Hot answers tagged

10

The guide I've always used is below. It differs by ethnicity, but is a good starting point. You can't use a dropper tool directly on skin because it's obviously not grey. Not if your subject is healthy How to get pleasing skin tone Highlights of the article: % of yellow should at least equal the % of magenta. Light skinned subjects should have between ...


9

Lab employee here. I can't speak for all labs but here's how it works at mine (note that we do both photographic and press printing as well as a few other methods). It all depends on the type of equipment that is going to be printing your product. Traditionally photographic prints are done on a minilab or equivalent piece of equipment which prints in RGB. ...


7

This is a very incomplete answer, but important in regards to terminology and understanding everything: RGB and CMYK are color models. They don't define what your monitor or printer can do, only how color is created. A great question to review: What is the difference or relation between a Color Model and a Color Space? He also told me CMYK is a 100% ...


5

CMYK CMYK is a subtractive colour model rather than an additive as in the case of sRGB. The subtractive colour models are used in printing since they allow dyes, ink or paint pigments to absorb certain wavelengths from an otherwise white surface. The dyes, ink and paint pigments can be a very limited discrete set that are mixed to get a wide range of ...


5

In my opinion the designer is wrong. CMYK is NOT a subset of sRGB. It is a diferent color model. Let me explain. sRGB is a color profile for rgb colors. But actually it is close to a "color space" (yes, this afirmation will be controversial). On top of that you "profile" your monitor and computer conected together. But there are tons of diferent ...


4

If you were greatly satisfied by the results from Costco, then you will likely be happy with the results from PrintNinja. Both parties have to do color conversions to CMYK and similarly rooted ink systems for images received in RGB (any other color space as well). The difference here is that Costco didn't tell you they were going to do it implicitly. ...


4

The covered range of colors (called gamut) is different between color spaces because these ranges are then discretized, "digitized", represented on a fixed amount of bits, and then reproduced on a monitor, in print, etc. One wants to store as much color information as possible in a certain amount of bytes. Now, if you have an equipment which can only emit ...


4

Short answer: If you don't mind which colors the CMYK channel values represent, simply apply any random CMYK profile you can find and call it a day. Long answer: there is no really color space called "CMYK" with the meaning that ANY value combination for channels C, M, Y and K results in any specific color. Sure, a high value for Y and zero for the other ...


4

It depends on the lab. Some processes are designed for CMYK others for RGB. Most labs can also adapt the format, though if you want the finest grain control, you should proof in whatever color space they will use. This is also why they ask for them in the correct format. They don't want to have to deal with unhappy customers as a result of the change in ...


3

CMYK is based off of offset printing capabilities where you are using only specific shades of Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black ink being laid down from separate printing plates to print full color. It isn't mechanically capable of reproducing very saturated colors. But ... most photo inkjets don't expect you to send generic CMYK files to them. They have ...


3

Perhaps it’s as simple as the positions occupied by the colors on the spectrum.


3

I presume RGB is in that order simply because it is the common spectral order — RoyGBiv, in other words. You will sometimes see BRG or otherwise when a particular computer image format happens to store the channel data in that order. CMYK, on the other hand, is that way because that's the order the inks are normally applied in process color. See for ...


2

It is about accountability. Typically print jobs have company branding involved. Printers don't want clients returning large print batches because "The blue is not the same". There is less room for error (no conversion on their end) if you supply them the document in the same format they are printing it in. Slight color variations are also harder to spot in ...


2

The CMYK colour space is based on a subtractive colour model, where combining colours results in a darker shade. This is the way that inks work, by absorbing incoming light - theoretically mixing cyan magenta and yellow together will result in black (K stands for keyline and is a black ink that is used because mixtures of CMY tend to produce slightly off ...


2

RGB and CMYK are very different color models. For instance, RGB is additive: you basically start with black and add colors. You combine all colors to make white. But CMYK is subtractive: you start with white and add colors to generate black. If you think about it, it makes sense: Monitors are black by default, when there is no light, the screen is black. ...


2

RGB is the red, green, and blue pixels as seen on a TV or computer monitor or camera LCD screen. Nothin else works for these devices. CMYK is cyan (blue-green), magenta (red-blue), yellow and the keying color black. These are the colors of the dyes and pigments that are applied to paper by the printer. If the prints are on conventional photo paper, CMY is ...


1

According to blurb: Soft proofing and ICC Profiles in Lightroom, Lightroom does not support CMYK, and you need to hop over to Photoshop or InDesign to softproof CMYK. Apparently, use of CMYK ICC profiles was removed from Lightroom because they did not work reliably.


1

You currently can't do it with native tools if you use Lightroom version 2015.5/6.6 or newer. The option for a CMYK soft proofing was there up until a point, but Adobe removed it due to some reasons. We are still waiting for them to bring it back. See https://feedback.photoshop.com/photoshop_family/topics/lr-2015-6-cmyk-profiles-can-no-longer-be-selected-...


1

The feature you are talking about is soft proofing - a program simulates the output of a media with smaller gamut than the display has. And it is present in Lightroom: Once your color profile of choice is within LR, it’s time to use Soft Proofing. Hit ’S’ while within the Develop Module and you’ll see the background behind your image turn white, and ...


1

As far as I know LR do not support CMYK colourspace. So (again) IMHO this is job for PS (as far as I know GIMP do not have good CMYK support) Please check this thread from adobe forums Lr does not convert to CMYK. In fact it doesn't even display CMYK profiles. You can convert to CMYK in Photoshop.


1

To me (US-based tech support for graphic artists), that does sounds a little odd. The number of copies and size of print says big inkjet printer to me and most of those types of printers prefer RGB input as the printer itself will convert RGB to whatever color system it uses internally (which may be more colors than just C, M, Y and K). Technically and in a ...


1

The basic answer answer is that a CMYK print can reproduce less colors that an RGB monitor. But a more specific answer is that a CMYK conversion should be not used if you do not need it. Manual CMYK conversion is specific for comercial printing, where the plates respond exactly as you define the values on the CMYK file; but almost all inkjet and laser ...


1

I would do one of them manually in Photoshop (Image -> Mode -> RGB Color), then record an Action of the process https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/creating-actions.html. Then play the action back on the remaining images. If you need other steps, such as assigning a new color profile, resizing, etc., just record those as part of the action too.


1

Exact blue is exact blue in all color spaces. If you have a specific color in one color space and convert it to a different color space, it's still exactly the same color (provided that the color is actually possible to represent in the new color space). The color code will be different, but it still represents the same color. If you create a very bright ...


1

Ease of print color mixing. When you are using ink based printing, any application of ink darkens a white page, thus making it difficult to get a true sRGB color space in prints without many inks. If you use a dark blue ink, you can't easily produce light shades of blue. By using lighter shades and a black filler, you can mix the amount of darkness you ...


1

There is no "correct" way to do it. There are many, many different ways and all of them are equally correct. Are you looking to reduce it to spot color or is it full color printing? Does the resolution or color depth of their printing process require dithering? These all matter greatly for proper selection of how to convert the image. If it is truely ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible