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14

Using Picasa (3.8) it's very easy to either shift or set the date of a batch of photos. And it's cross-platform (Windows, OSX and Linux) and free. And no terminal fiddling... Open Picasa Select your photos Click Tools > Adjust Date and Time Fill in as required (see screenshot)


12

ExifTool is a cross-platform tool which will work from the Windows command line. It is very powerful, with a perl-based syntax allowing comparison of various metadata. In a directory full of JPEG files, this command will print a list of all files where the beginning of the filename does not match the year from the date-taken EXIF value: exiftool -d "%Y" -...


11

Those appear to be codes from a Fuji Frontier automatic film processing lab machine or one of its older predecessors. Such machines were/are popular at mass retailers who did/do one hour photo processing and printing. Users have some leeway in assigning what information is printed using the codes on the back of the print, so there is some variation ...


11

ExifTool is pretty much the Swiss army chainsaw for doing these kinds of things. It has a steep learning curve, but once you're over it, the kind of renaming you're after is a snap: exiftool -d '%Y%m%d-%H%M%%-03.c.%%e' '-filename<CreateDate' . The -d switch tells ExifTool to format dates according to the next argument's pattern. The pattern contains ...


7

As long as you have the filename set as you mention, the command you want to use is exiftool "-PNG:CreationTime<Filename" FileOrDir As @cmason mentions, PNG doesn't support the EXIF standard. Exiftool and Exiv2 do have a workaround, but it isn't widely supported. So EXIF tags won't be set by other programs unless you set them yourself with Exiftool or ...


7

The problem is that the metadata that Windows uses as the "Date Taken" varies by file. For example, for a JPG, Windows will use Exif:DateTimeOriginal if it exists, followed by XMP:DateTimeOriginal, followed by CreateDate, followed by FileCreateDate (the system file create date). (Off topic, if anyone has a link that lists details of all the types of files ...


7

No. PNG does not support EXIF. In fact, lack of a standardized metadata block is one of its big disadvantages for photography. If you need a lossless format which preserves (very-similar-to-EXIF, since it's the basis for EXIF) metadata, try TIFF. The downside, though, is that TIFF rendering support is not as widespread as that for PNG (for web applications ...


6

The internal clock in a camera requires power to keep running. In some cameras, the clock runs off a separate battery from the main one. This secondary clock battery (often a small button cell) may have died and needs to be replaced. For an example of this type of battery replacement, see the ifixit.com guide on replacing the clock battery in a Canon ...


6

EXIF v2.31 (p49) defined time-zone offset fields in 2016 and the XMP time-zone guidelines (p33-34) also consider time-zones. The implementation in cameras and programs is rather minimalist at the moment. See also my answer to an older question: What do you do with your camera clock time in relation to time zones?


5

CIPA DC- 008 is the standard for Exif 2.2. Of note it makes no mention of "timezone." "GMT" is also not mentioned either. The term "UTC" does appear but only specifies the GPS time is recorded as such. Pedants may note that this is slightly misleading since GPS time is not identical to UTC My point, in short, is that omission of timezone is likely not ...


5

Yes — either ExifTool or Exiv2 will do this and can work on RAW files, including CR2. And they work on Linux, Mac, or Windows.


5

Photo metadata, such as EXIF metadata, is written into a RAW, TIFF, or JPEG file in a data section which sits alongside the image (pixel) data. Data can be added, edited, or removed without affecting the image data. In theory it's possible to embed data (usually a copyright watermark) inside the image data, but a professional photographer is unlikely to use ...


5

For simple things where the flexibility, power, and complication of ExifTool aren't necessary, I like to use the tool jhead. It's a command-line tool available for Linux, Mac, and Windows. jhead -n%Y%m%d-%H%M%S *.jpg will automatically rename all files ending in .jpg in the current directory to a format like 20181226-111141.jpg. You can use %f to also ...


4

This is very helpful, it shows many available tools: http://petapixel.com/2012/11/05/how-to-fix-your-timestamps-if-you-forgot-to-update-your-camera-for-daylight-savings/ namely how to use Adobe Lightroom, Picasa, Jhead, ExifTool and Exifer to shift the date. Personally I use ExifTool, and Exiv2, which works on MacOSX to do the following in the terminal: ...


