5

The process you are describing is commonly referred to as culling images. Any modern photo editing suite will have features to help you accomplish this far more efficiently than a standard file explorer. What works the fastest for me is Photo Mechanic from Camera Bits, Inc. It is extremely fast at viewing full size RAW files without any need to ...


3

When you die, your next-of-kin is going to eye all your photos, and close relative as she/he is, it is going to be a deeply emotional trip through your life. Been there, done that, did not like the T-shirt too much. But, at digital age, there will be a gazillion photos on all those drives and backup disks that you keep filling up one after another. Nobody ...


2

I think if you're working professionally, leave the deleting until after the client has signed off. Yes, there may be some photos you will obviously never use but it's always good to stay safe and keep the ones that aren't total rejects. If you delete a photo that was only marginally unpleasant you can never get it back in case it's needed (whatever reason ...


2

There is no simple answer other than: 1) when i doubt, keep the image 2) if the image could ever be of any use or has any memories attached, keep But else? Some people might keep 10 brilliant shots, others might have 1000 bad ones... Having said that, keeping slightly more than necessary is easy enough to do with today's harddrives.


2

My process is the following: First I sort out all technically bad photos. I often take multiple pictures of a scene using different settings, perspective, or just to make sure that everybody smiles and has open eyes :-) So in case there are still multiple good pictures of a scene, I pick the best and delete the rest. At this point, usually a third of the ...


2

I delete 8/10 of the photos I take. Those 8 would just end up on a hard drive anyway, and no one, including myself, would ever see them.


2

I use Lightroom so I answer for that. In LightRoom, I can tag them with something, and later select only tagged ones. Instead of tagging arbitrary photos, try the survey view. With the filmstrip as the only other module visible, you can quickly select a group of images to compare them. Pick your winner and go on to the next selection. You can enhance ...


1

Divide and conquer. You're obviously shooting a lot of shots of a given subject. Let's break things down a bit. Trip 5 zillion pix. Instead Trip Day 1 Day 2 ... Now here's a new concept: For each day, we will have a number of subjects Trip Day 1 Cathedral at Cologne A step further, a given subject with have one or more ...


1

XnViewMP is a freeware advanced viewer which will store all metadata in sidecar XMP files (supported by other programs like Bridge and Lightroom) and has colour labels and ratings and hotkeys. If you need to transfer the "selection" you will need to select your source folders and "update files from catalog" to store metadata permanently in .xmp files. It ...


1

For managing larger collections, 25,000 - 250,000 photos, you just can't beat DBGallery (www.DBGallery.com). It's software I helped build over the past 5 years or so. There's no side car files. It stores the data directly in the file and also in it's database for speedy searches. It's tagging and search support is excellent, and has numerous other tools ...


1

I found that over the years I accumulated a large number of family photos which I hadn't sorted out - I'd just copied them off the cameras and phones etc. and never sorted out the good photos from the fuzzy, blurred or eyes closed. So to sort them out (the good from the bad) I created vsPhotoSorter - step through each photo, tag the good, skip the bad, ...


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