22

sRGB is a color-space developed by HP and Microsoft in 1996. CRT monitors were common and therefore sRGB was based on the characteristics of these monitors' capabilities. A good write-up of the history and reasons can be found here. The chromaticity coordinates and available colors were chosen on what the phosphors used in CRTs could produce back then. ...


21

The answer is basically the same as this one on white balance and raw. You're right, it doesn't matter at all in how the image is recorded or stored. As you note, the selected color space applies to the preview image and to the histogram. The camera also may make metering decisions intended to avoid clipping (overexposing to the full saturation point) in ...


17

Basically, life color information is like a box of chocolates crayons... Color information is stored in integers, not analog values — there are a discrete, countable number of colors that can be described at a certain bit depth. Think of the color space like a box of crayons of different colors. A color space describes the types of crayons that are ...


15

Normally you would use sRGB mode. It is the most common denominator. Keep in mind that this mode is not calibrated, so your sRGB colors will be different from other sRGB colors. They should be closer. Once in sRGB mode your monitor may not be able to show colors which are outside of sRGB color-space which is why sRGB is not the default mode. The truly odd ...


13

For whatever reason, the ColorSpace tag is not very useful in EXIF. The only standard values are 1 (sRGB) and 65535 ("uncalibrated"). All other values are reserved. Some cameras use them to mean Adobe RGB or something else, but this is non-standard. Apple is, in fact, using Something Else, and that's found elsewhere in the metadata. With ExifTool, looking ...


12

It's just the values from the sensor, which is a (mostly) linear counter. The different photosites on a Bayer sensor have different colored filters, and the value for each site represents the light which gets through that filter. The name "RAW" is meant to convey precisely that the values are simply that "uncooked" reading. In a sense, then, the RAW file is ...


11

xvYCC is a particular clever way of encoding color data: it abuses the YCC representation by using previously-forbidden combinations of values to represent colors outside the gamut of the RGB space used in the YCC scheme. That is, some YCC tuples decode to colors with negative R G or B values. Previously these were simply illegal; in xvYCC these are ...


11

It is normally the responsibility of the viewing software to convert from the color-space of the file to that of the display. From what I understand, you want to do the conversion yourself because you use programs that simply assume sRGB as a color-space. A lossless conversion is not possible for this. On a properly calibrated system you will also make ...


11

A color model is the mathematical (or computer science) way of describing colors. It is independent from physical devices. RGB-8 or RGB-16 are color models as well as CYMK or HSL. A color space is the method of mapping real colors to the color model's discrete values. sRGB and AdobRGB are color spaces that both use RGB as model. But in one the color ...


11

Bit depth and color space are not the same thing, and neither are they mutually exclusive. They are different things that exist simultaneously. For a particularly simple explanation: Bit depth determines the fineness with which each distinct color is graded. Color space determines the extent within which those colors are distributed. Let's take sRGB and ...


11

sRGB is the STANDARD So stick with sRGB, it is the STANDARD for web content. I fail to see any reasons to not use Adobe RGB when it comes to JPEG files whatever you are posting them on web sites or simply looking at them in your PC... The REASON is as stated: sRGB is the DEFAULT STANDARD for all web content, not AdobeRGB. Don't use AdobeRGB for web ...


9

A color model is a method of describing a color. For example with Red, Green and Blue (RGB) elements or with Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black (CMYK). A color space is the set of colors which can be displayed or reproduced in a medium (whether stored, printed or displayed). For example, sRGB is a particular set of intensities for red, green and blue and ...


9

If everything is working correctly, the difference should be subtle and you shouldn't generally notice a big shift. I have a suspicion: You may be working on a monitor which is not capable of rendering the whole Adobe RGB gamut. In this case, out-of-gamut colors are clipped or approximated (perhaps poorly). When you convert to sRGB, the colors are mapped ...


9

First Question If all colors are combinations of red, green and blue, and my monitor's pixels use all three, why is its color space limited to so small a portion of the actual complete color space? What colors are we not seeing and why? The answer to this question is (relatively) simple. I'm going to reference the sRGB color space (depicted below) since ...


