6

Yes, that means that everything is in focus (which implies that the sensor doesn't even need to be a plane).


6

Here is the standard Depth of Field formula for reference: DOF = 2 u2 N C / f2 N = aperture F-number C = circle of confusion u = distance to subject f = focal length When aperture and subject size within the frame are constant, DOF will not change because changes to focal length (f) and distance (u) will be proportional to each other and cancel out. On ...


4

Technique As other answers have already pointed out, the photograph employs an unusual perspective. This is accentuated by its subject matter: the Funkturm is a particularly slender structure with a relatively narrow base, which contributes to the almost vertigo-inducing perspectival effect. Contributing to this "off" feeling is also the fact that very few ...


3

Never forget: depth of field is a myth. The term is a convenient shorthand for a standard of how much defocus is acceptable, and is dependent on the ultimate size of the print or level of magnification in examination, as much as the magnification on the negative or sensor. At the highest resolution examination, even with a very small aperture, the plane of ...


3

László Moholy-Nagy: Hungarian artist (born László Weisz; July 20, 1895 – November 24, 1946) was a Hungarian painter and photographer as well as a professor in the Bauhaus school (wikipedia). Also present at this influential German Art School was Wassily Kandinsky and the first thing that struck me about the picture was the way the composition echoed some ...


2

Distant background blur for a 50mm/F1.8 setting exhibits a blur diameter of 50mm/1.8 as measured in the focus plane. What is "distant"? Well, at double the focus plane distance, you already have half of that diameter. So assuming your wave was in focus, how large would a disk of 27mm diameter swimming in your wave appear in the image? That's the diameter ...


2

When I started in graphic design back in the mid 90s, epson was my printer and scanner of choice. Outstanding results up to 13 x 19. Related to this series of Q&A, I purchased at considerable cost and epson 10000Xl scanner. 48 bit color depth and the ability to scan up flat and sometimes not very flat objects. It would capture up to .25 inches depth of ...


2

You are correct that older scanners are more likely to have a larger DoF, this is because many "old" scanners you can find secondhand are going to have CCD scanning technology which has been phased out in favor of cheaper (and in many use cases better) CIS. Nowadays, CCD technology is mainly found in higher-end "photo scanners" and large-format scanners ...


2

Hyperfocal distance itself doesn't really have anything to do with the lens formula you quote. The formula for hyperfocal distance is (approximate, but good enough in practice): H = f² / (Nc) where: H: hyperfocal distance f: focal length N: f-number (aperture) c: circle of confusion diameter limit (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperfocal_distance) ...


2

"Hyperfocal" refers to the condition where depth of field allows the lens to be "in focus" from some minimum distance to infinity. This depends on a core assumption: the size of the acceptable "circle of confusion," which is determined by the actual aperture diameter and lens focal length, but also by the amount of enlargement the image will receive before ...


2

The clearest image of an object is always when the object is in focus — at the plane of focus. That is, for a given lens of focal length ƒ, when the lens is positioned a distance v from the camera sensor, then an object at distance u from the lens is in focus in accordance with the thin lens approximation, ƒ-1 = u-1 + v-1.


1

Calculation of the equivalent lens range Classically, to calculate the equivalent lens focal range f, you need to use the diagonals (D1, D2) of the two films/sensors to calculate the 'crop factor' k = D1 / D2. The equivalent lens focal range is then given by the formula :f2 = f1 / k In your case (from the clarification part of your question): For 24x36mm ...


1

What follows is not an answer to the question but rather a request for clarification put in this answer section due to the formatting limitations of the comments section. The size of the circle of confusion has nothing to do with the lens but with the size of the sensitive surface (analog film or digital sensor). The circles of confusion (C1, C2) for two ...


1

As to exposure, the lens aperture is unchanged. Your lens is always f/3.5, it is never affected by film size. It is affected by very close macro focus distances (fstop Number = focal length / aperture diameter). As to Field of View, any Equivalent focal length is computed from the diagonal, so it matters if your film is 6x6 cm, 6x7 cm, or 6x9 cm. Assuming ...


1

Your question seems to be based upon an assumption that a human viewer can see the difference between "blurry" and "in focus" at the system limits of a lens system. This is usually far from the case without magnifying the results by a large factor. Can we use the imaging of the convex lens on the screen to explain hyperfocal distance? Not very well. Why? ...


1

Tilt-Shift lenses can isolate the plane of focus to achieve this look. Many of today's cameras have built-in software to create the same isolated focus. Your camera may already have this feature. Look in the manual for "miniature effect". Here is a page from a Canon S110 camera manual:


1

It's a tilt effect. Specialized lenses are made so that the focal plane no longer is parallel to your sensor/film.


1

We could guess how the photographer processed this image. My guess would be sepia toning. It looks like a normal lens was used as thier is little distortion and he held the camera out on a stick or as far as he could reach. The shot does not look planned or composed to me. I strongly believe this image is turned 90 degrees to give the illusion of ...


1

He's used B+W photo obviously, He has a high viewpoint looking down from the tower creating to what I think is a small too big juxtaposition. There is geomtrical element going on with the tower itself and the shadow on the ground give me a sense of how to dominate the tower is. Sure, the image was shot on black and white film, but where do you think that ...


1

This appears to be caused by ring-shaped / bubble / donut bokeh produced by your lens, which has soft or nearly transparent central areas and a strongly defined outer ring. So rather than a soft Gaussian-like blur you might get from more pleasing smooth bokeh, long edges of high contrast (such as the outlines of leaves, branches, etc.) in the background ...


1

The confusion here is caused by the way so many people incorrectly describe what the "shift" function actually does. Shifting the lens does not alter the scene perspective at all, it simply causes the image sensor to be moved to a different part of the image circle being produced by the lens. For example, the Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5L Mark II creates an image ...


1

I have to make a ported application called ExifTool on Android. You can easily download it and try to extract the depth information or export the binary file from a photo. Link download: Exif Tool on Android How to use: Open app. Choose a photo that have Depth Map data. Tap to XMP tab, then see the DepthMap thumbnail, ImageData thumbnail. Tap to DepthMap ...


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