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In the darkroom, place a piece of the material you will be developing, flat, face up, on the work space. Place a handful of coins on this material. Using a timer, remove a coin every 5 minutes. 12 coins will cover 1 hour. At the end of the time span, develop the film or photo paper. A perfect darkroom will leave no evidence. An unsafe darkroom, reveals ...


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Contrary to some comments here, a 135 film cartridge is very open to water intrusion. The film slot and both spindle holes are designed only to keep out light. The cartridge filled with water in just a few seconds after it was submerged. If you still have a a professional photo lab, preferably one with a darkroom and someone who knows how to use it, I would ...


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If you are talking about locating a light leak in a changing bag for loading film into magazines and cameras without a darkroom available… Periodically, to check the condition of your changing bag, put a bright light inside the bag through one of the sleeves. Close up the bag. Sit in the darkroom or a closet with no light for a few minutes to let your eyes ...


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Generally if film gets wet and then dries, the film will stick to itself. Sometimes it can be saved by pre=soaking in water and separated (difficulty). Prognosis is not good. Some labs may attempt -- lots of work. Best of luck.


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The film is probably fine, but definitely heed rackandboneman's comment about informing a lab about what happened. They may not take your film if it's contaminated. Water is certainly not going to harm film. Detergent probably won't, either. Some detergents contain dyes that could settle on the emulsion or backing and may be harder to remove if the roll ...


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Jargon of photographic chemical mixing and preparation: Concentrate — Chemical that comes bottled in kits and must be diluted. Stock Solution — A chemical that has been mixed from concentrates or powdered formula. This solution must be diluted with water for use. Working Solution — Photo chemicals at the correct concentration for use. As a rule of thumb — ...


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You have two problems. The one you've noticed is water spots remaining on the negatives when the film has been hung to dry. Re-washing and drying may help. It may not remedy the problem if the emulsion side of the film is affected. After the fixer bath, wash longer than you have been to get rid of ALL the fixer that has been absorbed by the emulsion. ...


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A short final wash in distilled water with a wetting agent is always a good practice. Consider Ilford Ilfotol or Tetenal Mirasol or something of the like. Distilled water in development and fixing is not as crucial as in the final wash - unless your tap water is especially hard it should have little effect. The D76 by Kodak is a tolerant soup (if you mix ...


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I highly suggest you check out this book: https://www.amazon.com/Darkroom-Cookbook-Alternative-Process-Photography/dp/1138959189/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_t_0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=7X28P62RGESTJJRKT4MD The history of film development is a long, experimental one. Even today, people continue to experiment, even using coffee to develop the film (https://...


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You can use the same container and mixing utensils and thermometer etc. for mixing. This is valid provided you take care to rinse well between solutions. Also, the items must not be porous (ceramic etc.). If you are in doubt regarding your ability to properly rinse, you can still proceed if containers and utensils are seasoned. To season, save small ...


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I'm pretty late to the game here, but- not knowing if you dried it or not matters a lot. If the film was still wet (swelled gelatin) then we'd probably water bath it and get it into the machine directly, after washing it with photoflo. If it's been dried, however, the lab is going to have to un-reel it and separate the gelatin from sticking, then clean it, ...


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You are basically on the right track. If you have a powder mix, as is common for black and white developers, the different substances are not uniformly distributed, but depending on grain size, density and perhaps even grain shape. It may work, but in general, you can't divide such a powder mix and expect the ratio of the different substances to remain the ...


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Were these posts false Yes. Yes they are. The iconic darkroom safelight is usually red or reddish in color. The reason for this is that the black and white photo paper that one is using to print their negative is sensitive to only blue and green wavelengths of light. This means that you can hold one of those unexposed pieces of paper right in front of a ...


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Tetenal filed for bankruptcy in October 2018 and was closed down by April 1st 2019. Some of the employees have taken over the company and intend to continue production and sale under the name 'New Tetenal'. The new web shop is open for pre-orders, but they have not yet made any statements on when they are intending to deliver. C-41 developer kits for home ...


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If you are setting your meter to ISO 50 while using ISO 100 film and following its recommendations, you're overexposing the film by one stop. If you are then overdeveloping by one stop, your developed negatives will be approximately two stops denser (darker) than nominal. When you scan such negatives and reverse them to positives, the resulting images will ...


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The 30 seconds is "wet time". In other words, you pour in the stop bath (or dunk the film in), this stop bath solution for 30 seconds (time in this solution is not critical). This Adox stop is an indicator stop. In other words, this solution contains an indicator dye that changes the solution to blue (indigo) when exhausted. The rest of the story -- ...


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The rational part of me says that you should go with tfb's answer. But my own laziness has led me to do a lot of stand-dev. If you'd like to experiment, put 5mL of Rodinal in per roll of film at 1:100 ratio. Pre-soak your film for ~2min in water at developing temperature. Dump that and immediately put in your Rodinal. I twist agitate for 1 min at the ...


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When I look this photo I think that something is wrong. It looks a little flat. That's what you want in a negative (or raw digital file) because it can contain the most amount of information all the way from dark to light. But in most cases, you want to add a little contrast when you print it or otherwise prepare it for viewing. In the film age this was ...


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You need to remember that film is a step in the process - it's not the end. Whether you are printing in a darkroom or scanning and editing, you'll be making adjustments to the image and then printing or finalizing for on-screen viewing. When creating the negative, your goal is to compress as much tonal range into it as possible so that your highlights are ...


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It does not entirely do justice to the film, nor reveal potential problems with your developing routine, to judge from the output of a flatbed scanner such as the V800. For a more reliable assessment of negative quality, you should examine the negatives directly. Use a light table and a loupe with ~10x magnification to view the negatives. It takes some time ...


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What happens if you overexpose and over develop (push exposure with push development)? You would get a film that appears doubly "overcooked". Negatives would be dark and dense. Slides would be light and thin. Michael C and Kahovius describe the appearance in more detail. However, Hueco points out that some films, such as Portra, tolerate overexposure with ...


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It looks to my eye like the negatives may have been significantly underexposed or underdeveloped. This resulted in negatives with very little density (they're almost transparent). Then when the negatives were scanned and reversed to give a positive image the lab applied a lot of gain to try and draw something out of the very dark images. Green tint is a ...


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I have a film strip with TMax-400. Out of 36 frames, I pushed 10 of them to ISO 1600. In the future, use the same camera ISO setting for the entire cassette. Push/pull development is done on the entire roll at once, unless you have your own darkroom. If I want it to develop in my local store. How should I instruct them to develop my negatives? First, ...


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Ilfotol and Photo Flo are recommended solutions to use...but not required to use...in film development. They're effectively really, really dilute soaps. My bottle of Photo Flo isn't as old as tfb's - it's going on about 8 years - but I can tell you that it still looks the same, smells the same, has the same consistency, and doesn't have any particles in ...


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Provided your Paterson tank is of type 115 - the one that can take either two 135 or one 120 films - it is the best practice to fill it with 500 ml (or so... can be up to 520 if using Rodinal 1+25 dilution) of developer. You can load the second reel empty, to ensure uniform cover or your film. For most developing situations this is merely a convenience ...


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This will be a personal artistic decision - it is not like one of the developers would work and the other would not. Both are fine, and both are different. Having said that: the typical use case for Rodinal are classical grain films (in Ilford lineup this would mean FP4/HP5+). It is a high acutance developer, producing unmistakably grainy (not unpleasingly ...


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