21

I think your manager is right, and that this phenomenon is much more widespread than just photos for social media, or even photography in general. Take a look in supermarkets, and take in the flashy bright colours and stark contrasts brands use to attract your attention. If they get you to look at their product, chances of you buying it shoot up ...


14

There are two kinds of contrast the review might be talking about. Despite sharing a name, they're really two different concepts (isn't language awesome?). They both might be related to aperture, though, so without context, it's hard to guess which. The first is micro contrast, which is explained in detail at What is "micro contrast" and how is it different ...


11

Most commonly, you used paper with different contrast grade. There are fixed grade papers, normally available in grade 0 to grade 5. There are also variable grade papers (aka Multigrade), where you change the contrast with different filters that gave different colors. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photographic_paper#Contrast_control


11

Here's a quick and simple way to do it. Your source image is 640 x 480 and a bit hazy so there is no reason to use a more complex solution. Open your image in GIMP and choose the 'Free Select Tool' F In the tool options choose 'Feather edges', I chose a 10 pixel radius. follow the top, left and bottom edges and the edge of the curb. Once you have ...


11

Up to a point, yes. As this answers explains very well. On the other hand, there is a point at which one enters the area of "too much of a good thing!". Here's the full article rom which the above image was linked: 7 Deadly Photo Editing Sins That Could Ruin Your Images.


10

The question, as it is asked, does not rule out this approach:


9

Every time I accidentally bump my lens hood into a wall, my leg, a sign, or another person I am reminded of why I have a hood on my lens all of the time, even when there's not an obvious flare situation.


9

Well, as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. The GIF animation below shows +30 Contrast, +30 Highlights/-30 Shadows, -30 Highlights/-30 Shadows: The differences between the three are subtle, however there are indeed differences. Contrast increases the spread of tones across the tonal range, so technically speaking, +30 Contrast is more like +30 ...


9

Veiling glare is light that's not intended to be part of the image, per se, but ends up on the recording medium (film or sensor) anyway. It's caused by reflections and scattering of light by optical elements and the lens barrel. This produces an overlay of general brightness, which raises what should be the darkest parts, reducing overall image contrast. ...


8

It doesn't straight answer your question but I'd say your supervisor is correct on this one. MKBHD did a blind test comparison between smartphones and the result is exactly this theory. The flashiest and most saturated photos always were considered better, even being of lower quality. It's the sad reality we live in.


7

It's definitely not (and your -/+ signs on the B part are reversed). Here's an example of +60 contrast and +60 highlights and -60 shadows: Adding -30 blacks and +30 whites helps, but isn't quite there (notice the grass mainly): Overall, its difficult to replicate the effects of the contrast slider exactly by manipulating individual sliders - but you can ...


7

Yes, your assumption is correct. A levels control is basically the equivalent of a curves control that can only be adjusted at the end points and one point in the middle, while a contrast slider is (usually) the equivalent of moving both ends at the same time (although some may be more sophisticated). The curves tool gives the most flexibility, but also ...


6

There is no equivalent. These scales are completely arbitrary and not measured in any unit! There are no step sizes and no real limits, for example: Some cameras let you go from -2 to +2, -5 to +5, 0 to 9 or even non-numeric scales like high to low. Note that these parameters are subject to interpretation. For example, there are dozens of ways to sharpen ...


6

Push processing (extending the time the film spends in the developer) increases the contrast of the negative or slide. If you're shooting roll film, you pretty much have to push or pull the whole roll. But for sheet film shooters like Ansel Adams, it was a pretty good way to adjust contrast—terms like "N+1 development" in the Zone System refer to this ...


6

You could change contrast of individual channel by curves. I'm not sure if this is what you want though, because it will throw out the image color balance. Instead of changing contrast you can change lightness or saturation. This can be easily done in LR - there is a set of individual HSL color sliders for that. If you still want to change contrast and ...


