11

The maximum frame rates are just that - maximum frame rates. There are several things that will reduce the maximum frame rate. High ISO The higher the ISO you have selected, the slower the frame rate will be. Noise Reduction the stronger the in-camera noise reduction selected, the slower the frame rate will be. AI Servo Mode If you are using AI Servo AF ...


10

My camera has high speed 6.5 fps and low speed 3 fps. I use 3 fps most of the time. This is good for normal slow situations of people. 333ms is enough time to allow facial expression/eye blinking to change between the shots. 6.5fps is just way too fast and I fill up my CF card too fast and sorting the photos in the end will waste too much time. So I consider ...


8

This kind of fast then slow performance (as you correctly guessed) will be because of the image buffer filling up. Using a faster card will help until you reach the limit of the camera's circuitry - you may have reached this limit. Even if your camera's performance is faster than the SD card. It's quite possible that some of the card's 'bandwidth' is taken ...


7

This depends on who does the testing and the camera's capabilities. Most times tests are done with various parameters to rule out anomalies. A shutter-speed notably faster than the claimed shutter-speed should be used. To be safe I use 1/500s most times with good enough lighting to use a low-to-medium ISO setting. Its OK if images come out under-exposed in ...


6

I have the 7D and have never experienced this phenomenon. A couple of things to try:- Set camera settings back to factory defaults. (There is a menu option to do this). Wipe all custom function settings (not included in the above, I don't think). Try to replicate the problem after each step above. If it still exhibits the problem:- Remove the main ...


4

The main advantage is easier continuous shooting over an extended time. Generally, continuous shooting goes in to a buffer and eventually that buffer fills. When shooting high quality RAW images particularly, that buffer can fill within 6 to 12 shots on many cameras. Even my 5D Mark III fills the buffer (with two very high speed cards) in about 17 shots ...


4

I had the same problem with burst speed with my EOS M: JPEG only was slower than RAW only. The reason was in the menu: Lens aberration corretion -> Chromatic aberration -> if "enable" is set then JPEG slow down, when change to "disable" JPEG burst mode last much longer.


3

No, it is not possible. That is because to use the self timer you must select one of the two Self-timer drive modes. To shoot bursts you must select the Continuous drive mode. You may only select one drive mode at a time, so you must choose one or the other. The same is true with a wireless remote, since that also requires using one of the Self-timer drive ...


3

Can i use intervalometer to engage continuous shooting (setting continuous with speed ~5fps on camera instead of bulb) for 20 seconds and delay/timer of few minutes ? (with sony a6000) Yes, you can (assuming you mean an external intervalometer hooked to the camera's wired cable release port). When the cable release completes the "full press" circuit via the ...


3

This is a function of the sequential writing of images to the memory card. The camera can't write one image after the other while also generating previews and displaying them. It is not controlled by a setting. You could probably do it with tethering (connecting the camera to a computer as you shoot) but that is very situation dependent.


3

Shooting JPG only should be faster than RAW only. Although the camera has to process the JPG, the resulting file is much smaller and generally the memory card is the bottleneck, so smaller files transfer faster and get you a higher rate.


3

Please note that its shots per second, and not shots per (longer period) such as shots per minute. All digital cameras transfer the sensor data to a buffer and then transfer it to the CF or SD or whatever memory it has. The sensor and shutter are much faster than the CF/SD card, so after a second or two, the shooting rate is often much slower than the ...


2

Max FPS measures series of shots taken until internal buffers is completely full. After it's full FPS slows down a lot and is basically limited by card write speed. There is another factor that affects FPS - shutter lag, that may be 50-100ms alone. So only 10 shutter lags would take up a second. Shutter speed should be faster (10x or 100x faster) than ...


2

The most common reason for me to use that mode is when I think I may want to get a couple of shots in a row, but I don't want to accidentally squeeze off two or three shots when I really only want one. At 8fps, the shutter is really sensitive, and it's really easy to wind up taking extra shots unintentionally. I used to experience that even at 6.5fps on my ...


2

Canon specifies that you can shoot up to 15 JPEG or 6 RAW images or 3 JPEG+RAW files continuously at 4.3 FPS. This is under ideal conditions with focus locked on the first frame. Most importantly, this is measured with a sufficiently fast memory card. Since you are getting so many fewer shots, it is most likely that your card is too slow. You can get faster ...


2

I don't think there's any way you're going to achieve this without additional gear of some kind--most probably a wireless shutter release (remote). You could use an infrared remote (e.g., RC-6), for which the T3i and 70D both have a built-in sensor (it's that circular dot at the top of the grip). Or, if you're a Strobist, simple flash radio triggers would ...


1

In the pictures from my EOS 70D, software (exiftool) shows a Drive Mode EXIF data which is coherent with the way the picture was taken: Continuous for pictures extracted from a burst (another application reports Continuous, low), Timer for a picture taken with a time (but it doesn't tell how long was the timer) In practice the most comprehensive source ...


1

Do you have distortion correction turned on? If you do, try turning it off, because it affects the buffer capacity negatively and yet it isn't hard to batch apply it in post.


1

Assuming your question is in the context of a multi shot burst taken by holding down the shutter button, technically speaking shutter lag would apply only to the first frame and not each subsequent frame only if you have the camera set to take all of the photos in the burst without re-metering or refocusing between each frame. Even then there is an ...


1

There is a way to fire off 3 exposures in self timer but it is a bit of a "work around'. If you use Auto Exposure Bracketing along with the Self Timer, the camera will fire off 3 exposures in quick succession. Using 1/3 stop bracketing won't vary the exposure by much.


1

100 shots is the limit for Nikon's continuous shutter. You can try the shutter again after 100 shots. Or you can use the Interval Timer, both D5100 and D5200 have it. It will allow up to 999 shots. But if you are using the 30 second shutter setting, be aware the actual shutter time is 32 seconds for Nikon cameras. The interval timer must be set for an ...


1

For what it's worth, I have just conducted a small experiment to try to confirm the effect of (RAW only) x (RAW + JPEG) x (JPEG only), and the effect of SD card speed. I took six samples, each of ten shots. I extracted the 1/100 second timestamps from the EXIF data, and plotted the nine inter-frame intervals, shown in the graph, as follows: UHS-1: RAW+JPEG ...


1

In DPReview's tests (see the "Continuous mode" section), they were able to get a shooting rate of 2.5 JPEGs per second (or 1.4 RAWs per second) even in "buffer full" mode, which is the rate achievable for essentially indefinite shooting. Or put another way, you should be able to shoot a frame every 0.4s for ever - at least until your card fills up anyway. Do ...


1

The maximum frame-rate is quoted for the internal buffer, so you wont get enough frames for much of a time-lapse. However, if you intend to produce a video, you can shoot for much longer by lowering the resolution. 8 and 4 MP are more than is needed for full 1080p HD and therefore will give you lattitude when producing a time-lapse for anything other than an ...


1

Most likely, your drive mode is wrong. If you are in Nikon's version of easy automatic focus, it likely locks down settings like drive mode so that they aren't even an option. Even if you are in the creative auto mode, you still need to select continuous drive to be able to shoot continuously. If you have single shot drive selected, then you will only be ...


1

Most cameras have an internal buffer they write the pictures to first. From there, the images are written out to the (much slower) memory card. So, if you take pictures at maximum speed, your buffer will be full after some time (My Canon EOS 60D can make about 50 JPEGs or 12 RAW images until the buffer is full). After that, I have to wait until at least ...


1

If you only switch between P, A, S and M, the drive mode should stay unchanged. Practically everything can be achieved in these modes (hence you may not need the auto modes), it just may need a bit more time for setting up for some scenes.


1

As you seem to already have figured out in the comments, Full auto forces a number of settings on you. Many cameras allow you to create your own programs, so if the D5100 has that feature, you could create a Full auto program but with continous shooting.


1

Sometimes the 8 fps of the 7D is a little faster than you want to go in burst mode. Even with the Version 2 firmware, you can fill the buffer in about three seconds when saving to RAW files. By reducing the frame rate to 3 fps you can stretch that to around 8 seconds with a fast CF card. I shoot a local high school band. During their halftime show at Friday ...


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