33

In the darkroom, place a piece of the material you will be developing, flat, face up, on the work space. Place a handful of coins on this material. Using a timer, remove a coin every 5 minutes. 12 coins will cover 1 hour. At the end of the time span, develop the film or photo paper. A perfect darkroom will leave no evidence. An unsafe darkroom, reveals ...


31

Make negatives specifically for the course: Ask yourself what you want to actually teach in your class, and come up with negatives to function as aids to those lessons. If all the students are going to learn is how to mix chemistry, expose photo paper, and what order/timing to dunk the sheets in the tanks, then why on earth is anyone Paying for that when ...


20

If you are talking about locating a light leak in a changing bag for loading film into magazines and cameras without a darkroom available… Periodically, to check the condition of your changing bag, put a bright light inside the bag through one of the sleeves. Close up the bag. Sit in the darkroom or a closet with no light for a few minutes to let your eyes ...


14

This looks to me as if you have botched loading the film onto the spiral, so that two wraps of the film were touching or very close to each other. When that happens you tend to get marks on the negs where developer hasn't really reached them properly. (I tend to get this with 5x4 negs processed in a mod54: huge negs like that are very flexible so if you ...


7

Yes, they can. The darkroom I work in uses the strips of red LEDs you can get to put in car rear windows, all run from a 12 volt supply, as safelights and they work brilliantly. I believe that fairly extensive tests were done before I joined: leaving paper out for hours & then checking for fogging. I'd encourage anyone planning on doing this to do ...


5

A big fun factor in seeing the darkroom at work for the first time (and all other times) is seeing your own image appearing on the paper So... Let them have fun then! There are several projects they can do without taking the source images themselves, for example, a photo collage. Let them expose several images together. Let them make masks with cardboard, ...


5

Before making assumptions on monochromaticity with LED lights that aren't built for this purpose, test and/or measure. LEDs are often overdriven, and/or allowed to get reasonably hot, and/or used in pulsed modes in these applications. All this can affect their spectral behaviour (compared to datasheet values) a lot.


4

To achieve an equitable color balance, it is necessary to present the paper with a spot-on mix of red, green and blue exposing light energy sourced from the projected image of the negative. If the exposing light mix be biased as to color or intensity, substandard print results. Now the vast majority of images contain substantial neutral areas, we are ...


4

Were these posts false Yes. Yes they are. The iconic darkroom safelight is usually red or reddish in color. The reason for this is that the black and white photo paper that one is using to print their negative is sensitive to only blue and green wavelengths of light. This means that you can hold one of those unexposed pieces of paper right in front of a ...


3

If the purpose of the course is to give your students an experience of the darkroom in one day then I would stick with cameraless photography, i.e. photograms, and not worry about making negatives with a camera. There is just no way to teach iso, aperture, shutter speed, metering, developing regimes, etc in a single day. If this class has no prerequisites ...


3

Adding a top coat of hot liquid paraffin is in the "how to do it books" for storage of photo chemicals. I did this 50+ years ago in my home darkroom in the water heater closet. Better is adding clean marbles or using plastic storage bottles and squeezing the air out. I have used nitrogen filled bottles. I have used nitrogen filled storage tanks. I have used ...


3

The unmixed powders, such as XTOL or D-76, in their original sealed packaging can be expected to last several years. However, with age does come increased risks of issues. If the powder remains as fine grains and pours smoothly, then that is a good sign that there were no issues in storage. If it is clumpy, has uneven texture or colours, then treat with ...


3

Will the pixels be visible ? Will the thickness of the screen glass prevent the image from being in focus ? Some resin-based 3D printers work on a similar principle: an LCD monitor mounted under the transparent bottom of a tank holding light-sensitive resin exposes the resin and causes it to solidify. There's no doubt that you could make a contact print by ...


3

Beware of red LEDs that are based on blue LED chips + red phosphor, they may still emit a fair amount of blue light. I don't know how many there are out there, just saying. Same for amber/yellow LEDs, they may be fantastic, or they may be useless. https://www.google.com/search?q=led+darkroom+safelight = 42100 results.


