8

Not all color wheels are alike. The traditional/old school RGB color wheel (like Krita's) begins with the three primaries at 120˚ intervals; which places red opposite cyan, such as this wheel. However, more modern color wheels use the opponent process colors which places red/green and blue/yellow opponents at 180˚ intervals... such as the adobe color wheel. ...


5

You're not really trying to produce a reasonable representation of a single wavelength because, as you have noted, an RGB color reproduction system is not capable of doing that. (Unless that wavelength of light happens to coincide with one of the wavelengths used for either red, green or blue by the emissive RGB system and if the display used emits a very ...


4

The ProPhoto colorspace cannot be displayed in its entirety. According to Wikipedia: One of the downsides to this color space is that approximately 13% of the representable colors are imaginary colors that do not exist and are not visible colors. ProPhoto is useful as a working colorspace when the full gamut contained within images needs to be preserved. ...


3

Maximally saturated monochromatic colors in sRGB This is a list of sRGB values that preserve hue but are at the maximum color saturation achievable with sRGB in wavelength steps of 1nm from 390nm to 700nm. These represent colors achievable by mixing D65 (White) with the XYZ colors along a monochromatic range such that the resulting color intersects with the ...


3

It is not surprising at all that your two monitors display differently. At work, I have two monitors from the same batch (!) and they are almost as different as yours. (Incidentally, also Acer, but this applies to most consumer displays). If you had Spyder5, the problem would be solved. With a little workaround, or by using free 3rd-party software, you can ...


3

The short answer is that the "red", "green", and "blue" filters in your camera's Bayer mask are not the same colors as the Red, Green, and Blue colors used by emissive RGB displays. Neither are the "red", "green", and "blue" colors to which the three types of cones in our retinas are most sensitive. ...


3

That is precisely what was used in Kodak Photo CD (the colorspace is called PhotoYCC), moreover it is a predecessor of xvYCC_601. The problem why it was not done is because it is ONLY limited range (as Cb and Cr components are extended for extended gamut, while Y' stays the same), while full range is preferred for photo imagery; the other problem is there is ...


3

Google Photos does not "maintain" or "convert" color spaces. The color space is a property of the image, usually noted in the Exif metadata. Since Google Photos preserves metadata, color-managed browsers should be able to display images as intended as long as the browser is configured properly.


2

Since you have a scientific background (I hope?) I'll use mathematics to describe why what you're saying is impossible. A camera only has 3 color filters--red, green, and blue. Obviously those three words are qualitative and not quantitative at all, but what is important that all color is multiplied by the spectral transmission function of those RGB filters ...


2

My question then is this: how should I best go about using an in-picture color palette to "match" colors between photographs? Any workflows I should look into or avoid? What other factors might I not be aware of that I should take into consideration for "scientific" color analysis? You'll probably never get the precision you need for ...


2

Yes. This is called colour proofing. First, make sure you have colour management enabled, that is, the image has a colur profile assigned (check in Edit −> Assign Profile), and generally the colour seetings are set as required (Edit −> Color Settings and the display profile in your OS). Thus, you ensure that the image is correctly displayed on your ...


2

Yes but you do not even need to. The color gamut indicated by the triangle is the coverage of linear combinations of the three RGB primaries. By moving the primaries you can expand or contract the color gamut. This can be seen if you compare the sRGB and Adobe RGB color spaces, both are RGB with slightly different primaries. Theoretically, you can move the ...


2

It's quite common for images that are entirely in gamut to soft proof and print differently between Relative and Perceptual Colorimetric. Relative Colorimetric Intent is well defined for all in-gamut colors by the ICC. However, Perceptual Intent for printer profiles is not. It's up to the creator of the profiling software. Colors that are in gamut and ...


2

A color-space is a basically all possible colors within a certain bounded bounded volume. There are numerous color-spaces and they are usually defined by a set of variables. sRGB for example is all colors possible by linear combinations of its 3 color-primaries. A color-gamut normally refers to all possible color that a monitor can display. These are very ...


2

The ProPhoto color space is just another way of describing RGB colors. sRGB, AdobeRGB, and ProPhoto can all describe/display the same colors (where they overlap/using different numbers); but the larger color spaces can describe/display colors the smaller spaces cannot without using negative values. But just because a color space can describe a given color ...


1

You can see them anywhere really. To get the most accurate view, they have to be converted to the colorspace of the output device, otherwise you will see a very flat and dull looking image. ProPhoto RGB images do not contain all colors from that color-space but are allowed to contain colors that cannot be represented by other more narrow ones. The point of ...


1

The relative intent moves out of gamut color to be w/in gamut. So if you have some blues which are out of gamut and some blues that are just w/in gamut they may all wind up being the same (colors/areas "pack up"). The perceptual intent will also move the out of gamut colors to be w/in gamut, but it also moves the in gamut colors so that they remain ...


1

I think you need to define what your null hypothesis is, to help guide you on making a robust test (and think what may mess with the results) I would suggest taking a bunch images with a printed scale beside them. As pilot you could just use your own mixed with blood from a finger prick or the juice from the bottom of a meat tray. (Be aware this would be ...


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