30

Pardon me while I get a little metaphysical for a bit. "Color" as we understand it isn't a real property of anything in the universe. It's something created by our vision system — a complicated interaction in our eyes and brains. It's useful for things like "don't eat the poison berries", "look at that tiger over in the grass", and, more recently, "stopping ...


19

No. It is not possible to create a physical filter that can completely "De-saturate" incoming light. The only way to achieve this without post-processing is at the film / sensor level.


16

All color is a result of software processing. The only thing a sensor, be it film or semiconductor, can do is change state in response to incoming photons. Yes, a digital camera has color filters, but all they do is restrict the wavelengths which are passed to the sensing pixels. The output of each pixel is simply a bunch of electrons, which are then ...


14

There is a really important diference if you are using film or is a digital photo. I will focus on Digital aspects but will give you an idea of what to expect with film. The method I am using is simply using the primary channel of a colour RGB image. Let me start with primary light colors RGB. As the skin has more red component the skin will look brighter ...


13

From my point of view - or how I use my gels - there are two main usage points: Adjusting a color to get a color effect. For example make your flash-light red/green/... to get a interesting background color spot. Adjusting flash color to the color of ambient light, so that your picture have only one color of light. If you have different light-colors in one ...


12

This technique is called Selective color. Sometimes, you select a point (in this case, somewhere on the CD-R case), and the region around that point that is close enough to the same color retains its color, while the rest of the picture becomes black and white. Other times, as you mention, you can select a color and a tolerance, or a range of colors, and ...


12

You can't add a physical filter, but you can remove a physical filter to convert any digital camera to a strictly monochrome camera. The actual sensor on any DSLR knows nothing about color - each pixel records the total luminosity in all the wavelengths it's sensitive to. The way color is introduced is by adding a Bayer filter, which is basically small ...


11

Yes, their main purpose is to have different colors on different lights. However in the vast majority of cases (if not always) you simply cannot reproduce this setup in post. The human eye is quite good at detecting natural light falloff and it will detect the things which are Photoshopped, especially if we talk about a setup with multiple lights (we ...


11

The Ray-Ban B-15 created for the US Air Force. These are brownish and block 100% of all UV rays and only 15% of the remaining visual rays. The most popular for general use is the Ray-Ban G-15, a green + gray pigment. The Ray-Ban B15 XLT are also green + brown but with lower density. The key fact for a filter to be distortion free is both surfaces are ...


10

If you are using a digital camera, there is little need to use colored filters, as you can apply their effects in post processing when you do the black and white conversion. See Are there reasons to use colour filters with digital cameras? Also How can using a color filter help to improve a black and white photo? If you are shooting film, then Red is ...


8

It depends. Especially when producing images that are viewed in monochrome/B&W. If digital sensors had unlimited dynamic range it wouldn't matter so much, but we all know that they are limited by their noise floor. By using the color filter at the time you shoot, you can reduce a particular color channel that might otherwise be blown out while still ...


8

Photos made "in the natural way" may be more highly regarded by some, but that alone is no reason to go out and buy a set of filters. There some genuine advantages to working this way, however. For example filtering the light before it enters the camera can prevent overexposure (and hence loss of detail) of one ore more colour channels. This can be ...


8

I assume you have a gradient in overall brightness due to unevben lighting. If that's the case, what you could do is to duplicate the layer with the image and apply the best correction to each part of the image on a different layer: curves for contrast, color balance or desaturate for white balancing. Then, using layer masks you can paint each region with ...


7

The easiest way to remember the effect of a filter is this: a filter lightens its own color and darkens the complementary color. A color wheel illustrates the concept. Colors that are 180° opposite are complements of each other. From the color wheel, we can learn that a green filter will lighten some foliage (foliage does not read completely green, but ...


7

If one were multicoated (i.e. is less reflective) and the other is not, then put the filter with better antireflective treatment closest to the lens for the following reason: reflections from the first surface of the front filter won't affect the picture, but if placed in the middle of the stack, some of that could be bounced off the front filter back into ...


7

If you are serious about digital B&W photography, you will probably use editors that allow adjusting the tones via multiple color channels. I find this superior to traditional glass B&W filters, because the flexibility is far greater and the effect can be individually tuned for each print. Multiple variations can be made and compared side by side. ...


6

My best guess is that it may have to do with how the satellite operates. It may capture red green and blue images separately and then combine them. If this is the case, then two things would happen. First, the plane would move between shots for each color. Second, the satellite would move quite a bit as well. While the motion of the satellite could be ...


6

It's called Selective Color Although masking techniques can be used to create such an image, most of the time one can use a simple Hue-Saturation-Luminance tool that is contained in many photo editing applications to accomplish very close to the same thing with a lot less effort. Suppose I want to edit this photo to only show the blue in the sky and leave ...


6

AJ is correct here. What you are seeing is the result of motion blur as both the satellite and the aircraft are in motion relative to the ground (the desired target of the photo). Those pretty pictures you see in Google Earth and elsewhere are the result of red, green, and blue filtered images combined into what is called a "Multispectral" image (MSI), named ...


6

If light colors don't match (or you don't want them to match and they do) then you can't correct for this in post. Lights interact with each other and there is no good way to tell which light is contributing where in a reliable and automatic manner in post. This means that you can not adjust the color characteristics of an individual light after shooting. ...


6

From the Manual 01. Rotate the mode dial to EFFECTS. 02. Rotate the command dial until Selective Color option appears in the monitor. 03. Rotate the live view switch. The view through the lens will be displayed in the monitor. 04. Press OK to display Selective Color options. 05. Select a color. Frame an object in the white square in the center of the ...


6

No. Each colour camera has three types of sensitive material - pixels in digital cameras, pixel layers in Foveon sensors, layers in colour film. Image being monochrome means that all those types produce response with constant chromaticity with any incident light and that is NOT possible because they are engineered to produce different chromaticities.


6

It's sort of theoretically possible, but not it's not generally practical. To do it, you need a relatively narrow band-pass filter that restricts the light that passes through to the point that only one color of the (usually) three detected by the sensor will be affected (at least to a degree that it has visible effects on the picture you take). Such ...


6

There are at least two reasons this happens: There are very few pure (single / narrow frequency band) light sources. That is to say, your red light is not strictly confined to the "red" end of the visible light spectrum. It emits light in the yellow/green region of the spectrum (and probably just a little in the blue, as well). Similarly, your blue light is ...


5

For really good colors you will not get around buyng a color reference card and lighting it with the exact same light as in the aquarium, maybe even submerging the reference. Take the photos in RAW and the software that the color reference belongs to will calculate a profile for the shooting situation. This profile can then be applied to the real photos and ...


5

If you have to use anything then I would suggest a lens hood. The only reason for that is because of the stage lights coming down and might bounce to cause a flare. Stages, with lighting, are designed to give a certain atmosphere for the performance so any additional changes defeat the purpose of that lighting. Now, depending on your location, you may ...


5

It depends. If digital sensors had unlimited dynamic range it wouldn't matter so much, but we all know that they are limited by their noise floor. By using the color filter at the time you shoot, you can reduce a particular color channel that might otherwise be blown out while still preserving the brightness of the other two color channels. For instance, ...


4

Fluorescent filters are for "converting" fluorescent light to closer to daylight (FL-D) or tungsten (FL-W). Generally speaking, with a digital camera there's not much need for a FL-* filter since you can accomplish the same thing (and more) with your camera's white balance setting. Shooting with film you would want an FL-* or some kind of magenta filter, ...


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