26

You are asking two very different questions, because Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop of course do not have the same system requirements or use the same system resources. Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 Graphics Card: Lightroom does not currently utilize the GPU for performance improvements. It is outlined in the Lightroom documentation here. ...


17

The image processors referred to belong to a class of chips called ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits) - and a GPU is a common example of an ASIC. An ASIC includes additional instructions or routines implemented in hardware which make them orders of magnitude better at certain operations. For example: The Fujitsu FR-V chip designs (which the ...


14

I recently got an SSD drive for my primary boot drive. It was a moderately fast one, with consistent 270mb/s read and write speeds. I've used lightroom with the catalog both on the SSD and on a normal HDD, and I did not see a whole lot of performance improvement for my catalog, which is about 12,000 photos or so. As I started investigating how to improve ...


10

In this very specific case: I found an article on tests of GPU acceleration in Photoshop CS6 from Puget Systems -- a small retailer I'd never heard of, but their methodology seems sound. They actually test with the two video cards you're considering, so this is a very good data source. (The GT610 model they use isn't the mobile version, but reportedly there'...


8

Chase Jarvis has written about how he manages his backups. you can find it here: http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/2010/06/workflow-and-backup-for-photo-video/ Doing backups to DVD's works for smaller libraries, but as you've found, as it grows, it becomes impossible to maintain reliably. There are also issues with how long DVDs last before you risk starting ...


8

I would recommend the higher CPU in this case. GPU acceleration in Photoshop itself can make a sizable difference, but only with a good GPU. The 610 is a bare bones "desktop" card that isn't really any better than the 4000. The only advantage it offers is the dedicated video memory, but that's going to have minimal impact when working with most gpu ...


8

I would recommend looking at a trackball mouse for photo editing. Personally I have a Logitech Trackman Marble Mouse and love it. The reason I love it is because I have very precise control of the mouse by just moving the tip of my finger. I also do not have to worry about desk space to move the mouse around and when I scroll across a screen I can do it very ...


8

For photo editing and other drawing work I would prefer to use a tablet rather than a mouse. With a tablet you use absolute positioning, i.e. the cursor on screen always appears at the location you point to on the tablet; with a mouse, it appears at the location you move to. This makes it far easier to draw freehand. Tablets are also pressure sensitive, so ...


8

This really depends on what you mean by "touch screen" and "image editing" as well as your own workflow and efficiency. I've been a Photoshop user for more than 20 years. I could use a Cintiq or other touch screen option IN ADDITION to a desktop/laptop to see directly on the drawing surface what I'm working on. However, the many 2-in-1 options are very ...


7

I would strongly recommend getting a new card. The danger to the camera, ultimately, is that the card could get stuck in the slot because of the card separating. While I would imagine that Nikon repair could sort that out, it may cost you a lot more than a new card to have it done because such a situation would not be under warranty.


7

A dedicated image processor is uniquely designed, at the hardware level, to be extremely good at doing one specific set of known things. That differs from a general processor, like a CPU, which is designed to be as good as possible at doing an effectively unlimited number of unknown things. Without knowing exactly what kind of processing needs to be done, a ...


7

I have an HP Envy touchsmart, so laptop with touchscreen. I'll be honest I find the use of the touchscreen a hindrance/gimmick rather than useful: It's not overly accurate (plus compare the accuracy of your fingertip over a stylus). You spend your life cleaning it. With an actual laptop, rather than tablet/laptop hybrid, it's not that easy to use as they ...


7

Here's my photography-centric answer. How often do you need to do this? Pretty much just once for the full collection. Maybe the equivalent once every few years. At 10 seconds an image, this is going to be done in under ten days. So, just let it go and worry about something else for ten days. I know this goes against the generally-admirable instinct to do ...


6

Booting into Windows using BootCamp puts you in the Windows OS and that uses the Windows Color System (WCS) to color manage the display. Mac OS uses ColorSync. Both OS's use seperate Display profiles which are calculated and applied in different ways. WCS using CIEcam02 and ColorSync uses the ICC v2 method. So to answer your question...yes and no. Yes ...


5

My answer: disk! Just some real world observation: I am a user of both Lightroom and Photoshop and recently upgraded from a 4 year old high-end Acer desktop to now a massive Alienware desktop with the ultra powerful GTX960 video card. Note that I do not have this high-end desktop for Photoshop, but still, there is no visible performance improvement in ...