8

Because, as you say, L*a*b* is a superset larger than either sRGB or Adobe RGB, you're right, this is safe — if you have enough bit depth to prevent color mapping errors. In practice, this means that if you are working in 16 bits per channel, there is no loss. If you are working in 8 bits per channel, there may be some, as you are spreading your "crayons" ...


8

The CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram represents all colors that the average human eye can see. But just because those colors can be perceived by the average human eye, does not mean that all technologies can produce all the possible colors that the average eye can possibly see. While no tristimulus model can create the entire gamut of human color perception, ...


8

why is its color space limited to so small a portion of the actual complete color space? Because the "red", "green" and "blue" which your monitor uses are pale, probably not noticeable but still pale. You would probably not be surprised if your monitor used distinguishably pale colours and was said to have small colour space. No matter how pale the "red", "...


8

I think it was the EktaSpace that was invented to hold all colors of films. Since silver halide color papers are still used as media for printing from digital, there are also color profiles of photographic papers floating around the Internet. See https://www.drycreekphoto.com/icc/ for examples. These should give you some idea. As you can imagine, ...


8

It has no impact on the RAW data. It may not even affect the embedded JPEG used as preview but I am not certain about that. The point is that RAW images do not have color info at each pixel and so are not in any color-space. They have color primaries correspond the the wavelengths that the Bayer filter on each pixel but that is fixed and cannot change with ...


8

Yes, it exists and it is called pseudo-gray.


7

Digital cameras and films to do not have "primaries". The spectral sensitives of digital cameras and films dictate their response to various wavelengths of light. These native responses are sometimes encoded relative to a set of encoding primaries such as rec709, adobeRGB, Kodak ProPhoto (aka RIMM/ROMM), or ACES but these encoding primaries have nothing to ...


7

RGB is not a color space, it is a color mode or color model. The same for HSB, HSL CMYK, Lab, Grayscale. But if an image is in HSL color space, is computer will save Hue, Saturation, Intensity Yeap And how computer know what color space an image is? Because you tell it what you need to tell it. On the beginning of each photo file, or any file for that ...


7

ProphotoRGB is the color space which defines the gamut. This RAW file size is controlled by the color depth (such as 14 bit). A 14 bit depth is the same size in AdobeRGB and ProphotoRGB. A jpg is 8 bit regardless of gamut chosen.


7

It simply isn't possible for any print, which only absorbs light, to produce a colorimetrically accurate and useful reproduction of the CIEXY human gamut "horseshoe." The curved boundary represents the maximum color saturation. It is the result of a single wavelength of light between about 400nm to 700m. Along the bottom line of the horseshoe, the position ...


6

Lab is one of those colour spaces that people are either 'in the know' and use when it's appropriate or they just see as a bit of a scary place to be avoided. It's not a one-size fits all space and it takes some getting used to. The main reason to use Lab in a professional setting is that, once you get a handle on it, having Luminosity and Colour kept ...


6

Whatever is the "RGB" color space (sRGB?) that you entered as destination in Mathematica, it has limited range of colors that are described by the R, G and B values, usually similar to what a monitor can produce, printer can print etc and way smaller than Lab. Since there is only limited number of values (256 per color channel in 8-bit), the RGB color spaces ...


6

The chromatic gamut is the property of output device, not a recording device. The colorimetric input device is characterised with it's compliance to Maxwell-Ives criterion - i.e. how metamerically close it is to the CIE standard observer - the equivalent of photopic human vision. This compliance can be roughly characterised with one value, the example of it ...


6

Most editing software cares very much about colorspace. The issue is that users don't usually understand it (because it's very complicated), and even when they do, they often expect contradictory results from their software. For example, Adobe Photoshop allows a user to set the working color space for manipulating their images. The vast majority of PS users ...


5

1) I have never seen any official information, but various people close to the LR development team indicated at numerous occasions that LR is internally using color space that they named Melissa, which has gamut of ProPhoto RGB, but different gamma. 2) No devices support entire ProPhoto RGB, but many, especially modern inkjet printers, exceed sRGB and even ...


5

CMYK CMYK is a subtractive colour model rather than an additive as in the case of sRGB. The subtractive colour models are used in printing since they allow dyes, ink or paint pigments to absorb certain wavelengths from an otherwise white surface. The dyes, ink and paint pigments can be a very limited discrete set that are mixed to get a wide range of ...


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