparisons. A "35mm" frame is 36x24mm in size. Look at the resolution spec for some films and lenses. Some films were rated at nearly 200 lines/mm, but some much less. There was a tradeoff between sensitivity and grain size. That added noise and lowered spacial resolution of ...


13

Oh, goodness — everything. Film, camera, lenses, lighting, style, fashions and trends, whether or not photography is art, everything we see today. But the "forums" were... more literal forums — people getting together in person to discuss in photography and camera clubs. And, instead of the blogosphere of today, so many periodicals. To get a taste, do a ...


11

Essentially, no - digital sensors are pretty much linear in that if you double the number of photons hitting it, you get double the output. They're obviously not perfectly linear, but they're close enough you don't need to worry about it.


11

There's two mistaken statements in your simple question: first, that sharpening is always needed for digital photographs, and second, that it's not needed in film. Let's start with the second. Film actually isn't fundamentally different here. Scanned photos often benefit from digital sharpening to match the output medium. But not even digital: the common "...


11

The shutter is closed by default on film cameras because if it was open it would have exposed the film while the camera is not in use - it's simply this way because there's no other choice. In mirrorless cameras, the shutter must be open when the camera is on but not taking pictures because otherwise the camera can't show an image on the screen or digital ...


10

To make another point to what coneslayer said, the "white ballance" of film is very subjective unless that film is ultimately viewed directly, like slides for example. In the case of negative film from which a print will be produced for final viewing, it's not that meaninful to talk about "white ballance" of just the film because there is large latitude in ...


10

Obviously, chromatic aberration is created by the lens, and the amount of CA is the same. However, film as a medium and the sensor respond a bit differently. True perpendicular light is handled in a similar way in both, but angled light meets a different surface when using film and when using a CMOS sensor. CMOS sensors have tiny lenses over the color ...


10

Assuming you're scanning 35mm or medium format negatives, and that you want to use the full resolution of your DSLR to digitize your negatives/slides, you can't do it with your setup (D750 + 24–85mm Nikon lens) alone. Why? You have to think in terms of magnification (also called reproduction ratio). See also: What does "magnification" mean? How ...


9

Sort of... because ISO values for film don't even have a 1:1 correspondence. For example, Fujichrome Velvia 50 is rated at ISO 50, but if you set your camera on 50, you will generally underexpose. Most film photographers I knew set ISO 40 instead. However Kodak E-100 typically did expose properly at ISO 100. A digital camera set at ISO 100 will typically ...


9

It's to do with the way the brain interprets the information provided by the eyes (or to put it another way, it's the software not the hardware). We only see colour and detail within a very narrow field in the centre of our vision. To build up the detailed colourful image we perceive, the brain moves this central spot around without us knowing. I'm not a ...


8

To a very good approximation: yes, assuming you've done the obvious and set your DSLR ISO to whatever film speed you're using. The definition of "ISO" is the same for film and for digital. There are a number of reasons why you might not get exactly the same exposure between the digital and film setups: ISO 200 (or whatever you're using) might not be ...


8

There is the potential for variations in many of these steps, but the first one that jumps out at me is that you used the same ISO, aperture, and shutter speed for both exposures. Also, answering your question in a comment on Rafael's answer, "The thing that bothers me is that the exposure meter on the analog camera was showing that the image is too bright ...


8

I also came to digital from film. For me personalty I shoot only in RAW, when I post process I strive to achieve realistic colors and a true representation of the scene as I remember it. My opinion is that at some point post processing techniques go beyond photography and are in the realm of graphic art. Where does artistic license cross that line? I don'...


8

I think one of the first things I learned about photography was, it is not a cheap hobby. It will eat all the spare income you have. Cameras are pretty sophisticated bits of kit, whether to film or to digital. Long before they included batteries, they still were expensive. I did some quick Googling on the price of a well-known camera from the 1930's to ...


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