3

Several comments on your idea: in an ideal setup you should have zero initial vibrations - the timer and enlarger are connected only electronically. Your pressing of a switch (or foot pedal in some cases) should not have any impact. If it does stabilize your enlarger - a good idea is fixing your center column to the wall. by setting too narrow aperture on ...


2

The normal developing time for print paper is 60 thru 90 seconds. If your developing time is very short, your results will be flat prints (lacking contrast no true blacks). Fist, examine your negatives in good light. If you hold them over a newspaper, you should be just able to see newsprint. If not, they are too dark and thus over-exposed. OK, let’s set ...


2

The nearest experience that I have with this idea is this Fuji Instax Printer. I think it's a good stand in as the resolution is alright. Here's an original iPhone image: And here's the Instax version: The increase in warmth and contrast is probably due to the Instax film's properties over the screen. But, there's a visible decrease in sharpness, ...


2

This is almost purely anecdotal, but... I recently (3/2019) bought a bag of XTOL which has the following markings: © 2016 Kodak Alaris Inc. EXP: 2021-05 From this I gather that Kodak gives a shelf life of 2–5 years for unmixed, unopened XTOL. (Not sure whether the copyright statement indicates year of manufacture or something else.) However, word ...


2

In old-school darkroom classes, contact prints straight from silhouette-giving objects were not an uncommon exercise (exposing them with an un-loaded enlarger). One possibility might be renting, acquiring, or improvising a digital enlarger (that can project a digital image onto photo paper). Such devices exist, but for experimental results, it might be well ...


1

Do you have a large format camera? If so, set up a studio portrait area, pre-lit etc but let them click the shutter to photograph each other, or whatever else they might like on orthochromatic film. Then you can develop the negs in trays under a safelight, just like you were planning to do for paper, and make contact prints with them after lunch. If you ...


1

Make with them a few pinhole cameras (cans or boxes) to shoot on photosensitive paper. It’s great fun and you’ll teach them how to take and develop their own BW pictures with little equipment at home. Let them take some long exposure pictures. Teach them how to develop the photosensitive resin paper under safe light to get a negative of the image. Teach ...


1

Chances are the material you used is no longer made. However you could just use film, assuming you are working from negs with an enlarger in the normal way. In particular if you can find an orthochromatic sheet film this would be suitable. Ilford make one which is available in sheets up to 8x10 generally and 10x12 by special order. Because it's ...


1

It's likely that your problem is due to the interaction with the LED and the power transformer. A more expensive (probably much more expensive) transformer will likely smooth this out. The enlarger itself is relatively simple and I don't see anything about it where age would cause a problem like this. So, this isn't really a photographic problem, more a ...


1

Stopping down about 2 f-stops will likely deliver the highest acuity. Stopping down all the way will likely degrade due to the twin demons of interference and diffraction. I recommend composing with the lens wide-open and then stopping down 2 f-stops and then refocusing. The re-focus corrects focal length shift that likely occurred when you stopped down. ...


1

Yes. In the 1970s, you probably used the EP-2 chemistry system and paper. This system was long ago replaced by the RA-4 system, which works fairly similarly but is incompatible. You won't have to change your working methods much, if you remember what those methods were.


1

As you dial in higher and higher values for any of three dichroic glass filters, it will be necessary to apply a correction (filter factor that increases exposure). I can provide approximate values but there are many valuables therefor you will need to run your own tests. Enlarging exposure meters are available however you can use most any exposure meter, ...


1

I've gone through this. It is possible -- the images will be way to soft because of the thickness of the glass. It is also possible to put your phone into an enlarger that can enlarge 6x7 or 4x5 negatives. The phone becomes the light source, generally you have to crank up the brightness. There are straight forward ways to convert your screen to a "...


1

That is not very affordable... You would need to have a projector of more than 8K resolution, and that only gives you 7680×4320px, or like 33Mpx. A normal projector is only FullHD, this is 1920x1080. You could take an 8K monitor and take a photo, for example using black and white film. There were digital to film printers, but they were extremely ...


1

For my black and white processing I use a large washing up bowl half full with water. A 100w aquarium heater/thermostat and a separate imersive digital thermometer for accuracy. Our darkroom setup is in the garden and can be quite cold at times. 20mins standing in the heated 20C water keeps the chemicals just fine. I stand the film container in there too ...


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