25

Upon viewing his portfolio at the link you provided, my first thought was push processing. In push processing, one typically underexposes the shot (that is, meters and set exposure as if the the film were a higher ISO than it really is), then compensate in the darkroom by overdeveloping the film to account for the underexposed shot. Push processing tends to ...


21

I think your manager is right, and that this phenomenon is much more widespread than just photos for social media, or even photography in general. Take a look in supermarkets, and take in the flashy bright colours and stark contrasts brands use to attract your attention. If they get you to look at their product, chances of you buying it shoot up ...


14

There are two kinds of contrast the review might be talking about. Despite sharing a name, they're really two different concepts (isn't language awesome?). They both might be related to aperture, though, so without context, it's hard to guess which. The first is micro contrast, which is explained in detail at What is "micro contrast" and how is it different ...


11

Up to a point, yes. As this answers explains very well. On the other hand, there is a point at which one enters the area of "too much of a good thing!". Here's the full article rom which the above image was linked: 7 Deadly Photo Editing Sins That Could Ruin Your Images.


10

The question, as it is asked, does not rule out this approach:


10

Veiling glare is light that's not intended to be part of the image, per se, but ends up on the recording medium (film or sensor) anyway. It's caused by reflections and scattering of light by optical elements and the lens barrel. This produces an overlay of general brightness, which raises what should be the darkest parts, reducing overall image contrast. ...


10

Hello this is Renato D’Agostin. By chance I found myself on this blog, and found curious and flattering to read comments about my photography. I thought it could be nice to comment myself. Regarding the way I shoot, I am very basic. I do indeed use a Leica M6, but mostly a Nikon F100. Some of my favorite and most relevant shots where taken with a 50euros F60 ...


8

Yes, your assumption is correct. A levels control is basically the equivalent of a curves control that can only be adjusted at the end points and one point in the middle, while a contrast slider is (usually) the equivalent of moving both ends at the same time (although some may be more sophisticated). The curves tool gives the most flexibility, but also ...


8

It doesn't straight answer your question but I'd say your supervisor is correct on this one. MKBHD did a blind test comparison between smartphones and the result is exactly this theory. The flashiest and most saturated photos always were considered better, even being of lower quality. It's the sad reality we live in.


6

There is no equivalent. These scales are completely arbitrary and not measured in any unit! There are no step sizes and no real limits, for example: Some cameras let you go from -2 to +2, -5 to +5, 0 to 9 or even non-numeric scales like high to low. Note that these parameters are subject to interpretation. For example, there are dozens of ways to sharpen ...


6

I do not know the details, but do not underestimate the power of makeup. Normally this kind of photos have a lot of pre-production work. Just a tip, "back in the days" of film photography there was a film called "lith" for example Kodak's Kodalith, that produced a totally contrasted image, with almost no middle tones. This is not the case because you can ...


6

You could change contrast of individual channel by curves. I'm not sure if this is what you want though, because it will throw out the image color balance. Instead of changing contrast you can change lightness or saturation. This can be easily done in LR - there is a set of individual HSL color sliders for that. If you still want to change contrast and ...


6

In short, everything about color has a psychological meaning or response: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28612080 Oversaturated images tend to grab our attention and there is both a trend for them and backlash as far as art is concerned (Why are vibrant, saturated photos considered 'not as good'?). But, Social Media is not art, it is all ...


5

What you call originals are the preview jpegs created in-camera and attached to the raw file. These are the images that will have Auto Lighting Optimizer applied. Lightroom displays these preview thumbnails while it is waiting for your computer to generate a high quality preview of the raw file based on the current Lr settings. Once your computer has ...


5

You can run multiple filters to bring out the text. Depending on how unimportant the stone itself is, you can take it to some significant extremes. The ultimate key is to reduce noise, as that's largely what makes the text difficult to read (Michael's image is an example of that). Here are a few filters, applied one after the other and possibly to new layers,...


