36

Yes and no. I'm a professional event photographer and I run into this fairly frequently. I don't work a lot of weddings but I do many conferences and other less formal events where there are often other amateur/attendee photographers during an event. A skilled professional will be able to maneuver amongst a crowd including a crowd that involves other ...


32

Event photographers are generally in the business of selling prints, not just snapping photos. They want to sell you the best images they can make, not the raw material for making those images. There may also be some concern that their name will be attached to images that they didn't entirely control: they don't want to be associated with your questionable ...


25

I'd rather not just let the photographer pick the X images that he/she thinks are best to edit and deliver because he/she won't have the same opinion as me as to which images are the best. But you let him pick what equipment he uses, the settings of the camera, the lens, where he points the camera, when he takes an image, etc. It's odd pay somebody to do ...


24

I do have various clauses, 'act of god,' 'exclusivity of photographer,' etc. as others have outlined in their answers, and (assuming you're based in the US, YMMV if you're elsewhere) you should have these sorts of clauses too, if nothing else for the following reasons... Unlike many of the photographers I personally know in the city I live and work, I walk ...


23

Because unedited / unretouched images do not represent the photographers' best efforts. A wedding photographer is not somebody hired to use an expensive point-and-shoot. The shots they take require editing because there is more information in the RAW file (digital negative) than can be represented in any JPEG image. It's part of the creative process to push/...


16

I'm not a photog pro (let alone a Wedding photog pro), but I think that in a world where every phone is a camera, and almost every camera around is a phone, it is non-realistic to put such a phrase ("no other photography should take place during event") in the contract.


15

There's some great advice in the other answers. One clause you might want to add is one that specifies that you aren't liable for any restrictions imposed by the venue. If the bride hired you based on some neat lighting effect you are known for, but you show up and the church officiant decides he won't allow any flash photography, you don't want to be on ...


14

Your question is about two separate clauses, and I believe they both should be in a well formed wedding photography contract. Exclusivity clauses will point out that the hired professional is the exclusive photographer for the event. Clients take responsibility for notifying guests that they must not interfere with the paid photographers duties. This does ...


8

Yes, absolutely. My contract specifies: I am employed by the bride and groom, not the mother-in-law or anyone else. I only follow their directions. People who run into a formal shot will delay the shot Snap-happy uncles need to be handled by another relative (I tend to use my assistant for this task, to distract them while I get what I need, or to say '...


8

Sometimes you can piggy-back on a guest taking a photo to get something a little bit different yourself. At the last wedding I shot, I noticed one of the guests taking a portrait shot of the bride and groom on her point and shoot. With my long lens on, and over her shoulder, I focused on the LCD on the back of her camera and, with a wide aperture, took a ...


8

As a rule, pro wedding photographers and editors consider a Blemish to be a temporary flaw or mark on a persons face. These will include skin imperfections such as spots, zits, blackheads, whiteheads, veins in the eyes ETC, anything that is temporary. Any imperfection which is a more permanent part of a person, is generally not considered a blemish. These ...


7

Well, Getty isn't really microstock, they're probably the king of stock photography in general. The only thing I would be reluctant about with Getty is some recent behavior around their treatment of longtime artistic photographers under contract. So, I think Getty is counting on good amateur photographers being excited about possibly getting published, ...


7

I shoot a lot of events and weddings. These are times when family and friends will want to also take photographs. This of course is not a problem. I have been in their shoes a few times and who wouldn't want to take photos at this time. Normally guests taking pictures is not a worry for me. Firstly most people with a point and shoot just want a quick snap ...


7

You should take a little look back to your contract agreement, if there's any rule regarding that matter. But if there's none, these are the concern that you should raise on your employer: Any photograph taken by you using your personal camera on the purpose of fulfilling your profession should be clearly stated on a legally-bounded agreement on whose ...


6

Set and Enforce Expectations My experience of shooting weddings is limited, but I have never had a problem with guests getting in the way. On the contrary, I find that guests are very respectful of me (or whoever is the official photographer). If there is a problem, I find that simply asking respectfully but confidently is enough to get things moving ...


6

You could try the book "Business and Legal Forms for Photographers" The perfect answer to your question might be multiple answers. If you are looking for a model release you will want a different contract then a wedding for example. Digital Photography School has an example contract here. As well as some tips here. Personally if you want to go the cheap ...


5

Just to add to the excellent answers above, I'd say: what's included in the price and what's not. Even if the session fee is waived, are the prints and/or images included? Or are they for extra purchase? If so, at what price how long you will retain the images for purchase/download/whatever. Will you hang onto the images for a year? more or less? Will ...


5

This is a legal question and the only definitive answer will be one provided by a competent attorney who is licensed to practice in your jurisdiction and who is familiar with the subtleties of applicable statutes and common law in force within that jurisdiction. The information below is of a general nature and should not be construed as legal advice for any ...


5

Because some dumbass lawyer sued a wedding photographer who gave him "everything". Gary Fong helped out the original photographer and he's financially OK, but I bet the photographer is going to have second thoughts from now on.


4

Just a quick tip, which I'm sure you don't need, but... Don't get lost in all these legal formalities to the point where you focus on your legal relationship with your clients and forget about the human relationship. If your human relationship is in good shape then you will be less likely to have to rely on all the legal stuff. (You still need a good ...


4

I would recommend visiting ASMP's website: http://asmp.org/tutorials/business-forms-and-contracts.html They have extensive information about business formation, contracts and the rest. They're an awesome group; i highly recommend considering obtaining membership to their association. Membership allows you access to a variety of resources, networking, and ...


4

You own the copyright. What you most likely want to do is retain the copyright, but assign rights to the clients to use those images. Unless you expressly sign over copyright to them, you will retain the copyright. You can't resize an image into a JPG and give them copyright on that file. The copyright gives the copyright holder (you) the right to make ...


4

The American Society of Media Photographers not only has a very useful tutorial on this subject, but they also have, as you requested, sample forms, available here -- and unlike other pro orgs that lock their samples behind a login, these are freely available.


4

Your premise is incorrect. They most certainly do want to release the originals as it is likely far and away the most lucrative package they offer. I would personally fly to your location and shoot your wedding, but it will cost you $15k. The fact is that they won't release the images for the relatively small monetary cost they book the shooting session ...


3

After doing some research I came across this information that I believe would apply to apps used to obtain electronic signatures and any other form of electronic signatures. From Wikipedia: In 1996 the United Nations published the UNCITRAL Model Law on Electronic Commerce. The model law was highly influential in the development of electronic signature ...


3

You should assert your copyright and all other rights (with the 'all rights reserved' clause), and explicitly grant the customer a licence to use the image for the purposes they need and no more, unless it's a royalty-free sale. If the image contains people or property you should check to see whether you need a signed release; if images of people are used ...


3

I second the advice to contact a lawyer to be sure, but from a non-lawyer standpoint, I'm afraid you are on shaky ground. A copyright release says that the rights-holder (still the photographer) has voluntarily suspended some part of those rights. She still owns the copyright, but you are allowed to do something; that something should be spelled out in the ...


3

I am not a lawyer, however it would probably depend on the language of the contract about what would be provided to you. Having a copyright is not the same as having the right to demand the images. You have the right to do with the images what you want, but I'm pretty sure the contract would have to specify what the deliverable is and how/when it would be ...


3

Given that most IT employment contracts consider all "work" done with the work environment to be included, them offering to pay you any extra at all for photos is a nice bonus! And unless you're seriously interested in moving towards photography in a professional capacity, keeping to pay-per-shoot will probably work better for you than a salary increase (...


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