19

There are many improvements that could be made here. Firstly, you need to use a much longer exposure, and a lower ISO setting. Get a tripod, even a cheap one, and use mirror lockup. Could do with stopping down a bit further for depth of field. Post processing You might be able to get away with your current shots, with some post processing. Here I've taken ...


15

The white background effect is usually done by lighting the background and the subject separately, you can't do this with such a small box. There are no camera settings that will help you because your problem is that the difference in brightness between the background and subject is too small - and everything that makes the picture darker or brighter ...


9

You have several opportunities to improve your results! The first thing I would do is increase the light enough to get the ISO down to native sensitivity for your camera. Probably ISO 100 or 200. You can get the same depth of field (DoF) by increasing the focal length and the focus distance by the same proportion. This will improve the perspective and your ...


9

IntroBased on your questions, I get the impression that you miss one important point, and that is the difference between: light perception in the real world, light perception in the world as humans perceive it, light percetion as your camera's sensor records it, light perception as image formats and your computer perceives (or processes) it. The real ...


7

Images rarely come out of the camera ready for use, but need more or less post-processing, depending on how well the original exposure was made. Adjusting levels, brightness and contrast of the image is one thing you can do later in an image processing software. Taking a look at your first image, even the 'auto levels' function in Photoshop improves the ...


6

You need more light on the background than on the subject. If all four of your lights are the same brightness, then you need to do two things: Insure that the lights illuminating the background are as close to the background as you can place them without being visible in the scene or creating uneven brightness on the background. Also insure that none of the ...


5

Using only whiteboards will make silver look flat like tin or aluminum. Place some black cards off-frame to the sides or suspended above the jewellery. The silver will look more lustrous with some black reflected and the glass beads will also gain additional contrast in their facets.


4

Some points to modulate in order to achieve your desired result (I assume the bottom and background is one sheet of paper curved up) : 0) you do shoot manual, with the same exposure, right ? 1) put your lights + object further from the "background" part of the white paper -> the background will become darker (curve the paper less to obtain a nice gradient -...


4

Actually, printer paper is not true white. It's produced to fool our eyes in thinking it is, which sounds weird I know but it is. You are probably getting more transmitted light/reflection from the printer paper as it at has a small amount of gloss on it. Photographic background paper is completely matte so it will give you a slight exposure change vs ...


4

Not sure what low cost means to you but I use three items to shoot all product images at Neocamera: a light tent ($60), a glass table ($59) and two desk lamps (2 x $29). Since you shoot directly down, you can replace the light tent with a white sheet. The setup is simple. Light tent goes on the table. One lamp below the table. One lamp above and to the side....


4

Another thing to be aware of here is the post processing our brains do; brightness values are also adjusted by the brain. We don't tend to notice this, but without this effect we would have difficulties recognising object due to changes in the lighting conditions. So, it's actually quite a big effect. Even though an object in a shadow looks darker, it ...


4

The white background you are using comprises over 90% of the image area. Your camera, as is most cameras, is calibrated to assume the wall is middle gray. You can easily make manual exposure setting to thwart the gray background outcome. Try and find a large gray cloth. With the camera on a tripod, compose your picture. Now cover all with the gray cloth. ...


4

The background looks gray because you made it that way. In your original image, the lightest part is (.85, .85, .85), in other words "gray". Here is your original: Simply making the lightest part white yields: That still has a bit dingy feel to it. Here is some non-linear brightening of the intermediate tones: Anyway, the point is that the picture is ...


3

You're making this way too hard. You don't need to light the backdrop perfectly evenly. If the dimmest area of the backdrop is blown out the rest of the backdrop will be equally blown out. There is no shade of white brighter than blown out. Here's the problem with using an umbrella to diffuse the light or moving the light further back: You're lowering the ...


3

It doesn't matter if one side of the backdrop is getting more light than the other. You just need to expose in such a way that the dimmest part of the backdrop is completely blown out. You'll find this easiest to do if the flash lighting the backdrop is at full power (assuming it isn't too bright as to create a lot of spill back onto your subject). If the ...


