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The flower is supposed to be dark violet, but it's come out light blue. That indicates the image is overexposed. If the flower is dark, the image of the flower should be a similar tone. So for a start you need to lower the exposure and darken the flower. The reason for the color change from violet to blue is that the reds in the image are blown (or ...


7

Despite you saying that this does not happen with 55-250mm objective I claim that this is the problem with camera settings. If you finally upload the photograph made with 500D and 55-250mm I may update the answer. Cameras do not generally make neutral images because it is impossible to clip while selling cameras which do not produce the image which make ...


1

This happens with film also. Violet can be approximated with blue and red mixed up, but in reality, violet can be a single wavelength. The camera's sensor (or three colour film emulsion) measures the quantity of light energy in three bins, the blue 'bin' (475nm) being the one for the shortest wavelengths, and so violet (400 mm - a shorter wavelength than ...


1

It is neither a lens nor a technique problem. There are instances where trying to capture true renditions of naturally occurring hues is not possible. The morning glory bloom is one specific example. Violet is one hue with wavelengths that cannot be artificially reproduced at the present. Your subject pictured above appears to be in that category. The ...


1

This is not a problem with the lens There are several possible reasons why this can happen, some trickier than others. But most likely problem is the color balance. You probably used automatic color balance settings on your camera and since there are only limited colors in the picture, the scene was not evaluated correctly. You should be able to fix that in ...


1

According to Steven L. Buck, Ph.D, Professor of Psychology, Adjunct Professor of Radiology, who has publications in visual perception at least since 1979, "yellow and brown are one-directional hues that are dependent on the brightness context in which they are viewed", as published in the article "Brown", in the journal Cell (VOLUME 25, ISSUE 13, PR536-R537, ...


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