26

There are several ways in which an SD card can go bad. Physical Damage First, cards can be actually physically broken. You can bend them in half pretty easily if you try, but in general they're actually pretty resilient. Many are effectively water-proof even if not marketed that way. I've sent cards through the laundry, and once I dropped one full of ...


20

Well, for one thing, all photos larger than 16 megapixels are resized to 16 MP — so, for many cameras today, that's an immediate, obvious drop in resolution. But all other photos are compressed too, using an optimizing compression algorithm. I don't think Google comes out and says exactly what they do, but it's probably their open source Guetzli algorithm. ...


17

I'm not going to worry too much about how this happens, because hard disks will fail; just like anything else in this world, they aren't perfect. You can't get to a state where you're never going to lose a file. However, you can get to a state where you never lose a photo - you do this by having multiple copies on separate hard drives, including at least ...


17

There are two main causes. The first is data degradation. Bits stored on magnetic media (such as your hard disk) can lose their magnetic orientation over time, corrupting the bit. In harsher conditions (high heat and humidity) the physical media itself can start to degrade. For solid state media such as an SSD, the mechanism is different but the outcome is ...


6

The best option, and one which I use myself, is two fold. I've done this for a couple years now, and while at times it is tedious, it is the only way I actually feel safe about my LARGE photography library (~40,000 RAW photos, averaging around 23mb each) as well as my growing library of edited photos, photos sized for web publishing, photos sized for various ...


6

Never backup just at home. All backup solutions have some chance of failure including the loss, theft, fire, floods and natural disasters. There should be two copies in two different physical locations at all times. So, even if you make the backups at home, be prepared to take one elsewhere. Mine duplicates go in a safe at the bank. For the highest volumes ...


6

Short Answer : you may be lucky ! As you supposed, it seems that you have indeed experienced some corruption(s) during the transfer. Technically speaking, a JPG is made of tiny blocks of pixels called "MCU block" (Minimum Coded Unit). In the case of your image, the MCU has the size of 16*8 pixels (regular sizes are 8*8, 8*16 and 16*8). As one can see in ...


6

They are basically throwing processing power at the problem, using very compute intensive approaches that tries out various ways to compress the image within the JPG rules. Processing is something google likely has plenty of, especially as it also saves bandwdith. You can do the same - the software and various services are free or cheap. Your program / ...


5

File deletion essentially means removing file entry from file system (file system contains information about all location and size of all files on disc or memory card). If something goes wrong file system may become corrupted, rendering card inaccessible (all the data may be still there, but without filesystem you can't tell where one file begins and another ...


5

In general, if you want to keep your data longer than the 4-5 year average life span of a hard drive, you need at least two copies on two different devices. Ideally, those devices should be in different physical locations. The trick is mostly to have the backups run automatically, so you don't forget it. I recommend Crashplan, it's the simplest and most ...


5

That's not pink — that's magenta. The difference is significant because magenta is the mix of blue and red primaries, with no green. That implies that the green channel information for that part of the file is damaged. But also, it's pretty clear that most of the image is messed up far beyond beyond that. I'd write this one off as not salvageable. If you ...


5

The image was corrupted by random bytes of information being lost in the data transfer. You can tell because each time information is lost, the image shifts (because pixels end up missing as it fills each line). It's also not an even number of pixel information since some of the times that information is lost, it causes the color information to get shifted ...


5

There may not be a definitive answer. Some arguments for using fewer, larger cards: Less card swapping. When using small cards, you could potentially miss the shot because you have to swap cards. Lower chance of user error. If you have a dozen cards then keeping track of formatted cards, used cards, backed-up cards... is a disaster waiting to happen. And ...


4

Based on your description of the problem, it sounds like the card in question may have a bad block that isn't being masked out by the card's controller. Since most flash cards use some type of wear leveling, the problem will only occur each time the controller attempts to access the bad block. If the card is, for example, an 8GB card that is re-formatted ...


4

Since neither Windows nor the camera can read the card, I think the most likely scenario is that the changes Windows were about to write to the card were interrupted halfway through. Such interruptions will corrupt a file system for sure, and could happen if you just unplug the card instead of going through the Windows "safely remove hardware and eject ...