5

Depends on what you are referring to. Increasing the contrast using an image editor software means making the darks darker and the brights brighter, and decreasing means the other way around. Increasing the contrast will cause loss of details since you won't be able to distinguish one tone from another as well as you could before you made them darker or ...


5

First off, the use of 10lp/mm and 30lp/mm are not really a standard. Depending on the market for the lenses, the brand, and possibly the rough timeframe when a specific approach to producing MTF charts was formulated, the specific resolution of the features of a test chart can vary. Larger format cameras often used 40-50lp/mm test charts, and manufacturers ...


5

You can run multiple filters to bring out the text. Depending on how unimportant the stone itself is, you can take it to some significant extremes. The ultimate key is to reduce noise, as that's largely what makes the text difficult to read (Michael's image is an example of that). Here are a few filters, applied one after the other and possibly to new layers,...


5

What you call originals are the preview jpegs created in-camera and attached to the raw file. These are the images that will have Auto Lighting Optimizer applied. Lightroom displays these preview thumbnails while it is waiting for your computer to generate a high quality preview of the raw file based on the current Lr settings. Once your computer has ...


5

I do not know the details, but do not underestimate the power of makeup. Normally this kind of photos have a lot of pre-production work. Just a tip, "back in the days" of film photography there was a film called "lith" for example Kodak's Kodalith, that produced a totally contrasted image, with almost no middle tones. This is not the case because you can ...


4

Just based on the frontpage you linked I have the following remarks: light conditions on the field All pictures, except for the B&W versions, are taken in bright sunlight. Almost no clouds on all these pictures. This is the available light on the field. Bright sunlight gives harsh shadows and high contrast pictures. This definetely is the first step. ...


4

If you open the image with any editor, you can see in the histogram (below) that it only uses (in a significant proportion) 12 of the 255 available brightness levels. This means that it only has 12 shades to represent the image that it captured. Switching to the logarithmic histogram, you can see that actually there is more, but the most significant part, ...


4

Yes I would agree the left image has more contrast, for two reasons. The main one is that because the right image is underexposed, there is lost detail in the blacks and the highlights don't extend to the edge of the histogram, so no pure whites, while the first image covers the full extent between 0-255. Also there is a larger peak in both the shadows and ...


4

The "issue" here is white balance. It has nothing to do with the lens. It is up to how each camera decides to treat the light. The human eye adapts to light temperature, but a camera has to decide what of all the things in a frame is white/neutral grey/black and set the rest of the colours accordingly. Play with the white balance settings on the camera. If ...


4

Your lighting will be flat, which is expected based upon your lighting setup. If you shoot RAW, your processing time and storage needs will increase dramatically. So be certain to know how this will impact your workflow and your future budget for asset storage. But you will have the highest resolution and the greatest processing capabilities when shooting ...


4

Here's your main problem: Your camera can't tell the difference between a black cat in a coal mine and a white cat in a blizzard. If you point the camera at either and half-press the shutter to meter, it assumes you want whatever you are pointing at to be medium grey. If you want a white item in your photograph to look white, you need to increase the ...


4

Short answer: No, you do not need to buy filters. Long answer: Unless you already have a dichroic head head with built in filters, you may want to go ahead and buy the Ilford filter pack anyway if you want to make use of the contrast control. [Multigrade paper is usable without filters. The filters just give you more control/choices from the same paper ...


3

Dynamic range of an image (as opposed to an image sensor) is simply the ratio between the brightest and darkest pixel values. An image of fixed bit depth thus has a fixed maximum dynamic range. Increasing contrast will increase the dynamic range but only up to the maximum possible given the bit depth. Whether or not increasing contrast will improve an ...


3

In gimp, can you create a layer mask that's a gradient? You could then duplicate the layer, apply separate changes to each side and use the mask to blend the 2 together. Basically, you're looking for a way to do a digital graduated filter - but the filter doesn't have to be a simple neutral tone change.


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