5

Start with a little humility... Ultimately, this is about as personal a decision as it gets. What it boils down to is what you are most effective with, what feels best in your own hands, whether the precision services your needs, and what offers "extra" functionality that you think you can and will use. The best way to figure that out is go to a local store ...


5

Many digital cameras now have built-in WiFi but it is usually tied to the application provided which may be upgraded from time to time. What I suggest doing, if you are looking for such a camera is look at these applications and then read the list of compatible cameras. Most such apps are on the Android store which makes them easy to find. For cameras that ...


4

A SSD will boost all read and write operations to and from disk. The data transfer rate on a SSD is, depending on the model, between 100MB/s and 500 MB/s, while hard disks provide about 100MB/s. Latency and access times to your data on the disk are massively faster than on a hard disk. Early SSD models did lose speed the fuller the disk got, current models ...


4

Actually there are many similarities between a Snapdragon and DIGIC chip. ARM is a family of RISC processors and Snapdragon and DIGIC chips both utilize the ARM instruction set. The big difference is the DIGIC has more application specific instructions for dedicated image processing.


4

My personal method of storage for the past 6 years has been the following; A raid 5 storage array. This requires an enclosure or dedicated standalone Server with a minimum of 3 hard drives where a certain percentage of each hard drive contains the parity for the other hard drives. If any one of the hard drives fail, the system will continue working, you ...


4

Eye-Fi is made specifically for what you want. (not an employee, just a multi-year satisfied customer) Many cameras are compatible. Even some not specifically in the Eye-Fi database. I have a Fuji HS-10. It was not in their database of compatible cameras when I bought the card, but the HS-20 was. I gave it a shot, and it works perfectly. But yes, check the ...


4

A quirk that I have found with the Lightroom versions I have used [LR3 through Classic'19 at time of writing] is that they've been designed to 'play nice' with other programs by not willingly sucking up every last resource they can get their hands on. Instead they will use a moderate resource level to avoid bogging the system down entirely and preventing ...


3

While the overall logic that a dedicated-purpose chip is always going to outperform a general-purpose CPU holds, the problem here is that the Snapdragon is not just a general-purpose CPU. It is a multi-core SoC that includes a dedicated GPU core (Adreno) with h.264 hardware encode/decode [mostly for video and games on the phone, but can be used for still ...


3

There are all sorts of professionals, so they do all sorts of things, but in general, losing photo archives is a business risk, and so should be treated as any such thing. Depending on the scale of your business, a commercial off-site backup contract is probably appropriate. Smaller operations — and particularly semi-pros, where photography isn't really the ...


3

I see pieces of what would have been my answer scattered in other really good answers. I thus will not get into detail on which one mouse/trackball/tablet you should pick, but instead try and help with a few criteria and suggestions coming from my own habits. First of all, if you are used to a mouse, you want to keep having one. I'm on a computer 12h/day ...


3

I don't know about an open interface for cameras, but there may be another solution to your problem. Something like TriggerTrap may be a good option for you. Hook a laser that shines though the tube onto a light sensor that's hooked up to the TriggerTrap and set it to go off when the beam is broken. This is how some high speed photography is done.


3

The SSD makes a really huge difference on my system but it is a Windows 7 64-bit machine, so the file-system is different from yours. The thing is I kept the regular HDD for the boot drive and another two (RAID-0) for data (not photos). The SSD is used by Lightroom exclusively :) and it does not have much room left already since I could only afford 240GB ...


3

Currently, buying sale-price bare SATA drives (plus a case to store them in) is cheaper than anything else. DVD media of good provanance is much more expensive and horribly too small! HDD is also by far more robust than optical media. Plus, being one piece to mount rather than thousands, it is practical to scan for errors on the backed up data, as an ...


3

Always remember the 3-2-1 rule of backups: 3 copies (including the original), in 2 formats, with at least 1 copy stored off-site. This means you're really looking at making two backups, or using a backup solution that stores multiple generations in the cloud. You can rent cloud storage from Amazon starting at $.01/GB/mo. They handle backups and redundancy, ...


3

In my experience it doesn't make much difference. The time it takes your computer's CPU to render the image(s) will be much longer than the time it takes to read the file from either type of logical drive. I built my current editing machine about a year ago. It has an 8 core AMD FX-8370 running at 4Ghz, 16GB of DDR3 1600 memory, an AMD Radeon 7200 series ...


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