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8

The SB-700 is the current replacement for the SB-600. Technically it is slightly less powerful, guide number 28M rather then 30M as in the SB-600. But the tradeoff is that the SB-700 is faster, at a rated 2.5s recycle time as compared to the SB-600's 3.5s. This is a tradeoff, but a welcomed one if you ask me. Some other features or improvements include: ...


5

A flash on the camera's hot shoe is in a known location relative to the film plane. From that, it's easy to calculate where to place the zoom head so the light covers the area the camera actually sees. The extra energy spent lighting the area seen by a 24mm lens when the actual focal length is 85mm would simply be wasted, and that saps the batteries and ...


5

You set the power from the custom menu on your camera (menu item e3 on most models). For each channel you can set exposure compensation to dial the power up/down


4

When you say your current remote triggers don't work, I'll assume you mean the CLS system, which is and infra red system built-in to those flashes. The Nikon CLS system, being intra-red, only works if the flashes are in the line of sight of the camera. If they are around a corner, or behind your group of people the signal will get blocked. You can improve ...


4

In CLS, you organize your flashes into up to three groups (A, B and C; this is not the same thing as control channel). Each group is treated like a single flash. For groups set up to operate in TTL mode, during preflash, each group is metered separately (by camera, or by master flash in non-TTL auto mode), required power level is determined and during ...


3

No. With CLS, this control is not possible (Canon's wireless system for flash can zoom flashes remotely--however, Canon's wireless flash can't do 2nd curtain sync while Nikon's can). However, if you use the Yongnuo YN-622N triggers with a YN-622N-TX transmitter, or Phottix Odins, you will have remote zoom control over your flashes, but it may only be by ...


3

In a wedding, with on-camera flash, bouncing off the ceiling, walking around taking pics of people dancing, etc. Does a TTL flash have advantages, and if so, what? The main advantage is speed. Given that event shooting is mostly about anticipating moments at the event, and the nature of events being that you usually only get one chance at capturing any ...


2

Simply, No. I have a D600, and a set of 3 photix odins (nikon) and 3 sb600s. The commander fits on top the D600, but the cameras built in flash only incompletely opens and will not flash with the odin on top. The Odin commander does allow full CTS with three flash groups, and remote zooming of your flash (so it is an improvement on the Nikon inbuilt CLS with ...


2

Line of sight optical triggers are well known to fail on occasion. Even Joe McNally occasionally has the IR of his CLS system fail. I've seen his gear fail in person. David Hobby, the Strobist, even made a "commercial" with Joe where they make fun of the IR systems failing. The serious pros use Pocket Wizards. It looks like a lot of them use the manual-...


2

Get more groups, or at least different triggers. Just me, but consider getting some additional gear. Picking up a cheap 3rd party CLS-capable flash, such as a Yongnuo YN-586EX (make sure you get the Nikon version), would let you use your SB-800 as your commander, and give you four groups (three off-camera). Or using TTL radio triggers (Phottix Odin, Godox ...


2

one behind the subject over exposing a white background by one stop It sounds like you don't necessarily have to adjust this one as frequently as the other two. If you set this background flash to manual dumb optical slave mode (that is: let it fire in the manually adjusted settings when it sees another flash) you can distribute your other two flashes over ...


2

You can set Exposure Compensation directly on the speedlight. Second button from the left. Note that any EC set on camera is in addition to any EC set on the speedlight. Camera +1, speedlight -1 result is 0 EC.


1

For the SB-R200 units, the SU-800 will be the least expensive Nikon ($250). It is not a flash, but it is a commander. It also has a special switch in the battery compartment for the SB-R200 use. Manual here: http://download.nikonimglib.com/archive2/fjsSS00dnTJB02EH9Pd005z9n144/SB-R200_EU(En)10.pdf There are one or two third party flashes with commander ...


1

Flash (manual or TTL) exposure varies with subject distance (and ISO and aperture too, but also subject distance). Twice the distance is exposure two stops down. So as you walk around the room shooting pictures, or you are chasing kids running around, then many cases are surely DIFFERENT situations, different distances, etc. With manual flash, you have to ...


1

Which flash helps? and in what areas does it help? I'm sure you're familiar with the difference between automatic exposure modes (e.g. Program) and manual mode on your camera. The difference between TTL and manual flash is similar. With TTL, the camera measures the exposure from the flash and the scene and adjusts the flash power to create a reasonable ...


1

As a rule of thumb, stuff attached to hot shoe will obstruct pop-up flash from opening and/or firing. For the setup you described, Aokatec AK-TTL is to my knowledge the only radio trigger designed to work with (and even depend on) the control signals fired by built-in pop-up flash.


1

My speedlight transmitter has a ratio function. Ratio can be set between A and B flashes and the still be used in ttl. There is also a c channel which I guess you could use for hair light.


1

Another option that I use the Hahnel Wireless Remote when I want more distance. It does not support TTL so you have to be full manual on your flash. I use this with my D90 and SB600 combination.


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