26

This is a perfect example of "expose to the right" β€” that is, even though you want the final result to be low key (largely dark), take the initial exposure as bright as you can (without blowing out the brighter part of the sky, reflections, or any more subtle brighter areas). When you expose so that dark areas are really dark β€” either because you are ...


17

Ask yourself the following before you press the shutter: 1 - Is it a good location? I'm quite familiar with that location so I'll mention some specifics: the Longfellow bridge is a beautiful view in person, but there are 2 flaws that make it tough to produce a compelling photo. (1) It's a narrow bridge, roughly a quarter mile long but the sidewalk is 2 ...


15

I think that you can be pleased with the overall result given the equipment that you are using. You are fighting against effects which are unbeatable without cheating and compromise. If you want substantially better you need better equipment or you need to "cheat" or both. There are several apparent affects at work here. As Matt says, there are ...


11

If you have the RAW file from the shot, absolutely. Just pop it open in what ever RAW processor you use. Active D-Lighting basically applies a slight HDR-like effect. The effect should only be applied to the jpeg.


11

I use software such as Google Earth to "stand" at different points to create the same perspective as the image. You can zoom in/out to match the field of view of the image, and shift your position, until you come to within probably a hundred yards or so of the probable position. Once you've got that position down, you're just going to have to put in some ...


9

The photographer notes in the description: 'I separately captured the bridge about 2-3 shots with different exposure and blended them later with the star trails shot in Photoshop.' In other words, the bridge shots weren't 180 second exposures.


9

Distant objects can help. Considering that, once the image is leveled, the peak of Mount Spokane in the far background lines up vertically with the still-existing Kempis Apartments in the close foreground, you've got at least one very accurate line to work with. If the stretch of road that you mention runs at enough of an angle to this line, then ...


8

You're not going to get "color accurate" white balance at night. There's no way to make every object in the scene look the same color it would be if viewed under full spectrum daylight. This is because night scenes typically have a myriad of varying light sources in them. Those various sources are all different temperatures and have different amounts of the ...


7

@DHall gave a good, complete answer. To give you a concrete example (and I have not stood on the same bridge as you did so I don't have an apples-to-apples image), I shot this: The differences between the two image (in my mind) are: In your image, the skyline occupies so little of the image that its impact is very low. In your image, nothing is distinctive ...


6

Short answer: Shoot raw (if the camera can do that) and find the best WB setting with your image software. Reasons: Good night photos have their atmosphere because of their strong colors, not because of an accurate white balance. You have to test some night shots with seemingly boring-looking light and try intentionally "wrong" white balances. A really ...


5

Note that there are differences between the two shots. You assume the blurry edge is due to shake, but it doesn't look like that. Actually, at maximum aperture, your lens likely does not behave at its best. A wide aperture will get you various image defects like blur, chromatic aberration, distortions etc. Likewise, a narrow aperture like f/25 will suffer ...


5

Obviously the two filters have totally different uses so you can't say one is strictly better than the other, but if you only buy one filter I'd say a polarizer is more useful as it cuts through the haze, enhances skies etc. it will also act as a 1 stop ND. Provided your camera goes up to 1/8000s you should be absolutely fine without an ND. The only use for ...


5

Long exposure and probably HDR. Put you camera on a good tripod, set you camera to manual focus and to shoot raw. Set your aperture for the DOF - that would be a small aperture (high F number) because you want everything in focus Set your ISO low to minimize noise Now start with a pretty slow shutter speed (for example 10 seconds) and take a test picture,...


5

One possible explanation is that you're seeing the effects of diffraction softening your image at f/16 but since you also tried at f/6 and still got soft results it must be something else. Mirror lockup won't affect a 25 or even 6 second exposure - the vibration die down quickly thus the percentage of the exposure during which the camera is vibrating is ...


4

My 5 cents: Some nature's effects will be a good (or maybe the best) option on this photo. Clouds: before weather change, for example before storm, or big clouds of interested forms. Fog: in the morning before, or just during sunrise. Time: sunrise or sunset or eclipse of the sun! :) (I don't that place, maybe it's impossible to catch the sun from "...


