17

The idea that you can view raw image files in any way "without applying any editing" is a myth. Anytime you open a raw image file using an application to view it as an image on a monitor, there are development settings applied to the raw data. If you don't specify particular development settings, LR will use it own default settings. There's no such thing as ...


14

I've got good news and bad news for you. And I'll start with the good: we are in the midst of a golden age of cameras, from every tier from entry-level to the enthusiast models you are looking at to the top of the line medium format options. There are hundreds of options which easily get an "excellent" rating in all the categories you describe. And you don't ...


12

Let's start with what is similar with all three of these lenses: They all have a focal length of 50mm. You should also be able to have a lot of overlapping focusing distances and aperture values. Now, to what's different. When it comes to a zoom lens, they tend * to have a different maximum aperture values that are smaller than with a prime. The advantage ...


12

Portra is a low-contrast, low-saturation film made primarily for wedding and portrait photographers (it's the successor to Vericolor III Professional). It's designed to capture the details in both the white wedding dress and the black tuxedo at the same time, while rendering pleasing, blemish-minimized skin tones. There's nothing special about its grain ...


8

In the Comparison view you have the "Select" image on the left and "Candidate" image on the right. By clicking on either image you will get a white border/line around the image. It's only this image that the "X" key will act upon, not both. If it's the "Select" image then it will be flagged as rejected, if its the "Candidate" image then it will be flagged ...


8

Get your hands on the cameras in question. The choice between mirrorless and dSLR isn't one of image quality or return-on-cost. It's about handling. I tend to make the analogy that a dSLR is like a big red toolbox and a P&S is like a swiss army knife. If I'm going to overextend that analogy, mirrorless is like using a tool belt. Which tool you want ...


7

Here are the advantages of the 50X zoom compact camera: ZOOM Here are the advantages of a DSLR: Larger sensor = Better low light performance Larger sensor = Longer exposure times without unacceptable noise from the sensor heating up Larger sensor = more background blur when desired Interchangeable lenses = better lens quality at the only focal length you'...


7

take a photo using the lowest resolution, then another at the max resolution, A camera will take the underlying RAW image at only one resolution : the native resolution of the sensor. Different resolutions are obtained by scaling the image in a combination of hardware and firmware inside the camera. resize the small one to the same resolution as the ...


7

You're looking at two different magnifications. You took the dSLR picture from farther away, and then cropped to a smaller area. When you resize that to the same size as a similar crop from an image taken from closer (i.e., filling more of the frame with more resolution), you are basically looking at the D5500's image under closer magnification than the ...


6

dpreview.com has RAWs from all the cameras it reviews available for download. Example


6

The truth is that any such decision is about compromise. You cannot have any one camera that is best for all 1 to 6 points you mentioned and do not think you can add weight as 7! Look at your requirements one-by-one and see what is best for each of them. Then choose a camera which achieves a good balance among these: Image quality: Resolution is the ...


6

If the choice is based over which camera allows me to produce better photos, I'd choose the 5D mark III over the 70D hands down and never look back. I regularly use both a Canon 7D and a Canon 5D mark II. When I am shooting with only one body it is almost always the Full Frame 5DII. To my eyes there is a visible difference between images made with each body,...


6

The only real way to decide is to compare the results from each camera system and decide which set of results you find more acceptable. Comparison can be between actual results you produce yourself with both systems, or comparing the results that are reflected in reviews and tests published by others. What I'm hoping for... is 3000mm of 'useful' zoom. ...


6

The most significant differences are the massively superior AF system of the 7D Mark II, the higher handling speed and increased number of direct controls of the 7D Mark II, the RGB+IR light meter that gives better metering under difficult lighting and enables EOS iTR AI Servo AF tracking using the dual processors of the EOS 7D Mark II, flicker reduction in ...


5

I only have odd numbered 5Ds, but the pixel pitch is very similar between the 5DmkII and 5D mkIII so the results ought to hold up. Here's the same scene shot using a tripod under the same lighting, 1/8s exposure ISO 100, f/1.2 (using the Canon 85L). RAW, converted with ACR with the same settings (everything on zero with a linear tonecurve). I shot pairs of ...


