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Can someone tell me how could I make my photos Creative Commons? Creative Commons is an organization that has created and maintains a number of different licenses for sharing content. They also have a set of instructions for how to get started choosing a license and applying it to your work. You should also check the competition rules to find out exactly ...


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As @coneslayer notes, Creative Commons does indeed provide guidance for XMP information. The main thing is to set xmpRights:UsageTerms to This work is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by­sa/2.0/ verify at http://example.com/pdf­metadata.html That "verify" link is optional ...


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You can use pretty much any license you want — but make sure the image really is CC0. There are a wide array of Creative Commons licenses meant to cover different situations. CC0 is special — it is a "No Rights Reserved" declaration. It exists because not all jurisdictions have a clear way to dedicate something to the public domain, even if you ...


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Whoever is going to use the image needs permission from both the model (for their likeness) and the photographer (for their copyright). In some circumstances (mainly journalism, but I believe there is one or two other exceptions) a model release is not required, in which case only the license for copyright is required. Disclaimer: seek photographic advice ...


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I have posted some hdr source files packs on my DA account. Each pack consists of a number of lossless TIFF images for use in the making of a hdr image. Here is a link to the packs: HDR Source Pack Link


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Use exiftool to add exif metadata easily from console. It is easy to install, already present in popular Linux distros (e.g. Ubuntu) $ exiftool -by-line="[your name]" -CopyrightNotice="© [your name] ; \ Licence: Creative Commons cc-by-nc 3.0 United States \ (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/)" \ -artist="[...


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Such standards are usually up to the discretion of the publisher / reprinter, possibly subject to certain limitations, restrictions, or specification by the licensor. This allows for some creativity on the part of the person/organization licensing the photo to create a unified style for their publication. Associated Press: immediately following the caption, ...


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CC0 has no copyleft provision. So if you use CC0 material in a work, CC0 doesn’t automatically apply to this work. You may apply any license you want (or no license). You could even apply a license to unmodified CC0 material. So if you combine two CC0 images into a new image, you can do whatever you want with this new image (except claiming that you are the ...


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In general, attribution type depends how and where the photos are used. For printed material, like books: the photographer should receive proper credit for his work: his name and all image titles released under "Creative Common Attribution Share Alike 3.0". However, it doesn't need to be on the same page. It can be by the end of the book, with the page ...


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I imagine it could depend on jurisdiction, but I think you are generally correct that the copyright is the right to reproduce a particular image and that the model/likeness rights have to do with if the image can be used in a particular way due to content. If you had a release from the model for the image though, then I think that would effectively wave the ...


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