4

It most definitely is a image sensor/CCD/CMOS issue. These tend to fail over time due to heat, which could explain why it worked the first couple of months. It also isn't exposing properly (due to faulty CCD) hence the swirls and exposure of half a second. There was a time where they recalled their image sensors/CCDs but it was a while ago. It might be ...


4

If your intention is to modify the JPEG file by changing some bytes inside it, just do the following: convert JPEG to uncompressed BMP change the bytes convert BMP to JPEG


4

What you're seeing is consistent with data corruption in that the preview lo-res jpeg is fine, and that the compressed raw has a number of incorrect or missing bytes causing corruption. The question Why do images get "corrupted"? describes the effect at the file level. Use of a different file format (raw rather than jpeg) will give you different ...


4

Try a web search for "Hex editor". There are several around, including some free ones. They can display the values of the bytes making up the file as (ususally) hexadecimal (base 16) values - each 8 bit byte shows as 2 hexadecimal digits. Some may also allow you to display the values as octal (base 8) or binary (base 2). As with most editors, you can search ...


3

There are generally two reasons for corruption... The card is faulty. Cards are so cheap relative to cameras that there is no excuse not to follow the 'if in doubt, throw it out' mantra and then you can replace them with cards that do have a warranty. If cards fail it's normally the 'controller' that fails and it will be completely inaccessible. The card ...


3

One of the things I most love about digital photography over traditional film photography is how easy it is to have a backup. If my house burns down, my slides are gone forever but all of the digital photos are safe. Because of how easy it is to have a backup, and how cheap it is, I have many backups. Primary storage: roughly the most recent year is kept ...


3

No it doesn't. Lately I had a corruped one (see my post on Lightroom is not showing Photo correctly) and LR didn't mention anything.


3

An important detail that hasn't been mentioned thus far is how file deletion is (usually) done on SSDs. It is different than the traditional, spinning-disk, hard disk drives (HDDs). As mentioned in AJ's answer, traditionally when you "delete" a file the operating system (Windows 8 in this case) simply tells the hard drive that the file is no longer needed ...


3

Your first photos look pretty dramatic, but I think that's actually mostly a side effect of something other than the problem — you are doing it on purpose. I don't mean maliciously, but those are clearly examples where the weird artifacts are combined with a long shutter speed in order to make an interesting abstract effect. The "skeleton" image may be a ...


3

I know that when you repeatedly remove/insert an SD card it can leave "lines" on the gold contacts of the SD card itself but I haven't had any issue with it for over a year (if I'm understanding what you're saying.) Not all SD cards do this and if you're curious check this post out. As for the camera messing up the card itself, do you have any other SD Card ...


3

You've tested with multiple cards/readers. That's definitely indicative of a problem with the camera itself. Some additional tests are:- plug a cable into the camera directly. copy the files to a different machine. You might have a USB problem there that you didn't know about. view the nef using different software (for example ViewNX.) copy the same ...


3

Can I keep using a corrupted SD card? Well, you could. But you might not like the results from doing so. Based on the rest of your description, though, before you toss the card you probably need to establish that the card, and not something else, is the actual source of the problem. Here's a checklist of things you should look at: How was the card ...


2

It sounds like your photos may be fragmented, hence the grey areas making the images appear corrupted. Try Adroit Photo Recovery, which can take fragmented photos and stitch them back together. It's not free, though it is free to try to see if it works (and something like 20 bucks for a 7 day use, which is actually pretty cheap compared to some of the ...


2

Before resorting to software try using a POWERED USB hub. The additional amperage (I know that sounds like an overstatement) or stronger (not higher) voltage makes the images easier to read. I discovered this effect making repeated copies (or attempts to make copies) of an 18 Gb set of jpg.s on a 32Gb compact flash. The card is a new Sandisk Extreme. It ...


2

I haven't had much luck recovering the raw files themselves, but I've seen several instances of problems like this where I was able to extract the JPG preview that's embedded in the RAW file. Believe it or not, the best program I've found for grabbing these JPGs is Irfanview - a great little free tool. Any JPG you grab in this fashion won't be of the same ...


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