21

The key to using prime lenses effectively is to use them enough that their field of view becomes instinctive to you, so that you can stand somewhere and know what the resulting image will look like, without even looking at the viewfinder. Then, rather than watching your camera, you watch the world, and when you see a photograph, you take it. With a zoom ...


16

Any flatbed scanner, such as that in a $75 all-in-one printer, will do a better job photographing DVD cases than a D5 or a Hasselblad.


15

The rule of thirds to me is a rule of thumb, a reminder not to mindless frame my subject dead centre of the frame, or else I will probably end up with static or boring images overall. As a beginner, it's a good rule to keep in mind. Not to blindly follow, but to help encourage you to try different framing, perspectives and so forth. As an experienced ...


14

The reason you see conflicting information when researching is because these rules are slippery. None of them have a strong backing in science, and their history in aesthetics is less important than in popular myth. There's no evidence whatsoever that anyone used the golden ratio in art before the 20th century, but people have heard the story so many times ...


12

To avoid the flash obscuring the text on the case, I would take the photo at a angle to the surface on which the DVD rests. Sounds like you're probably using the built-in flash on your camera. A better solution would be to take the photo straight on, and arrange the illumination so that the subject is lit from an angle. That might mean using an off-camera ...


9

For specific effects The bottom line is that you are the boss and if you think it looks good then don't worry what the rest of us think! Given that, here are some suggestions... Placing a subject in the centre can: give an impression of strength and stability. (especially if you shoot looking up at something / someone). emphasise symmetry in the subject ...


8

I hope this answer finds you in time. Please take time and watch Transform by Zack Arias. Please make sure you watch it completely. It starts off as a joke. EVERY photographer experiences creativity block, artist block or whatever you want to call it. Most artists are lost in a sense. And that's OKAY! One way I get out of the funk: I just stop consuming ...


8

Very first basics, a good starting point: The portrait lighting is the thing of course. There are a few lighting options, in fact, any idiotic plan you can dream up probably already has a name. :) But in the general case, the most satisfactory and useful sure-fire variation is with a main light high and wide (maybe 30-45 degrees higher than nose, and 45 ...


8

The composition in this image is all about leading lines and how they guide the viewer's eyes around the frame. The lines outlined in yellow all lead to the cat. The posture and head position of the cat leads us to look along the red line to see what the cat is looking at. That line leads us to the intersection of the green lines which is the intersection ...


7

I think you're asking the question backwards. The subject of a photograph already taken is whatever it contains. It might be a single thing, or there might be multiple subjects, or the subject may be an abstract concept represented by the relationship of those things, or simply that relationship itself. Whether the photograph succeeds in communicating some ...


6

The biggest mistake I've seen lately is that someone will buy a cheap, fast prime (usually a 50mm f/1.8) to go with their fancy new entry-level DSLR, then they never stop that prime down to anything other than WIDE OPEN. Shooting at f/1.8 can be a lot of fun, and can be quite useful, but there are so so so many times when f/1.8 is simply not the best ...


6

From http://www.digital-web.com/articles/principles_of_design/ Visual Center The visual center of any page is just slightly above and to the right of the actual (mathematical) center. This tends to be the natural placement of visual focus, and is also sometimes referred to as museum height. The question is why? Is it to do with Western ...


6

First of all, I agree with everything that mattdm says, and have already up-voted his answer. Great stuff. I can only aspire to his clarity and insight. Aside from all of the technical yadda-yadda, the greatest strength of prime lenses is consistency. When photos are shown together – portfolios, slideshows, travelogues – working with fewer and distinct ...


5

How do I compose photos with prime lenses? Ultimately you compose photos with prime lenses the same way you compose any photo. You apply the same principles and techniques to composition regardless of whether you are using a prime lens or a zoom lens. Unless you are using a specialized technique know as zoom blur, a zoom lens only has a single focal length ...


5

There are plenty of iPhone and Android apps collecting photo tips, including composition. I think they're all pretty lame so I'm not going to link to any of them. I don't think there's anything right now that actively analyzes a scene and gives advice, as if Scott Kelby were standing right next to you reading from the appropriate pages of one of his ...