4

An alternative to "exposing to the right" proposed by @mattdm could be noise reduction through image stacking: align images (all images taken with "as identical as possible" intrinsic and extrinsic parameters (view point, focal length, etc.)) stack aligned images as layers in a single image blend layers using median/average/...


4

They're being blurred out by camera motion as much as they are by being overexposed. The obvious solution is to use a sturdy tripod. Good tripod technique for such long exposures includes a way to release the shutter without touching the camera. For shutter times between about 1/100 second to 1 second mirror lockup, if your camera has a mirror, will also ...


3

Compose early. You tend to get better light and less people early in the morning. I also keep a tripod and wireless remote with me. When there are a lot of people I will throw my camera on my full extended tripod, bring all of the legs together and then hold the camera a lot higher in the air by holding the lower part of the legs. Sometimes the extra 6' I ...


3

As noted in the comments it gets dark pretty quickly in that part of the world. Since you've only got one shot at it and you don't know how long sunset will last, I'd suggest you put the camera on a fixed ISO, Aperture priority and matrix metering and let it run. Initially you will end up with uneven exposures but you also have the best chance of getting ...


3

So since there is no difference between that two extreme presets, does it make any sense to use them, if Auto mode (the first image) already looks fine? That depends. If you are interested in the artistic side of photograph, experimenting with different setting just to see what effect they have on the photograph makes sense. However, if it is just too time ...


3

It seems that you already have both beanbag and gorillapod. If you can't bring both, I would prefer the gorillapod over the beanbag for the following reasons: Height The gorillapod is higher while the beanbag can only be placed on the ground. When there is a higher surface, the gorillapod can still be placed on it, so it is almost always higher than the ...


3

It's post-production. From an interview on the Lost at E Minor website: A lot of our readers are curious as to how you achieved this neon effect. Mind sharing to us your secret? β€œIt’s simple. I try to shoot neutral, whilst featuring lights and darks. This gives me more control for when I play with the contrast and colors, for which I use Adobe ...


3

The print site is most likely just using a simple algorithm to check the file for compatibility to print well. That being said, I'm unsure why they would be making this determination off of file size alone. As has been commented, jpg compression can work wonders in shrinking a file. Given that your image is mostly dark and 1/5(ish) of it is dark sky - your ...


3

There are probably as many solutions to this as there are locations in cities A brief selection... Indoors. Shoot through a window. As noted in comments, this could include a parked car, though there are potential vibration issues. Lash the camera to a lamp-post, tree, pillar, fence, etc - though again beware of transmitted vibration. Elevate yourself - A ...


2

If you shooting wide angle you'll want to avoid polarized filters. You get a varying polarization affect across the frame. Not pretty at all.


2

Take multiple exposures from a tripod. Save the image as a RAW file. Use the self-timer or a wired or wireless remote to avoid any camera movement between shots. Ideally you want the focus, ISO, and aperture to be the same and the shutter speed to be the value that changes from one shot to the next. The best way to do this is to use manual focus and exposure ...


2

In the case of the first photo, it is two different exposures, you can actually see the gradient between the two along the edge of the tree (look at how the exposure of the sky changes). By overlaying two different exposures, a simple HDR effect can be achieved. HDR is really just a fancy term for using a dark photo to get detail in the bright parts and a ...


2

I have not had very good luck with gorillapods, great to hold a flash or two, but not for my cameras. This is likely due to the fact that I tend to shoot with heavier cameras and glass (and I am picky about my tripods). I have had good luck with "bean bags" (I actually use rice), packed relatively tight and heavy on a steady more or less flat surface you can ...


2

The first looks like the city lights are blown out a bit, so you get halos from the lights. You can try reducing the exposure in post, see if it gets sharper. The second looks like a focus issue or camera shake. The corners look like a combination of camera shake and mediocre lens. A few things to try: Turn stabilization off when on a tripod up your ...


2

I don't have any magic formula to remove distracting elements, but what distracts me most in the first picture you show is not that there are people and cars, but the fact that people and cars are crossing the border of the picture. If you can't remove these element from your picture, try to actually incorporate them in your composition. OK, you can't make ...


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