5

There are two main things I can think of, the first is the autofocus. On a DSLR, the mirror reflects light on to a Phase Detect Auto Focus sensor while you are looking in the view finder. While PDAF isn't as accurate as contrast based detection (which can be done with a standard CMOS sensor) it is much faster. Since mirrorless lack the mirror, they ...


5

To answer question 1, a large difference between phone and compact cameras is the lens. Phones typically have simple lenses with few elements which are designed to fit flush with the phone's body. Compact cameras more often than not have lenses which extend from the body when the camera is turned on, allowing them to be complex (having multiple elements to ...


5

I have been using a Sony NEX-5R for around an year, and I have played with a friend's Nikon D5300 for a few days. That makes me not the most qualified person to answer your question — that would be someone who has used both an SLR and a mirrorless camera for years. But almost everything I say below is verifiable, so you don't have to take my word for it. ...


5

Here are just some examples. Low light photography You say that your main concern is low light photography. This is actually an area which will show a significant difference. On a continuum between very small sensors and large sensors, cellphone cameras are at the very bottom of the pile. Compact cameras have pretty small sensors, so they too have a ...


5

Most/some third-party lenses report better apertures than they actually have - e.g. with f/6.3, the Sigma 150-600mm f5-6.3 Contemporary DG OS HSM would no longer work with phase-detection-AF (or, to be more exact, the 1300D, as most entry- and mid-range-models, would deactivate PDAF) : [If] the maximum aperture becomes higher than f/5.6, AF shooting will ...


5

Buying someone a big expensive toy is always fun. But this isn't a toy - it's a tool. People use cameras for so many different things that this tool has been customized into hundreds of configurations with different pros and cons at all different price points - so you can find your perfect one. You should not buy your friend this gift as a surprise. ...


4

According to Kodak, Supra was discontinued over 10 years ago : http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/e2519/e2519.pdf So if your store is still carrying Supra, check the expiration dates on the boxes. For Kodak, you now have the choice of Portra 160, 400, or 800 or Ektar 100. For Fuji, it looks likes the only choice you have is ...


4

How outdated is the [1D] Mark III compared to other Canon or Nikon cameras in the low/mid price range? A bit. But in other ways, not at all. The biggest advances since 2007 have been in high ISO performance and resolution on the sensor. Comparing a 10MP 2007 APS-H sensor to a current 20MP ASP-C or full frame sensor is going to be a bit like comparing ...


4

These high zoom ratios come at a cost. Such lenses have lower image quality and let in much less light. Most experienced photographers do not use them. If you decide to buy a compact camera after all, forget these ridiculous zoom ratios and get a camera that has good rating in tests in optical quality... Compact or DSLR? I don't know how much is INR20000 in ...


3

Bryan provides images of test charts on his website the digital picture. You can find them under Tools -> Lens Image Quality You can pick any two lenses and compare them at different apertures and focal lengths (if applicable). Not all lenses are tested on every camera, so you might get some bias from the differences between the two different cameras used, ...


3

The answer is fundamentally no — not because there's never been a site that's tried to do something like this, but because when you're at the nit-picky level, the huge amount of variation from lens to lens makes any such site which does not test hundreds of lenses misleading at best — and at the practical level, the difference between these low-cost lenses ...


3

Yes, there is, but you will need to be comfortable with the command line to do it. It will work best if you are in a unix/posix environment. This is available for Windows as an add-on using cygwin. The program is exif tool Instructions for getting and installing. Here are some examples You will want something like exiftool -CreateDate /path/to/folder/...


3

This is not an answer, just a "comment" to the question about shot-to-shot cycle times when camera is set to single-shot mode. The claim made in the question is that even the slowest DSLRs are faster than the fastest mirrorless cameras in this single-shot mode. Here is some of those cycle times in a list for easy comparing, brought up from the review-site ...


3

Assuming you understand all that StephenG wrote, and perhaps would like to experiment with, say images taken in and out of focus, or with image-stabilization turned on and off, let me recommend reading up on the NIIRS scale of image evaluation. It's by no means perfect but it is at least a reference standard that is used by many communities, not just the ...


3

You are misunderstanding the application of crop factor in regards to your 55-250 lens. Yes, there is a 1.6 crop factor when using a full frame lens on a crop body, but it also applies to using a crop lens on a crop body. So your 55-250 has the same field of view as a 88-400. Focal length markings on a lens do not reflect which body they were design for. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible