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52

How to zoom with Canon 77D with Canon 50mm 1.4 lens To zoom in, step forward. To zoom out, step back. It's often called zooming with your feet.


51

It looks like you've got a problem with the shutter. Possibly one of the "blades" in the second curtain is missing and allowing light to strike the sensor between the time after the second curtain has completed its travel and the time the sensor is read out. Here's what a 70D shutter curtain looks like. Does the shape of the 2nd of four individual blade ...


50

From what I see this is element from the shutter. And my humble advise is to send your camera to repair shop, give it in to the hands of professional, do not try to repair it.


50

I think your artistic decisions in this image are fine, and it is a worthy effort, but I also think that is exactly why Shutterstock rejected your image: they don't buy art. I would suggest that Shutterstock is interested in images that can be utilized commercially, where the subject is critical to conveying whatever the client wishes. Should the client wish ...


46

All pixels are not equal Larger pixel wells, such as those found on a 20MP full frame sensor, are able to capture more photons than smaller pixels like those on a high resolution phone sensor. The pixel pitch for the EOS 1D X Mark II is 6.6µm. The pixel pitch for the Samsung Galaxy S5 is 1.12µm. That means that in terms of surface area the pixels in the 1D X ...


41

You can’t. The 50mm f/1.4 is a prime lens, which means it has a fixed focal length, or fixed field of view. This is what some people call a “sneaker zoom” lens, where you as the photographer have to physically move to change what you see in the viewfinder. See mattdm’s great response in this question.


38

It's likely the sum of a few factors. Firstly, although you state "the same f-stop", it's important to realise that the manufacturer stated focal length and aperture values are often rounded, and not always in the way you'd expect. It might be the case that the Samyang is f/1.45 in reality, not f/1.4. The next factor is vignetting, wide aperture lenses are ...


35

There is no reason whatsoever that you need to shoot a static object from a tripod with 1/100s or 1/200s shutter speed. The shutter speed has nothing whatsoever to do with "soft focus": it just has to do with susceptibility to movements of camera and subject. Neither camera nor subject move; in fact, for shooting from a tripod you should disable image ...


34

The DxO Mark scores are misleading, but that doesn't mean the gap in performance isn't real! Several Nikon bodies (D800, D600 many of the D3xxx and D5xxx series) are using Sony Exmor sensors which feature a cutting edge ADC/read noise reduction system to achieve massive gains in dynamic range compared to Canon sensors, which are designed and fabricated in ...


34

To investigate sensor dust, perform the following test: Close your aperture as much as possible (high F-number). This makes the sensor dust more visible. Increase the focal length as much as possible (zoom in). Focus on infinity (not sure if the focus part is actually necessary) on a bright, uniform background. I've found that the blue sky works well for ...


34

For all practical purposes, any of the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS/IS II/IS STM lenses are totally redundant if you already have an EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS in good working condition. What you should not do is buy another lens because it is very marginally better on paper than your current lens. That's how you waste money on GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome). ...


33

Like many things when it comes to designing hardware for photography, there are always tradeoffs to be considered and made. STM lenses sacrifice a little speed in order to be quieter and smoother (no jerky starts and stops). This is important when using Autofocus while recording video. Lenses with USM focus designs are built for speed first and quiet ...


29

No Canon EOS body needs AF motors because every single Canon EF lens released since the EOS system was introduced since 1987 has a focus motor in the lens. Thus no Canon EOS camera has ever had a need for a focus motor in the body. There are a few manual focus lenses in the EOS system, but they are clearly designated as such by not being named as an EF lens:...


29

No, your camera sensor is not bigger than your smartphone sensor, they are both about 1/2,5". The difference is that your Canon camera uses ancient sensor technology (more noise), smaller aperture (less light) and no sophisticated image processing, so no wonder it will produce inferior images in nearly all conditions, except when zooming in, thanks to its ...


29

Doing an edge detection, this is where your image is sharp: If I draw a rectangle around it, it is 475x514 pixels, or 244kpx² out of 4600kpx². That's just 5%! Even for a picture with blurred background, my expectation would be more like 30%. An acceptable image (just considering sharpness) could be For the above picture, I still see a lot of room for ...


