9

Jargon of photographic chemical mixing and preparation: Concentrate — Chemical that comes bottled in kits and must be diluted. Stock Solution — A chemical that has been mixed from concentrates or powdered formula. This solution must be diluted with water for use. Working Solution — Photo chemicals at the correct concentration for use. As a rule of thumb — ...


7

What you want is called an accordion bottle. These are opaque, plastic bottles shaped like a cylindrical bellows with a cap on one end. To use it, you pour in the liquid to be stored, compress the bottle until the level rises to the top and then install the cap. This customizes the size of the bottle for exactly the amount of liquid in it and eliminates ...


7

I highly suggest you check out this book: https://www.amazon.com/Darkroom-Cookbook-Alternative-Process-Photography/dp/1138959189/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_t_0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=7X28P62RGESTJJRKT4MD The history of film development is a long, experimental one. Even today, people continue to experiment, even using coffee to develop the film (https://...


5

Photographic chemicals are generally robust however they will lose their effectiveness over time. Exactly how long will be their shelf life is a variable. Developers tend to have the shortest shelf life. This is because the developing agents are relatives of benzene which was initially synthesized from coal. These agents have an affinity for oxygen. They ...


4

The general idea with developing film is that one has supplied enough light to the film for a nominal exposure, and in order to take the next step, a chemical reaction must occur to bring out that latent image. What do you think happens if your developer were halfway to exhausted when you used it? You'd get only a partially developed piece of film. So, we ...


4

The problem with photo chemistry is that it changes and becomes unusable. The rate of change is best controlled by limiting the amount of exposure to air and warmth. Control the air by storing in the smallest bottle needed and making sure it has a good seal. Control for warmth by storing at room temp, or even better, in a fridge. I’d say that, yes, you ...


4

The answer is YES: The C-41 color developer is a typical (non-staining) black & white developer. Its job is to differentiate between exposed and non-exposed silver salts present on the film. The developer then goes to work on the exposed silver salts. They are reduced to their two component parts which are silver and an halogen (Iodine – chlorine – ...


4

This will be a personal artistic decision - it is not like one of the developers would work and the other would not. Both are fine, and both are different. Having said that: the typical use case for Rodinal are classical grain films (in Ilford lineup this would mean FP4/HP5+). It is a high acutance developer, producing unmistakably grainy (not unpleasingly ...


3

The best storage will be a brown of green glass filled to the top and capped with little or no air space above the liquid level. Glass is best because it is impervious to air and will not contribute contaminates to the stored solution. As you use the concentrate or stock solution, add clean marbles to maintain a minimum air to fluid junction. Next best is ...


3

You probably could, with some experimentation. However, C41 chemicals are a lot fussier and a lot more expensive than black-and-white chemistry. For only a few dollars (or your equivalent currency), you could buy proper chemicals for black-and-white work, and have well-tested, useful information as to the proper parameters (dilution, development time and ...


3

Rodinal is a good one, my personal favorite. The 100 ml "Baby" Rodinal from Adox is an especially good choice for infrequent developing; the small packaging lasts only for a couple films (whether it is good or ill depends on your volume). Just to give you more options you might consider Ilford HC and / or Kodak HC 110. Both of these (the "difference" ...


2

Agitation time is included in the development time. Assuming you are using a small tank (this type seems to be the most common) the agitation is by inversion. You start your timer, pour the developer in, seal the lid tightly, tap it to your table forcefully (to let the bubbles go) and then proceed to invert the tank for the first 30 seconds. Then invert 3 ...


2

Use Rodinal. The last bottle I emptied had been opened for at least 15 years and kept at room temperature without any protective measurements.


1

On his web site, in a comment on the post Available light: Coney Island at Night Harold Feinstein has supported pushing TRI-X (from 200 to 1600) by developing with Diafine for low light photography.


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