3

Simple answer: you can't prove anything. A (digital) photo is just a sequence of ones and zeros (bits) on a disk somewhere, and anyone with enough time, money and dedication could get those bits to say anything they wanted.


3

There's no way to assign a date-based filename on-camera. However, there are quite a few pieces of software that will help do just this when ingesting photos from the memory card to your computer, giving you the ability to define your preferred file name, folder structure, and assorted metadata, too, such as Adobe Lightroom and Camera Bits Photo Mechanic.


3

The number is called a "twin check". A number was assigned the roll of film. Usually assigned in the order opened at the sorting table. The prints made from that roll are given the same number. The 3R stands for 3X enlargement rectangular. This is likely a 3 1/2 x 5 inch print.


2

Basically, the command would be something like this ExifTool "-TAG<Directory" <DIR or FILE> assuming that the directory structure is numeric e.g. 2015/07/04 But there may be problems depending upon the exact tag you want to use. Many date/time tags require a time as well as a date and I believe all the EXIF date/time tags fall into this category. ...


2

EXIF tag DateTime is the data and time that the image was last modified and will be rewritten if the image is moved from one directory to another. EXIF Tag DateTimeOriginal is the capture data and time. My application GPS Essentials only writes out to DateTime and not DateTimeOriginal and this was the source of my confusion.


2

Using the print size or border style seems like a long shot to me. That could be influenced by film brand, paper brand, chosen print lab and country, let alone time frame. If you do get a time frame, you're more likely to get a decade than a year. That said, antiques or forensics experts may be able to guide you.


2

You could try the (free) PyExifToolGUI which is a actually a frontend for the command line tool ExifTool. I don't know if the Windows installer needs you to install ExitTool (and several Python packages) separately. The linked page has details of the manual and installation. I have it on my system and you can select one or multiple files and set ...


2

Thanks all but I ended up using AmoK EXIF Sorter, a free app that does it all simply, quickly and effectively.


1

There are no provisions for time zones in the EXIF standard, just a year, month, day, hours, minutes, seconds and a null character to end it. Some timezone-aware cameras include an offset in the maker-specific data, and it would be up to the software to understand, extract and correct it. I suspect that whatever you're using to inspect the EXIF data is ...


1

You can actually provide several hints toward authenticity of date of creation. You have several timestamps: creation of file modification of file, and last read of file, but also a timestamp of creation of image in its EXIF metadata (data that is not image but that comes along with the image, and all of these are parts of the file), and eventually an IPTC ...


1

Any method for demonstrating that the edited photo came from a particular original, or that the original was taken at a particular time or date, must be predicated on the evaluator being a rational person. Therefore, the first and perhaps only necessary step here is to find a new boyfriend. That said, there's usually a lot more metadata connected to an ...


1

You can't really prove the date, but you can prove the photo is identical to the original photo, except for the shadowing. Quickly flip between those two photos and it would be obvious that not a slightest detail changes. Anyone trusting the original photo must admit it would not be possible to take another photo using exactly the same pose and exactly the ...


1

Codes like this on the rear of photo prints had a different intended purpose to Exif data in your digital photos. When prints were made, oftentimes there were "corrections" applied, to adjust colours, exposure, etc. The point of the code on the rear of the print was so that if the customer returned for a reprint, the corrections could be replicated so that ...


1

After some more googling and looking around I found jhead http://www.sentex.net/~mwandel/jhead/ Windows users: download the "Pre-built Windows executable" jhead.exe and place it into the folder with your photos. This is how you change the date taken on all photos in the folder by a defined time span (as documented on the website) (my photos were ACTUALLY ...


1

PNG does not support EXIF in its file format. There are ways to add certain data, knowns as 'chunks' but I don't see 'date taken' specifically in the standard. My recommendation is to convert all to JPG, then use EXIF tool or Lightroom to add date taken info. If you use a Mac, there is most likely an Apple script available.


1

Does anybody have any good links to share that might be helpful? Different service providers will likely have their own specific codes, so you should take them on a case-by-case basis. In each case, be sure to check the backs of any prints you might have: some processors print dates and other identifying information on the back of photos. For your Costco ...


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