14

They lie. It does, it just not supposed to fire enough to matter. The flash is how it communicates with external units. You can get an SG-31R unit to block it and let the IR only through. Your other option is to ditch CLS and go with radio triggers - of which, if you search, we have various questions about.


3

If indoors, just cover the popup flash with anything (even with your hand, if it's free) leaving some clearance, so the light goes to the sides but not to the subject. It will still fire remote flash with no problems. If outdoors, this is not much of an issue and setting it to -- is usually enough. Additionally, if we're here, you can set your SB700/900 to ...


3

DO NOT use your Nikon body as the Commander! I had an SU-800 to remotely trigger my flashes, and I sold it when I bought a D7000 thinking it has Commander mode and renders the SU-800 useless. I regretted it so much! The Nikon body will use the pop-up flash, and it will flash once real quick to trigger your off camera flash. What this means is that the pop-up ...


3

The most significant difference is that the SB-700 can control flashes that are further away (it has more power and a zoom head) and can be swiveled towards a flash that is at your side. By turning the flash head you can also make sure not to spill controller signal on the scene. Of course, when you have several slave flashes at both sides of camera, you can'...


2

I have the Canon 60D and a 430EX II which have the same functionality as the 7D. The key thing to remember is that the popup trigger flash is usually going to be a certain power regardless of your settings and as a result, your camera settings will directly affect it's ability to influence the photo. What I've found is that when I'm using a small aperture, ...


2

I have the Metz ring flash which comes with an IR shield that is fitted over the hotshoe flash for this purpose. The link has an image of it in action and it does work, allowing me to control a flash wirelessly. The reason I bring up this example is that this Metz flash is built to support Canon, Nikon, Pentax, and others out of the gate, the implication ...


2

Well, given your comment, I'd say it's better to use the popup as a commander as that allows you to then use your SB-700 as a portable external flash. I have the Canon EOS 60D and a Canon 430EX II which affords the same two configurations. I've actually just bought a flash pouch for my Lowepro Toploader bag so I can carry my 430EX II on me at all times (my ...


2

I don't have a Metz 52, but in the Manual for the Nikon version, on page 167 it begins with an English description of its use with Nikon Advanced Wireless Lighting mode (AWL is the wireless optical control component of the Nikon CLS). Some Metz flashes with AWL (like AF-54) can only be a remote slave AWL flash, but the AF-52 also describes that it also ...


1

For the SB-R200 units, the SU-800 will be the least expensive Nikon ($250). It is not a flash, but it is a commander. It also has a special switch in the battery compartment for the SB-R200 use. Manual here: http://download.nikonimglib.com/archive2/fjsSS00dnTJB02EH9Pd005z9n144/SB-R200_EU(En)10.pdf There are one or two third party flashes with commander ...


1

If you have some developed overexposed negative film (e.g. leader frames), it can be used as IR-passing light filter.


1

I find that firing at shorter than the sync speed of 1/320 at say 1/400 will work. It removes the effect of the pop-up flash on short range subjects at wide apertures. It also removes the catchlight from the eyes which is from on-camera flash and separate to the off-camera softbox. Of course going to FP mode faster than sync speed means you will lose maybe ...


1

Another option that I use the Hahnel Wireless Remote when I want more distance. It does not support TTL so you have to be full manual on your flash. I use this with my D90 and SB600 combination.


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