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34

I would guess that most photographers do not have any formal training in photography these days (whether by school or apprenticeship)...camera and lens technology is cheaper than ever and post-processing skill is almost irrelevant as the tools themselves get smarter and pre-packed action-sets or filters are used. What this means is, there are an absolute ...


14

A portfolio is always better than a degree, but it can depend on what areas of photography you want to work in. If you're working for private clients and individuals, then nobody is going to ask you for a degree, they just want to see your work. If you're working as a photographer in a higher-end studio or for a major fashion magazine, then it might help. ...


5

Become an "Ambulance chaser". Both in real and in figurative sense. Follow ambulances, firetrucks, police cars. Take photos when suitable. Offer the photos to local newspapers. That's a long road, takes time and most cases are such that you can't get a photograph or if you can, nobody wants to buy and publish it. I would not actually sit and wait for them, ...


4

Learn (if you don't know already) C/C++ - it is THE language for embedded systems (no, I don't like it, but this is the way it is) Learn how a (dSLR) camera works as a machine. Of course, you need to buy one - highly recommended a Canon (recommended 5D Mk2 or, better, 5D Mk3) because of the latest point in my list. Learn to be a photographer - learn his/her ...


3

David Hurn is the grandfather of photography education and a member of the Magnum cooperative. He devised and ran the now legendary School of Documentary Photography in Newport. Despite his pedagogical background, I saw David speak about a month ago at the Photographers' Gallery in London. His advice now is to apprentice yourself to the best photographer ...


3

In a word, no: you do not need experience of using film to be a professional photographer, part-time or otherwise. The only considerations a client will care about are: that you produce images they like and that fulfils their brief, and that you do so on time and within budget. As a freelancer, how you achieve those things is generally up to you. These ...


3

Will potential clients/job pass over someone with no experience with film (both shooting and developing)? Some might. Some might not. The exact answer is as varied as the number of potential clients/employers. In the case of contract work for clients, it might be as varied as each specific potential job. You're more likely to be expected to have at least a ...


3

Yes, you surely can have a career without a photography degree. just build up a good portfolio and read books...basically, just keep learning.


2

The easiest way is to start by blogging or working with a smaller Internet based organization (which tend to have smaller staff). It often isn't paid or significantly paid work getting started, but that's the point of it is to build experience rather than get paid at first. I spent a number of years working as the IT Director and Video Producer for WiiCafé ...


2

"Residency" can be an awful broad term. Some are more like internships for students, others are full fledged positions for veterans in their fields. Based on my limited experience talking to friends and colleagues who have done residencies that involve photography here in the United States, I'd say the answers to each of your multiple questions ...


1

Reductio ad absurdum: Consider the following scenario. Suppose you need to have a degree but you violate that law and go on to become an illegal photographer who is very successful, who has won many prizes. Then you are found out, you never actually got a degree allowing you to practice photography. All of your photography works suddenly become worthless, ...


1

I've done my fair share of photography and had no formal training - I was able to comfortably shoot catalogue items for customers, then moved into shooting real estate imagines for extra money on weekends and after hours. I would also say it depends on your equipment, It's like any skilled profession, if you are passionate about it it will show in the end ...


1

Take a Computational Photography or "Computer Vision" course, or read a book, and see in which of its subfields you can contribute to the greater good, earn money and have fun. There are also cameras forming parts of other systems, e.g. on microscopes, on assembly lines , on satellites; and software for these devices needs to be written, but this is not ...


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