28

Compromises are made in everything. Look a little harder and you can find "top" DSLRs with many, many more pixels. Hasselblad H6D-100c has 100 MP, for example. But looking at only megapixels gives you a very incomplete picture of what the camera can do. Directly tied to resolution is throughput: shooting a 20 megapixel image at 16 frames per second = 320 MP ...


28

At least as of a few years ago, there was no "algorithm". The only automated reason for a rejection, when I was there, was submitting an identical image to one already on the system. Everything else was done by trained humans. I don't believe it's changed terribly much in the intervening years. This isn't a saleable image by Shutterstock standards, ...


27

It doesn't really matter whether shutter activations are in burst mode or not. What matters is that they happen. 500 shots per day for 150 days is 75,000 shutter activations! Canon no longer provides shutter ratings for the Rebel series but back when they did the oldest Rebels and later lower priced models had ratings of 50,000 activations while the later ...


26

There's probably something on the sensor - maybe a dust particle. You can check if the Canon camera has a sensor cleaning option and use it or take the camera to a local repair shop and have the sensor cleaned there. Or you can clean the sensor yourself, but I wouldn't recommend it, as you are a beginner.


25

Like many questions about what setting works best: It depends. The native ISO for almost all Canon DLSRs over the last few years has been ISO 100. 'Full stop' intervals, such as ISO 200, ISO 400, ISO 800, etc. increase the analog amplification of the signal readout of the sensor. The 1/3 stops in between those full stops use software adjustments during in-...


25

Full disclosure: A Canon EOS 50D was what I consider my first "real" DSLR after moving up from an EOS Rebel XTi/400D that was my first DSLR of any kind. The Rebel felt like a high priced toy. The 50D felt like the film SLRs I learned on in the 1980s. I have no attachment whatsoever to the Rebel XTi. I gave it away years ago. I'll probably never let go of ...


24

The 24-70 is an incredibly good lens - it's as sharp wide-open as just about any prime at every focal length across just about its entire field. But it's only 24-70. As you're talking about a full-frame Canon, that's as wide (16mm * crop factor of 1.5 = 24mm), but you'll be losing a lot of length at the telephoto end - your 90mm on APS-C is equivalent to ...


24

It turned out that I did insert another memory card, whose last number was IMG_9544, that's why when I insert new memory card, it starts from there, as @PhilipKendall suggested. Thanks for all inputs, I know more about settings of camera.


23

The camera usually keeps the aperture open as wide as possible while framing the shot. It is only closed to the setting you dialed in when the picture is being taken. This allows for a brighter viewfinder and more of the auto focus points to be used. As described in the manual of your camera on page 114, there's a dedicated button to stop down the aperture ...


22

What is this red dot next to the viewfinder and live view button on the Canon EOS Rebel T6 (1300D)? A red dot is a common symbol for the record function, and as on other EOS bodies that button serves the dual purpose of starting Live View mode and starting and stopping movie recording. The icon on the button itself is the Live View icon, and I think the red ...


22

Taking apart lens to fix yourself isn't usually a good idea. Due to the precision in optics, lens assembly is only ever really done by professionals who know what they're doing, have access to equipment and usually work in a clean room (plus more importantly can put it back together again.) Sadly being the 18-55 and what it is, it wouldn't be cost effective ...


22

The primary reasons for the differences in image quality between the two cameras are the settings and technique used to capture the image, not sensor technology. To get sharper images, increase ISO, increase shutter speed, and use shorter focal length. Choose appropriate aperture and exposure compensation. Use shutter half-press, and hold steady while ...


22

The sensors and lenses of even the most humble DSLR or mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras (ILCs) currently on the market are far better than those found in the best phone cameras. Sensors and glass can only take one so far, though. The current crop of top smartphones have leveraged the power of computational photography¹ in a way that most ILCs don't. ...


22

Looking at the EXIF data in the posted photograph, i.e. extra information also stored in the image file, such as camera and lens model, and camera settings, I can see this setting: Exposure Bias Value: -5 I assume that "Exposure Bias" is what is also called "Exposure Compensation". I.e. you tell the camera, that this should be darker or brighter than ...


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