18

Those are LED panels specifically made for photo or video lighting. They are spec'd as "flicker-free" and use DC, so there's no AC flicker, and i assume dimming isn't performed via PWM, but reduced current. That's very different to a simple and cheap household LED lamp, which uses much simpler electronics and works off AC.


13

LEDs don't create flicker from nothingness. They only flicker if their drive current varies. It's not really a matter of new technology. The technology to make constant current drivers with reasonable efficiency has existed far longer than LEDs suitable for illumination purposes have existed. The reason many LED lights flicker is because it is cheaper to ...


13

Maybe, but usually not. House lights have several disadvantages. First and most importantly, the light from a flash is significantly brighter for its short duration. This allows you to use lower, less-noisy ISO settings and narrower apertures. The short burst of the flash pulse itself can also freeze motion better than a shutter, which is nice for ...


7

Also, if you want to shoot decent pictures indoors without a flash, you really want a lens with a wide aperture. This typically means fixed focal length — zoom lenses have more complicated and bulky mechanics that get in the way of just plain pulling in as much light through the lens as possible. Try to get at least f/1.4, but if you can find a good ...


6

LED flicker There is no such thing as "LED" flicker. Every light source can flicker (although not every can flicker fast enough). Flicker is created by turning a light source on and off, it's a property of a power source, not a light source. Take same LED, on DC it won't flicker, on PWM it will. Make the PWM too slow or too fast and it appears to be gone ...


6

There is possibly some confusion here but I need to clarify that Quartz bulbs ARE tungsten filament bulbs as well (both "incandescent" bulbs - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incandescent_light_bulb) "Normal" bulbs (Thank you Mr Edison), which is probably what you are referring as "tungsten", are filled with an inert gas and are not able to burn as brightly ...


6

You need more light on the background than on the subject. If all four of your lights are the same brightness, then you need to do two things: Insure that the lights illuminating the background are as close to the background as you can place them without being visible in the scene or creating uneven brightness on the background. Also insure that none of the ...


5

Try to use a color checker... oh, too late now. Or try to shoot in raw... oh, to late now too. Try to setup a specific white balance... oh, to late now. (Sorry for puting lemon in the wound n_n ) The only thing you can do now is to make artificial coloring inside Photoshop or Gimp. Moving curves or making a new layer and trying diferent blending modes, ...


5

The ambient light sometimes retains the specific mood of the surroundings. For instance, in a restaurant or a club the lights are arranged to create the mood. Firing flash in such scenarios definitely disrupts the mood that otherwise would have been nicely captured in the image. When in low light, a tripod serves the purpose and the image can be captured in ...


5

You can translate cd/m^2 + Area directly into lumen. lumen = cd/m^2 x m^2. That is, 1 lumen of light energy will illuminate a square metre of area with a brightness of one candela. So your 1000 cd/m^2 source over 0.5 m^2 = 1000 x 0.5 = 500 lumen. Modern available LEDs are achieving 200 l/W (just) (Cree XM-L2 top flux bin, lowest Vf), with LEDs with ...


5

You are most likely seeing the 'modelling light' which is a feature on lots of studio strobes. It is normally a separate light built close to and in line with the main light in a single unit.


4

Those types of continuous lighting sets work, but aren't great as beginner gear for portrait photography, simply because they lack much power/light output, and the more you have, the bigger the lighting ratios are that you can use. And lighting ratios are how you get that "studio look" with off-camera lighting. In addition, the light stands may not be air-...


4

To add to the previous post on mixing flash with ambient light - you will usually need to add gel filters to a flashgun to match its color to ambient light. There are standard ones with a greenish tint for fluorescent lights and an orange tint for incandescent lights. Otherwise. And of course your white balance camera setting (if taking jpeg photographs) ...


4

Freezing motion is about controlling the light, more importantly it's about controlling the amount of time the light will strike the sensor. To do that, you have two basic options: Shutter speed Flash duration Shutter speed with ambient light is pretty tricky unless you have a lot of really bright light. The better way to go about this is to control the ...


4

Studio electronic flash units (strobes) must be properly aimed so that the light plays in an enhancing way on the subject. Because the strobes flash and then quench quickly, aiming is challenging. Studio strobes have a built-in “modeling lamp”. This is a low-power continuous lamp that mimics how the light from the strobe will play on the subject. It is the “...


