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If you know GIMP or Photoshop, or some similar image manipulation tool, and know your way around color spaces the way a fish knows it way in water, a hopefully easy way is to decompose the image in LAB images. Use the curve on the B channel, strengthening the negative values. Compose into a color image. An alternative: decompose to HSV and also to RGB. By ...


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I'm with the others on colour balance first, then saturate. Go with making the whites white. Make the standard colours help the viewer know what they are looking at. Then use a colour correction software that allows you to work on specific colours - such as selective curves or colour sliders - to adjust specific colour ranges. Shooting in RAW will help with ...


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Rather than just wash the whole thing in blue, or set the white balance completely out of whack, if your camera has 'scenes' or Picture Control modes, then set to 'vibrant' or sunny beach or similar, depending on what your camera has. That will emphasise all colours, but without just washing it all in blue like above. You might get something a bit more like ...


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Even the white walls have a tint of blue in that example. If you want that kind of result set your camera's white balance to tungsten or ~ 3000k (lower number).


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Colour profiling is a mystery wrapped in an enigma. A quagmire waiting for you as you climb out of the crocodile-infested river… All those pretty pictures the display offers you are great - but not if the computer doesn't know what the display is set to. If your display came with a set of profiles, one for each standard, then that would be a start. Set the ...


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I had similar problem and found that I had a selection hidden somewhere. Top Menu >> Pick Select >> Pick None hidden selection closed and image colour balancing returned. Newbie mistake on my part .


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Several parts here. The most important part is planning. It is pretty obvious that it will be very hard to adjust two photos in very different lighting situations, one on a sunny day, and another in the sunset. You probably have a misconception about the color profile. That is as simple as assigning it to both photos, but it does not tell anything amount ...


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I was having a similar problem and I found this question here on the Web. I'm not exactly sure if this is the problem you were having, but I found this helpful. I opened a .png image with GIMP 2.10.30 and tried to edit the foreground and background colors, to no avail. Really, for my purposes I only needed the canvas size. So, I started a new project from ...


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your photo is a great sunset view, but in a very evening weather, if you adjust the darkness to a little lighter sunset hours, that is, if you lighten it a little, we could see the water hitting the mountains more clearly, the color noises would be sharper, but i like the result.


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