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20

Because in cinema, it's common to change lenses within a shoot while preserving identical exposure. This is rarely important in still photography (and even less so with the flexibility of digital). You might say But t-stops are more accurate, allowing me to be more precise! — and that's basically right, but the main thing is that precision is overrated in ...


17

To add to mattdm's great answer: In addition to the added exposure precision, which is not important to photography, T-Stops are LESS precise in other ways which ARE important to still photography. F-stop is the literal proportion of the aperture to focal length. T-stop adjusts this for exposure, but this raw value is important to depth of field. Depth of ...


16

F-Stops matter most when you care about knowing your composition and depth of field, T-Stops matter most when you care about knowing your exposure. Photographers want to control composition first and adjust exposure as needed. Cinematographers need to control exposure first and then compose as needed. The critical difference with photography is that we can ...


6

In short, everything about color has a psychological meaning or response: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28612080 Oversaturated images tend to grab our attention and there is both a trend for them and backlash as far as art is concerned (Why are vibrant, saturated photos considered 'not as good'?). But, Social Media is not art, it is all ...


5

The second one is pretty simple. Just adjust the color grading. In this case, the white point is not totally bright, but gray, so simply adjust the curves lowering it. There is a tendency of making videos dark and less contrasted, In my opinion, it is only a trend thing. The basic idea behind it is that as displays can render brighter whites, in some ...


5

There are a few factors that contribute to this but Ill break it down for TV cameras since that is what the question seems to be about, (source) The Lens: In many cases the camera is not really that big as much as it may just have a huge lens on it. Next time you are at a sporting event, take a look at how far the cameras are from the actual field but can ...


5

What is the difference between these shots? The lighting The lighting The lighting The lighting The color grading of the lighting The lighting The lighting The lighting The differences in the contents of the backgrounds The lighting The lighting The lighting The difference between the light striking the subject and the light striking the background of the ...


4

One obvious problem with the picture of the girl is that it is a dark subject against a light background. You always have to think about the light. The foreground of the girl can be lightened in post-processing, but the best answer is to shoot from the right direction and not have such high contrast between foreground and background in the first place.


3

To make a general statement, they are just as good as their photography counter-parts. Most recent cinema lenses are based on models used for photography with some modification to improve them when used for videography. Taking Samyang as an example, they often have pairs of lenses based on the same optical design. The main difference is that the body of the ...


3

I don't see a huge amount of commonality in your examples. The most common "vintage look" we get asked about is usually a lifted black point (so the darkest blacks are actually gray) along with color shifts (blue, yellow, green...). (See How can this brightly colored yet gentle pastel-color effect be achieved?) for an example.) But I don't see that here, ...


2

I asked the same question almost 2/3 of a century ago and my professor replied --- Motion pictures are projected on a screen using a projector that illuminates the film with a condenser lamphouse. This lamphouse adds one paper grade or more of contrast. Additionally the sharpness demand and the contrast demand for motion picture is reduced as compared to ...


1

To get warmer skin colors like in Shot 2 you may want to set white balance to Cloudy in the camera during shooting a video. To be more precise use Custom white balance (usually described in the camera manual). Dynamic range is another problem with Shot 1. The bright background is "overburning" the image taking color depth from the face to catch details in ...


1

Vintage look comes from postprocessing of colors (lower color temperature, lifted black point, less saturation, less contrast, less blue component, a bit of purple tinting) and certain effects simulating lens deficiencies, such as blurs, vignetting, reflections because of improper lens coatings, etc.) Crispness comes from local contrast enhancements. (None ...


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