12

This is pretty common for the GoPro underwater housing. One of the larger GoPro dealers actually has custom made inserts that help with the issue. They call them GoPro Anti-Fog Inserts. This is the description: Prevent your camera's housing from fogging, even in cold temperatures/humid environments. Great value and performance: includes 3 sets of anti-...


8

Personally, I have never taken any steps to protect the camera from condensation, and I've had the same camera for about 7-8 years without any signs of damage (although it is a 7D which is a pretty solidly build camera). The only precaution is that I don't change lenses immediately after I get inside. Also, just leaving the camera in the bag will provide ...


7

I will answer based on my background as an electrcal engineer since the sensor and at least part of the autofucus system are electronics. Pure water, as a general rule, is not harmful to most types of electronics. However if the water has any impurities in it, it can cause corrosion which is harmful. It doesn't take much in the way of dust, minerals, ...


6

What can I do to prevent fogging within the GoPro case when I take it out on the water? An important assumption that you must confirm is that the condensation is due to moisture present inside the camera at sealing time and is NOT caused by water ingress during operation. If the camera is sucking in water, then you have a problem that must be repaired. If ...


6

I don't think you need to do anything special - the problem is much worse going in the opposite direction (from -20c back into a warm humid room). When going outside, you have a very small volume of humid air within the camera/lens. The camera/lens will initially be at room temperature and will cool relatively slowly, all the while the small amount of ...


5

I have found the best, most practical way to avoid condensation on cameras is to ensure that they are in the same environment for several hours before a shoot. For example, if I plan to shoot at sunset at the beach, I put my camera equipment in the trunk of my car, or on a porch, around 2 or 3pm (several hours before) the shoot. This way the equipment is ...


5

You have to gradually let equalize the temperature. Don't bring the camera and lenses straight from a cold place to a warm place or viceversa: if you'll shoot in the night let the equipment outside some hours earlier. Then, to avoid mist formation, you can put the equipment inside a plastic bag with some silica gel, and only then bring it back home: this ...


5

Condensation occurs when warm air meets a cold surface and when that air cools down, its ability to carry moisture reduces, so the water will distill and cling to the nearest surface (the same cold one). As long as you don't detach the lens while the inside of your camera is colder, you should be fine. The little amount of air oozing through between lens ...


4

A more affordable alternative is to use the third-party anti fog inserts. I've bought a pack of FogFree for my old HERO2 and still use the same inserts almost 2 years later. They work the same as the GoPro branded ones but are much cheaper. Just "bake" them to dry and you can keep reusing them. The fridge/air-con trick never worked for me.


4

Added: The cure is to ensure that camera surfaces are always at least very slightly higher than ambient air temperature - either by heating or other means. See here for DIY low cost heaters And here re Dew Shields & heaters BUT see at end for an explanation of how the apparently reverse mechanism occurs so that apparently cold air causes condensation ...


4

I'd like to apologize for the rough render with poor detail. This answer does not use any magic, but rather chemistry! Heated UV Protection Filter The lens warmer uses two two fins, each with a hand warmer rubber banded to it to heat the glass element. The heat from the warmers will quickly get the filter element above ambient temperature, at which point ...


3

Keep the lens as clean as possible as dust and dirt become the nucleus that forms condensation. Best is Zeiss cleaning pads now on sale at WalMart optical department and other such stores. These consist of lens cleaning solution (ethyl alcohol) on soft lens tissue. After cleaning, make a weak solution of five drops of baby shampoo in a cup of distilled water....


3

Just try to make this transition (from +20 to -20) as smooth, as possible and as long as time allows. When I have experienced such conditions, I kept camera in its bag in a car for some time and then in the bag outside the car. And same process to bring it back to warm room. Had no problem with condensation. Also you may want to use special camera cases for ...


3

If there is room inside the case a good option would be to place a silica gel pack inside. The silica gel will lower the moisture level inside the case, which will help to prevent condensation. You can also get reusable packs that can be baked to renew. Look for "indicating silica gel" (Example).


2

The official anti-fog inserts work well, but are easy to lose during a quick change. And never at an easy time to replace them. At a fix, I've overcome fogging on a number of adventures in South East Asia by simply tearing off strips of tissue paper. For a recent dirtbike trip up into the mountains of Cambodia, the fogging got particularly bad, and we were ...


2

Technically it can't form inside the sensor (which is just a silicon wafer with etched pathways), but can potentially form inside the sensor package. Of course most people don't make that distinction :)


2

The greatest benefit from including silica gel in your camera bag is to keep the inside of the bag dryer than the outside air when stored at room temperatures that tend to be fairly moist for long periods of time. If you bring your cameras in from a cold environment, particularly sub-freezing temperatures and then bag them in a warm, moist environment ...


2

Condensation happens when the glass surface is significantly cooler than the temperature of the air hitting it. Keeping the lens warm will prevent it misting up. The comment you got asking you if your golf cart has air conditioning is relevant. If you're keeping the camera cool in between shots then this could contribute to the issue. The greater the ...


2

Do you think I might have let condensation occur on the sensor itself because of those few seconds where I detached the lens? There's a good possibility that opening the inside of the camera body allowed warm, moist air into the camera and caused more condensation than would otherwise have occurred. Some would have probably happened anyway. Assuming the ...


2

I also live in Florida and shooting night baseball games in the summer can be a real trial. Big glass can take 30-45 minutes to fully acclimate. But that is the real solution - acclimation: if you plan to go out at night, put your equipment out mid-day in a garage (or other location out of the sun) and let it acclimate. Leave lens/body caps on, and if ...


2

If it does not clear -- place in sealed jar with rice. Better get some desiccant from the hardware store. If you can't find, then heat some charcoal in the oven. Place hot (not burning) in a sealed glass jar. When this cools, add the camera. Sounds crazy but heating charcoal activates it and it will act as a desiccant (drying agent).


2

The only way to know whether your camera has been damaged is to check it after the water has evaporated. It's likely your camera will continue to function normally, though with a slightly shorter life-span that it would have had otherwise. If you expect this to occur frequently, you should consider using weather resistant gear. Condensation is pure water. ...


1

Your lens is most likely foggy from condensed moisture. You can try putting it in a plastic bag with some material that absorbs the moisture. Silica gel packs, like those that are often packed with sensitive equipment, would be ideal for the job, but some dry rice may help, too. Putting the camera in a warm and very dry place may work, too. I dried my phone'...


1

My question is does is effect the sensor as well as the AF mechanism of my lenses? Depends on the amount of condensation and quality of the equipment. I had the electronic part of my lens damaged this way once and the circuits had to be replaced. It was a lens with no weather sealing. I had another lens that stopped working and started again when dry. ...


1

Cleaning a sensor is not easily done, and requires [expensive] professional service. It definitely cannot be done safely with canned air, lens brush or similar tool. As @Jerry Dallmann states, pure water from condensation is, in itself fairly innocuous. However, as it forms droplets on the sensor and lens, any random dirt specks are pushed into more obvious ...


1

What I have found: 1) Answer goes from other field: astronomical observation. Phil was right: it should be some heating device. Here is a sample. 2) Super device from DewBuster and hand-made anti-dew system 3) Hand-made without heater (maybe it will work): Anti-Dewer: long tube, horn made from cardboard or plastic, it can be covered from the inside ...


1

When shooting outside in cold temperatures (or even at dawn when the air temperature is close to the dew point, its the warm air inside the lens that is causing the fog. The solution is simple if you have some time. Put the lens in an air tight plastic bag (a bread loaf bag works for long lenses), seal it up, and take the lens outside for a couple of hours. ...


1

My early cars without A/C taught me that in cold, avoid breathing out anywhere towards glass that should remain transparent. The escaping air has been warmed up your body and reaching a colder surface will trigger the dew point, just like Russell has described in his answer. Blow air out via a corner of mouth if the important surface (like a windshield, or a ...


1

What can I do to prevent fogging within the GoPro case when I take it out on the water? The GoPro line of cameras has evolved quite a bit since this question was asked six years ago. The current crop of GoPros are all waterproof, so there's no need for a waterproof case unless you plan to take your camera diving. Without a case, condensation is only a ...


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