10

Short answer: Yes, totally worth it, unless you want your softbox light to have a hot-spot and falloff. Details: Okay, so I was inspired to actually test this out, and with Stan's suggestion, to also add a Sto-Fen push-on diffuser to the mix as well. (Slight off-topic note: just as the wide-angle panel isn't really a light softener by itself, push-on ...


8

My bet is on the same thing you guess — light reflected from the diffuser bouncing around badly. This is especially likely if you've tipped the flash to point the diffuser dome forward, as I've seen some people do. The EF 85mm f/1.2L is not a physically long lens and even with a hood you might have the light source protruding way too far forward. This is ...


6

I have a Godox V860C light and a Godox Cells II remote trigger. OK, from this, I gather that you have a Canon camera. The Godox V860C is an eTTL-II-capable flash, so if you want to use that capability, it's there. However, the Cells II triggers are manual triggers that do not communicate eTTL information, so with this specific combination you do not have ...


6

We have a couple of existing questions that might help. Take a look at When and how to use a push-on flash diffuser? regarding the plastic caps. They aren't really meant to be diffusers by themselves, since they are so small. Instead, they provide a bare-bulb effect, and if you are in a room with a low white ceiling and walls, the diffusion comes from light ...


6

The difference the diffuser shape makes is mainly the shape of the catchlights. I.e - shoot a person with a square diffuser, you'll get a square catchlight in their eye. Shoot them with something round, the catchlight will be round, which arguably may look more natural. On the other hand, square catchlight can look like a window, which is also neat. ...


5

When it comes to diffusion and soft lighting, it is the relative size of the lightsource that counts. Even the smallest diffuser such as one of those Stofen thingies will act like a huge softbox, when your subject is the size of an ant! This was was produced with a bare speedlight i.e. no diffuser at all:


5

The options I'm thinking of must have some characteristics. Portable. Easy assembly. Must be attached to the speedlight (does not matter if the speedlight is on the camera or not) Can be held by the photographer with one hand. (off-camera light) Decent size, so it provides a decent diffusion. Wall/Ceiling independent. :o) I have not tested this, but it ...


4

The hot shoe on your 750D is reporting the presence of the accessory attached to the hot shoe. Even though the accessory is not conductive, the pressure it places on the spring under the side rail on the right side of the hot shoe (as viewed from behind the camera) is depressing a switch under the hot shoe to let the camera know something is attached. I ...


4

I am quite certain that "Sto-Fen" is just the name of one company. As you note, that company doesn't call their product a "stofen" — they call it the "Omni-Bounce". I don't find any evidence for any prior generic use of the Sto-Fen name anywhere — or for that matter, much use today. If you do a Google Books search, you only get references to this product ...


3

The problem you had is that your flash was at it's maximum output. No amount of flash exposure compensation will fix that. For maximum flash effectiveness you want your shutter speed at exactly the maximum sync speed even if it does support HSS. If that's still not bright enough at maximum flash power output, then you have options: Move the flash closer ...


3

Umbrellas work just fine with speedlights. The light from a speedlight is not too directed for that, especially if you use white umbrellas which will spread the light more or less independently of which direction it came from. I will echo James's comment to check out Strobist.com for info on how to make good use of off-camera speedlights. The most useful ...


3

When it comes to diffusers you should be looking to use the same sizes as you would for monolights. The flash tube of a monolight often isn't that much larger than the head of a speedlight and the size of the modifier is mainly what creates the effect. This is echoed by the soft mods section in Strobist blog's gear recommendations. Strobist blog is highly ...


3

Metal surfaces are one of the most difficult things to photograph. You're on the right track with using diffused lighting but if, as you say, the diffusers you have are "taking away too much light" then you have to compensate for that by using a tripod and longer shutter speeds. I've used white umbrellas with the light shining through them to light metal ...


3

I just solved the same issue with my Canon 80D. I found that the diffuser’s foot depresses a small bar on the right side of the hot shoe when it slides in. I cut away a small rectangular piece from the top right of the foot, leaving a little piece at the bottom so that it will still slide in, but now it doesn’t register with the hot shoe and the flash will ...


2

It actually says in the description: "lighting- extern flash canon 480II+ difuzor" I guess he either used the diffuser supplied with his speedlite or, as Matt above mentioned, a Sto-fen diffuser (these are the most popular nowadays). Yes you are right, light in macro photography is really important. I'm surprised that he managed to achieve such excellent ...


2

A soft box is a means of diffusing light. You can use one with flashes or constant output lamps, but you still need multiple lights positioned around the box to provide good light from multiple directions. The idea is just that the light hits the box and then the walls of the box act as the diffused light source that lights the object. If budget is a ...


2

Typically when the flash is pointed straight up you want it to bounce off the ceiling and the light to rain down evenly on your subject and background. This will require more flash power to properly expose your subject then just pointing the flash straight at the subject. Since the camera has no way to know that you applied an attachment that is bending ...


2

The point of a diffuser is to create light that comes from a larger area and is more spread out than what the bare flash produces. Theoretically, its shape influences the distribution of the light as well, but due to the spreading-out effect, light basically goes from every point on the diffuser's surface in all directions. Which means that in practice, a ...


2

The softbox itself will have a hot spot where the middle is brighter than the corners. The additional diffuser would spread the light more evenly inside the softbox and reduce this hotspot. That would translate to flatter light and less hotspots in your image. If you use the softbox without the additional diffuser your images should be soft but still have ...


2

Absolutely! You're using this for a video setup, but it's common in still photography with strobes, where this technique is known as "bounce flash". The caveat is that strobes — like from studio lighting, from hotshoe flashes, or even from the popup flash of a camera — are very short intense bursts of light. Your lamp, and probably even your spotlight, won'...


2

It will work after a fashion, but you'll get substantial reduction in light level when the light is reflected. In your application it may well be adequate. If you wish to use a diffuser you do not need a formal or commercial one. The paper that you intend stick on the wall could be used instead as a diffuser - it may prove too opaque, but it's easily tried....


2

A partial answer: Does E-TTL work when the flash is off shoe? I don't think it does. If so, does that mean the E-TTL is pointless whenever shooting off-shoe? You need to set the 3 parts to TTL mode: the flash, the trigger, and the camera. I put the flash in manual mode and on full power (1/1). I should be in manual mode, right? If any of the 3 parts ...


2

That fstoppers Flash disc Rafael posted looks pretty neat. Another alternative might be a flash bender. If you don't mind carrying a bit more kit for a bigger light, you could go with a monopod + umbrella holder + umbrella softbox. Quite a bit smaller and lighter when packed up than a proper light stand and softbox. Though still a lot larger and heavier (...


2

If you're actually going to go to the trouble of bringing off-camera lighting gear/triggers with you, then maybe a small softbox could be useful in some situations, but you do need to understand its limitations and limited usefulness, and I'd say don't go any smaller than 8". I use a cheap knockoff of the Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite (22cm). But what might ...


2

The honeycomb makes the light actually harder, larger for the targeted subject, and smaller the further from the target (hope it's clear). On the source side, the angles of the coming light are filtered to a smaller range (hence you can see the honeycomb as a lowpass filter). When you consider an extended subject or a subject in movement, the equivalent of ...


2

What is added by a) the honeycomb A grid modifier limits the spread of the light. Imagine holding a fist full of drinking straws and shining a flashlight through them -- you'd get a beam that spreads very little. The shorter the straws, the more wider the beam can spread. A grid works the same way. & b) the extra depth? A parabolic reflector with ...


2

ND filter and HSS flash both can achieve same results That is a bit oversimplified. ND-filters (ND stands for "Neutral Density", which basically means that they [ideally] filter out equal amounts of all visible wavelengths) simply reduce the amount of total EV that your camera gets - with the same settings than before, your picture will become ...


2

Ambient exposure is controlled by iso, aperture, and shutter speed. But flash exposure is controlled by iso, aperture, flash power, and subject-to-flash distance. If you want to lower the flash power, increase your ISO, open up the aperture, or get closer to your subject. If you balance your flash to be only fill against the ambient (i.e., most of the ...


2

In addition to the Rosco kit you mentioned it might also be worth taking a look at LEE filters. They offer a visual comparison of their diffusion materials. There is also a quite useful comparison of different bounce and diffusion materials by Matt Porwoll. While these demonstrations are mainly intended for larger-scale photographic and cinematographic use,...


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