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A modern scanner of typical resolution should be able to do a reasonably good job on old photos if well used. Method of use can make a difference. See references at end for some tips and guidance. A 6" x 4" print at 300 dpi corresponds to 1800 x 1200 pixels ~=.... 2.5 megapixels A 6" x 4" print at 600 dpi corresponds to 3600 x 2400 pixels ~=..... 9 ...


8

There are a number of important details missing from your question: What resolution do you require? Color or black and white? Does the scanner have to be able to handle a mix of sizes simultaneously, or can you sort them ahead of time so that all the photos in a given stack are the same? (Sheet feeders typically work best when the sheets are about the same ...


6

First, I strongly recommend Ctein's book on photo restoration. It's got all of the gory detail work and techniques in it that are needed for this: Photo repair .com site Not sure what scanner you are using, but modern scanners, even really inexpensive ones, are pretty good. I've done a fair amount of recovery work of family photos using under $100 Canon ...


4

Let me answer your direct question first: The document imaging folks have been doing this for ages. They typically are used for huge image scanning projects, like the US Census form processing. I've never seen one for photos, but that is really just a difference in pixel density -- everything else would be the same. These are insanely expensive to buy, and ...


3

They're all proprietary. Each application uses their own algorithms to convert the raw data. To the best of my knowledge none of the adjustments made with one application will translate identically in another application unless both applications use the same raw conversion engine "under the hood" (e.g. Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop both use Adobe ...


2

Regarding longevity: Permanent, ideally. As it says in the title. I'd like to keep photos forever, if possible. Like a digital archive. There will be no such thing as a passive archive system. There are no guarantees that the software to read your RAW files will exist in another decade or two, and the same is true for even the good ol' jpg. That also goes ...


2

After a few days of research, I've concluded that at the time of writing there is no holy grail. But as for futureproofing I'd go the following route: keep the original RAW file work with Adobe products for the adjustments (either inside Lightroom or with sidecar xmp files produced by adobe camera RAW) This probably is as futureproof and cross-platform as ...


2

I would stay away from using the word "always" as exceptions certainly exist. I would assume that the quality of scanners in most shops is much higher quality then your basic negative scanner, but why don't you just ask them what quality the scans are? Most shops that are legitimate have different levels of scans depending all on what you want(and price of ...


1

Working as an IT Professional and a hobbyist photographer, I'm paranoid about data security. For me, no matter what storage mechanism you use, you should always have the data in (at least) two places. I use an external hard drive as my storage and back that up to a second external hard drive. I also backup that backup to a relative's house for an offsite ...


1

The DNG file format will allow saving adjustment information directly in the file, rather than a sidecar file, and the DNG format is a documented specification that is free for anyone to use. Some cameras support DNG natively as a RAW format, for others, you can use the free Adobe DNG converter. Within the Adobe ecosystem, images edited with the version of ...


1

I think your question mighe be better asked if there a coordinate system for XMP metadata (which is how the faces are stored, so could be considered a standard frame of reference..) I'm trying to look up the spec for XMP face data, and have yet to find where the (0,0) point is, but it's a beginning. http://www.organizepictures.com/2013/09/everything-you-...


1

The color channels are not properly aligned, so you need to break the image into color channel layers, information on how to do that can be found here. Then you can independently align the channels and remix.


1

Wait, are you saying your images are already digital but only in the wrong resolution? In that case you should really skip the printing-to-rescan part and directly use e.g. ImageMagick's convert which can easily batch-convert all images to your desired resolution. Assuming you're using Linux and all images reside in a directory original (including ...


1

To copy photos with a (digital) camera, we use Copystands & Copylights. You can easily make your own from an old enlarger and work lights. To avoid specular reflections, cut from Rosco Polarizing #7300 Filter and use on the lights. If the photoframe is made of metal, screw a linear polarizing filter onto the lens too. If using halogen work (or any ...


1

I worked in a professional lab for 15 years. With a modern high quality scanner (like the Epson Perfection V600 Photo Scanner) there will be very little difference between what you get at home and what you get from the lab. The real area where the difference exists is the final product. At Miller's (the lab I worked at), we had every scan cleaned up by a ...


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