3

If you are only going to shoot a couple of products then shoot it on any neutral background and send it to an external masking service. They are really cheap, quick and the result is perfect. bright-river.com is just one of dozens of services. If you refuse to pay anyone else for masking, or refuse to do the masking your self, you must face the fact that you ...


3

If you want the background to be pure white and not lose the highlights of your objects then you have to make the background brighter than your objects. To do this requires separating them enough to light each independently. For more, please see this answer to Why can't I get a decent white background for my product photography and the other questions ...


2

I don't know when they were first used, but I can find some easy examples from the 20th century. For example: American Photo, Jan-Feb 1992, page 116, "A User's Guide to Know-How", by Russell Hart: [...] shoot the subject on a sheet of clear plexiglass [...] and run your white seamless a foot or two behind the plexi. Make sure your lighting keeps the ...


2

Select the object (product) so you can adjust background and object separately. It may be possible to do everything with lights, but the simple solution is to select the product using Photoshop (or whatever tool you use). Then the background can go to all white and the product can be adjusted properly. This will eliminate or at least lessen the flaring ...


2

Assuming you won't accept wire or fishing line... For the lightbulb example (Test 2) I suggest you rest it on a white block instead of the floor, that gives you more separation from the floor and a chance to light the bulb separately from the floor. If the background is a transparent white object (plastic or cotton sheet) give it a portion of it's light ...


2

Try turning the background lights off and perfect the exposure for the subject first. Then start working the background lights in. A lot of studio photogs say lighting should be built one light at a time. Start with the foreground lights and adjust your shutter/aperture until the subject is properly lit. Then turn the background lights on and see what ...


1

It's probable that the example bracelet is sitting on a light table, being lit from underneath. This makes things a little simpler since you have no shadows, and the light source won't be bouncing off the top of the bracelet. You can use white, black, or colored cards to create whatever reflection pattern you want without worrying about creating shadows. You ...


1

One stop is a factor 2 of light (-1 stop => half the light, +1 stop => twice the light). So a byte (8 bits) has a dynamic range of 8 stops. It's less than a good camera, which can have up to 13 or 14 stops of dynamic range. So how do we deal with this problem? It is impossible to put 13 bits of a raw file into the 8 bits of a jpeg file without losing some ...


1

I assume the gray card is 18%. Then compared to a maximum reflectance of 100%, the linear stops are each half, or in steps of 100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, 6.25%, etc. So 18% would be around 2.5 stops down. But it will NOT look like that in your histogram, because all RGB data in camera histograms is gamma encoded, which is a different story. In a gamma ...


1

As Count Iblis explained, people likely have a pretty good idea of how that dress should look. The image is ambiguous, but each option cancels the other out - the dress can't be kinda both. Similar to the picture above, where it is really hard to make the dancer switch direction - but it is possible. People probably are even less able to switch "direction" ...


1

While a photo tent is highly advisable if you're looking for a quick fix you can try this: use a white backdrop (a piece of paper would do, vertical) hang the jewelry several inches in from the backdrop with the thinnest fishing line you can find. Don't put knots in the line, but instead suspend it across and hang the earrings by their hooks use two light ...


1

Use a shooting tent. This should create you a lot of bounces and very even diffused light. You usually use two flashes from each side, and that should do it. Tents for tabletop shooting, e.g. check this link. (Google "shooting tent" for photos of example uses and results.)


1

It seems that everyone thinks you're using flash which you said you aren't. Still you got some good advice. The most important is to make sure the lights don't move, and the background doesn't move. You said the camera is in manual mode and if the exposure settings and ISO don't change the background should stay the same. One tiny thing which doesn't seem ...


1

I would go for the green screen as a background on the white object.


1

You can try overexposing the white background and see if that helps. You can achieve this by adding some gap between the product and the background and firing a flash from that gap onto the background. Try to get 3-4 stops of extra exposure on the background so that when you expose properly for the subject, the background will appear completely white.


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