5

To set some context, I can’t see the photo you’re asking about. The linked question links to a site that I cannot access due to firewall restrictions. I’ve assumed that you’re the photographer. What can be identified as a subject in a landscape photograph comprising of things which are equally important? The photographer determines the subject of the ...


4

From the description the photographer left It was just before sunrise and the atmosphere and the colors were great; I didn't know the area but the tree looked so beautiful with this circular fog-patterns around it. I would say the subject was indeed the tree, and looking at the image there are other "guides" to emphasize the tree. If you draw in ...


4

This is an extremely subjective area - there is much that can be learned but there are so many overlapping opinions and shades of interpretation that skimming through a very wide range of material and then reading in depth those that seem to be of value to you is liable to be more useful than a few explanations here, no matter how good. The internet has a ...


4

It depends on the type of photo you want to take. For example if you want to shoot a subject in motion then the main priority is to set shutter speed so you need to set it first. If you want the subject to have a shallow depth of field (for blurred background) or deep depth of field then you need to set aperture first. In most of the cases shutter speed ...


4

When doing close-up work, you need to keep the camera square with the subject. This is because the range of sharp focus, near-to-far, is super shallow. We are talking about depth-of-field. This is what we call the range of acceptable focus. Your approach is wrong! Instead of angling the work to avoid glare from reflections from the flash, you should change ...


4

An "equiangular spiral" is another name for a logarithmic spiral. A spiral grid can be made by drawing squares enclosing arcs of this spiral. I expect that in photography, the particular equiangular spiral you've heard about is a golden spiral — a logarithmic spiral where the growth factor is equal to the golden ratio. It looks like this, with subdivided ...


4

Let's not over-interpret this image. In my opinion, there are no compositional elements present. It looks like someone passing saw the cat and just fired off a shot without even thinking about composition. Edit: OK - misunderstood the question. Of course there are lots of compositional elements present. They just haven't been used effectively.


3

Compose early. You tend to get better light and less people early in the morning. I also keep a tripod and wireless remote with me. When there are a lot of people I will throw my camera on my full extended tripod, bring all of the legs together and then hold the camera a lot higher in the air by holding the lower part of the legs. Sometimes the extra 6' I ...


3

Aperture gives you control of depth of field, shutter gives you control of impact of movement in scene or camera movement. If you are shooting a still scene on a tripod you can set aperture to what is best, not worrying about the shutter. If subjects are moving or you are hand holding, then you need to think about shutter speed more. ISO setting of course ...


3

That is what I usually do. I try taking different angles, try to be "artsy" when shooting with a prime lens. On recent vacations, I've been multiple times to Europe (mostly the capitals) and stopped shooting monuments and other more tourist-ish sceneries and concentrate on details and street views. In the cities, shooting with a wide lens (19mm in your ...


3

I find this information interesting but I need to share in my words information I gained from Axel Bruchs book on composition. In brief he said that on a blank or mono coloured frame the golden ratio aplies in the macro format of the frame, however as soon as a picture element enters the frame it infleunces the composition as well as peoples preference of ...


3

Those rules (and many more like them) are not actually rules, they are are more of an OK starting point. That is, if you don't have any unique composition that works well with your current scene than placing the subject at about 1/3 of the way (or on the golden ratio line, a diagonal, triangle, etc.) in will create a more interesting image than if it's at ...


3

imho, the composition "rules" are not really "rules" but more rough guidelines, and it's not always necessary to adhere to these guidelines to get a good shot. In this case it's hard to tell if the author was following the "rules", with a more or less conscious effort, but from an "a posteriori" point of view, I'd say that we could see a use of negative ...


2

I think that @Anisha is reflecting a tendency in photographic discussions to try to unearth rules and principles. This is very helpful in helping us (beginners and experts) to better understand what we are doing and how we might "improve". However, I think such discussions often make us sound as though we have fallen into a trap of making these rules our ...


2

Why do you think one of the object in picture is the subject? Come to think about it why do you think a picture has to have a single "subject" to begin with? It's possible to compose wonderful pictures where the entire point of the picture is the relationship between "equally important" items in the picture, or a picture that is only interesting because ...


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