4

If you open the image with any editor, you can see in the histogram (below) that it only uses (in a significant proportion) 12 of the 255 available brightness levels. This means that it only has 12 shades to represent the image that it captured. Switching to the logarithmic histogram, you can see that actually there is more, but the most significant part, ...


4

I look at them kind of like sandpaper for a woodworking project: The Contrast slider is the really coarse paper that you use to get in the ballpark of the final shape you want, the Levels sliders are like a medium grit that allows you to fine tune the shape and get closer to your goal, and then the Curves allow the finest control like a really fine grain ...


4

Yes I would agree the left image has more contrast, for two reasons. The main one is that because the right image is underexposed, there is lost detail in the blacks and the highlights don't extend to the edge of the histogram, so no pure whites, while the first image covers the full extent between 0-255. Also there is a larger peak in both the shadows and ...


4

The "issue" here is white balance. It has nothing to do with the lens. It is up to how each camera decides to treat the light. The human eye adapts to light temperature, but a camera has to decide what of all the things in a frame is white/neutral grey/black and set the rest of the colours accordingly. Play with the white balance settings on the camera. If ...


4

Haze or flare will reduce the contrast of a scene. That's why lens designers work to minimize it. Introducing it in a controlled way will accomplish what you wish. You can use an air-space between two plano thin lenses and place that into the light path of your system where a normal optical filter is placed. It would introduce flare to reduce the contrast ...


4

This supplement to mattdm's answer contains a series of images to illustrate the effect that coating technology can have on veiling glare. They were all taken handheld with the camera set to the same settings with auto exposure enabled. There is a lamp shining toward the camera just outside the frame in the upper-left corner. All lenses were set to cover ...


4

Your lighting will be flat, which is expected based upon your lighting setup. If you shoot RAW, your processing time and storage needs will increase dramatically. So be certain to know how this will impact your workflow and your future budget for asset storage. But you will have the highest resolution and the greatest processing capabilities when shooting ...


4

Here's your main problem: Your camera can't tell the difference between a black cat in a coal mine and a white cat in a blizzard. If you point the camera at either and half-press the shutter to meter, it assumes you want whatever you are pointing at to be medium grey. If you want a white item in your photograph to look white, you need to increase the ...


4

Short answer: No, you do not need to buy filters. Long answer: Unless you already have a dichroic head head with built in filters, you may want to go ahead and buy the Ilford filter pack anyway if you want to make use of the contrast control. [Multigrade paper is usable without filters. The filters just give you more control/choices from the same paper ...


4

What curves do photographers use when modifying the contrast of their photographic images?¹ The vast majority don't do their own curves programmatically, which seems to be what you are seeking. Instead, most start with a "canned" default curve, such as your example of y = a*x + b, applied by their chosen raw processing application, and then either ...


4

You need to manipulate the camera tools to achieve the look you want for your subject. The exposure of an image applies across the entire image frame. It isn't selective. If you expose the image for something that is really bright (the flowers, which have high illumination) then the rest of the image (in this case the background) will appear dark. By ...


3

Seems to me like you are dealing with atmospheric conditions that limit absolute image quality. The closer objects(what little exist) in your images look just fine. Do you have any images with subjects that are less than 100ft away primarily? I am also wondering about the surface temperature when these were shot, it may simply be too hot for sharp images. ...


3

Notice the blown highlights, and in the top example at least, the clipped shadow detail. This indicates the contrast was increased to the point that both the dark and light ends, but particularly the light end, was clipped. It helps to start with subjects that have large light areas that you actually want to have clipped to full white. Examples are the ...


3

Short Answer: Reduce the exposure time. Long Answer: The process you're dealing with one where that light from your subject strikes the paper and causes a reaction in the emulsion on the paper, then the developer reacts with the emulsion in the paper to turn it black. How long that process takes is a function of three things: Exposure. More light makes ...


3

Samuel, as some of the other answers have suggested, layer masks are very useful for this sort of thing. I wish I had learnt about layer masks earlier in my journey (and you may already have done so given the age of this question!) But in case it's useful to others who land here, here is my explanation of layer masks, and how they can be used in this ...


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