4

A typical home circuit has a 15 amp breaker. At 120 volts, that's 1800 watts. Different outlets may help, but generally outlets in the same room (or even adjacent rooms) are on the same circuit. (And overhead lights and appliances may also be on that same circuit.)


2

Your question is far too broad to answer in this format. Entire books, and even series of books have been written regarding the use of artificial light sources in photography. A good place to start is with portable strobes. For learning how to use them and when to use what modifiers to get a particular look, there is no better source than strobist. Begin ...


2

I didn't know I could do this with my Android phone until I read your question and tried it. On my Android I have an app called 'Torch' that let's me use my phone as a flashlight. It just turns the camera's flash on and it's a good powerful flashlight. It seems that if I turn 'Torch' on before I take a picture, I'm accomplishing what you asked. The scene ...


2

I would say rethink using flash. If the reason it's discouraged is green-eye and that deer-in-the-headlights look, it's simply a matter of learning to use flash correctly, whether that's bouncing an on-camera flash, or taking the flash off-camera. Just my opinion, but I think your concerns about the power/light output from low cost continuous lights is a ...


2

How can I dim these, either in steps (25%, 50%, 75% etc.) or continuously (like a dimmer)? Absent the option to adjust the intensity of the bulbs themselve you have less than a handful of options: Vary the distance between each light and the subject. The inverse square rule applies: Doubling the distance means 1/4 the light per area falls on the subject ...


2

It is possible to correct colors if you have the proper software. Here's the result I obtained with Paint Shop Pro version 9, which is over 10 years old by now. Unfortunately the Manual Color Correction function that I used was deprecated around that time, so I don't know if it's still available in modern versions. I simply left-clicked on a representative ...


2

Assuming you won't accept wire or fishing line... For the lightbulb example (Test 2) I suggest you rest it on a white block instead of the floor, that gives you more separation from the floor and a chance to light the bulb separately from the floor. If the background is a transparent white object (plastic or cotton sheet) give it a portion of it's light ...


2

Try turning the background lights off and perfect the exposure for the subject first. Then start working the background lights in. A lot of studio photogs say lighting should be built one light at a time. Start with the foreground lights and adjust your shutter/aperture until the subject is properly lit. Then turn the background lights on and see what ...


2

There are a couple of nikon flashes that (sort of) do continuous light for short periods - one of their macro flashes could do very rapidly repeating low power flashes for a few seconds for modelling, basically not actually continuous but fast enough not to be annoying. And I think some of their speedlights may be able to do some trick (may be a longer than ...


2

You should be concerned because if you trip a breaker, sometimes things like clocks and TV settop boxes are disrupted. The typical household wall outlet allows for a maximum loading of 15 amps however some circuits may accept a 20 amp load. To calculate for the USA, assume a voltage of 117V. Add up the wattage ratting of each lamp to get the total watts. Say ...


1

As you already figured out, your LEDs run of a DC voltage. If that's supplied by a battery, you will have absolutely no flicker. But if they're powered by a AC-DC converter, you might find that the produced DC voltage is not perfect. Usually, there is some small ripple. That is, small "left-overs" of the original AC voltage. That is, in theory that's there. ...


1

I looked into building a panel using cheap ribbon-mounted LEDs. To control the brightness, there are two general ways. Varying the voltage is easy with a manual knob, but wastes power (bad if (using batteries) and generates more heat in those components that must be dealt with. Blinking the LED at nominal voltage instead is more efficient. But it's ...


1

Not an answer but adding knowledge: To capture LED flicker, try moving the the camera during the short exposure. Flickering LEDs will appear as dotted lines while non-flickering sources will be solid. There's a picture of a scanner LED (using PWM) in this page that shows what I mean: https://www.metabunk.org/dashed-lights-coming-from-the-sky-likely-long-...


1

Most of the time any noticeable flicker can be traced to 50-60Hz coming from AC. This happens when a so-called transformerless power supply is used to power the LEDs, which as you can guess from its name is cheaper than a proper power supply which includes a transformer. However, once a LED lamp is made decent enough to eliminate 50-60Hz flicker, it's very ...


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