49

This is called a color cast. As others have said, it is a result of an incorrect white-balance. Your camera is assuming that light is of a different color than it is and is compensating for that, resulting in a color cast. It can happen with any camera. Some Automatic White-Balance systems are better than others. A long time ago, some cameras had dedicated ...


18

It looks like the laboratory messed things up: the film you used is a daylight color negative film. Which means that basically, without (extra*) correction, the daylight images should have been ok, and the indoors way too orange. But as it is a negative film, the lab can apply an extra correction for white balance (probably the reason there is no tungsten-...


14

Your camera, for whatever reason, is setting the color temperature and white balance at different points for the two images. That gives it what we often call a color cast, tint, or hue which simply means the white balance used to interpret the raw data from the sensor was not correct for the light that illuminated the scene and gives it a predominance of ...


9

That wavelength is certainly within the spectrum you can capture with any lens, with or without filters. Digital sensors capture between 350-1000nm If it is glowing, then you'd want that to be your main light source. Any additional light you throw onto it is going to dilute the glow from your subject and make it harder to see. What aperture are you using? ...


9

Just to expand on Matt's answer a bit. Most B&W films used during the first half of the 20th century were not panchromatic. They were much more sensitive to the energy in blue light than the energy in red light. Even if a panchromatic film were used, if a blue filter were placed in front of the camera's lens, it would reduce the amount of red light ...


8

You could try split toning (There are plenty of examples here) This is a good article about the technique, and includes links to other sites which show describe the best approaches in the main photo-editing applications (Photoshop, Lightroom, Aperture, ...)


8

If you have other light present it can easily "wash out" low level luminescence. You should have NO other light to start. Focus with a light on. Either use manual focus or, if your camera allows, set to manual focus, toggle temporarily into AF, focus and then drop back to MF so the camera is focused. Then turn other lighting off so that the luciferase ...


6

Photo films and digital sensors do not record colors exactly as seen by our eye / brain vision system. Initially, photo films were only sensitive to the violet and blue region of the visual spectrum. Translated, films blackened when exposed to violet and blue. They did not blacken when exposed to any other colors. The resulting black & white prints ...


5

This happens when your camera/phone/whatever evaluates the light badly and sets an incorrect white balance. It can be easily fixed in post-process in pretty much any editor. Also it's pretty common and happens even on DSLRs. Sometimes the camera is confused and doesn't do a great job, which is why we have to set the white balance sometimes manually. ...


5

This is definitely edge-fogged film. We can’t say if the film was light-struck due to improper camera loading /unloading or camera light-leak or if the film was mishandled at the processing lab. All are suspect. Film cameras should be loaded and unloaded in subdued light. You would be wise to test your camera to see if it is leaking light. Often the light ...


5

(instructions here for CS4) Start with a fairly contrasty mono (or the whotes don't show through), this works well with non-destructive processes. Go to Layer -> New Fill Layer -> Solid colour Pick your name and colour (say light blue / cyan) and the whole image should get covered up. Right-click the new layer, go to Blending Options Set the blend mode to ...


5

Here's the Photoshop (CS6) formula I used... Black and white layer with "High Contrast Red Filter" selected. Color balance filter. You have to play with this a bit, but: Shadows strong to Cyan (I had -75), moderate to Magenta (-30), Moderate to blue (+25) Midtones moderate to Red and Green (+30) and stronger to blue (+55) Highlights light to Cyan (-15), ...


5

Are any of these in the ballpark? The last one: "imperfect chemical film response". Most black and white processes are not "panchromatic". That is, it does not respond the same way across the whole color spectrum. Ever see darkroom with a red "safe light"? That's what's going on here.


4

There are several things you can do to that picture. It would be best of course to have the raw files. Then you should be able to make reasonable adjustments but still use the full dynamic range and resolution of the output format. I used my own software for this, but these are all ordinary operations any photo post-processing software should be able to ...


4

It is not just the blues, but also the fireworks given a salmon colour in the water. The same you see in sunset pictures. It is because of infinite amounts out surface normals in the water. If the water surface was completely uniform, you would see a perfect mirror image in it. But the waters stirs, so you get infinite surface normals (facings) which ...


4

Some stars are showing up as blue because some (actually, a lot of) stars are blue. You can: adjust white balance (making more stars appear orange instead) reduce color saturation (this could make the image closer to what we really see at night (when our color vision is impaired)) increase the exposure (time or sensitivity), turning more stars overexposed ...


4

The lighting appears to be changing constantly. This is quite common at large concerts. Different types of lights, even those that appear to your eyes to be the same color, don't always have the same spectrum. The camera will very often maximize the differences between these light sources that our eye-brain systems tend to minimize. Sometimes you just have ...


3

To expand on the reference to white balancing in @szulat's answer: If you don't explicitly white balance the image to a reference temperature, arbitrary light sources in the scene may end up being the reference for the chosen white balance, either visually or due to using "auto" white balance. In the posted image, it may have been the lighting on the rocky ...


3

You mentioned in a comment on another answer that outdoor photos of overcast scenes also look okay. If only the bright outdoor scenes have weird color balance, I suspect those frames were overexposed. The density of a negative corresponds roughly linearly to the intensity of light, but only within a certain range. At the extremes, the density response ...


3

It looks like he created a blue layer and gave it opacity, after converting the picture layer to black and white. So, make a new layer over your image, and flood-fill with blue. Then, set opacity %. Make sure this blue layer is higher than your picture layer.


2

It looks like a matter of white balance. In GIMP, you can try correcting this with the Hue slider in Tools -> Color Tools -> Hue-Saturation, or playing with the Color -> Color Balance sliders. Specifically, reduce the amount of Blue by dragging the slider to the Yellow side. EDIT: there is, obviously, a better way - use GIMP's auto white balance feature ...


2

I'm not sure what causes the problem but I suspect it's a WB issue and/or reflection from your light source (both daylight and flash are quite blue) Also, when you photograph something that is basically the same color your camera auto WB will tend to be wrong (actually, I've used a picture that is very similar to your rose picture to intentionally make my ...


2

The problem is the fault of the photofinisher who developed and then printed the film. The film is developed up to a negative image. This negative image consists of dyes that are laid down in proportion to the color quality of the exposing light. Daylight shots are rich in blue light energy whereas indoor lighting is generally deficient in blue light energy. ...


2

Looks like "accent" or background lights are changing. In the future, you can try: Adjusting custom white balance according to the main lights, if possible. Taking lots of pictures to increase odds you'll get something you like. Converting selected images to black and white. Making selective adjustments using layer masks. Seeing other questions about ...


1

There is a distinct blue-green tint in the pickguard in A, so you can adjust the white balance in A & B by making that neutral. Another place to check is the teeth. D isn't OK, it's quite reddish (compare the color of the wristwatch in C and D), but a slightly red skin is less disturbing than a greenish one.


1

Alternate theory: I have seen this type of colour shift in C-41 film that is drastically underexposed. (like 3-4 stops) It really looks like something is up with your shutter, based on the reference sheet. (that is not a contact sheet, as the printer is still applying separate corrections to each frame) Are the blue images also noticibly grainier than the ...


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