13

Any EF fit lenses you own (usually marked with a red dot near the EOS mount) will work fine with the 5D mkII Any EF-S fit lenses you own (usually marked with a white square near the EOS mount) won't work or fit the 5d mkII, as these are designed to fit crop sensor cameras like the T2i and not full frame sensors like the 5D mkII As an addition, some non-...


13

The difference is in the flange focal distance, i.e. the distance between the mounting flange for the lens and the film/sensor. Canon's EF-M has an 18mm flange focal distance, compared to 44mm for the EF and EF-S systems. That is, the lens is effectively 26mm closer to the sensor on the EF-M cameras, thanks to not having a reflex mirror, so not needing to ...


9

Not unless you drop the lens while removing it because you don't have enough hands to hold everything. Seriously, no you can't damage a Canon EOS lens using this procedure. Canon EOS lenses are designed in such a way that the diaphragm is moved in both directions by a micro servo attached to the diaphragm assembly. Unlike many lens designs, there are no ...


8

First of all, this leaves only .5 mm for the adapter, which isn't a lot. With a mount that's a lot smaller in diameter most of the adapter could sit inside the EF mount ring, and you could probably do it. From what I recall of the diameters, they're similar enough that this would be extremely difficult, if possible at all (and I'm leaning toward "probably ...


7

The main problem with using EF-S mount lenses on a FF camera is as you said the risk of damaging the mirror. EF-S lenses can protrude further back into the camera body than EF lenses, which means the mirror might hit the rear of the lense. This is what can cause damage to the mirror itself or the mechanism for flipping the mirror. For some EF-S mount lenses ...


5

All EF lenses manufactured since 1987 will work on all EF mount EOS SLR cameras made by Canon since 1987 when the EOS system was introduced. This includes all film EOS SLR cameras and all digital EOS SLR cameras including all DSLR models with full frame, APS-H, and APS-C size sensors. EF-S lenses will only work on EOS DSLR cameras with APS-C sized sensors. ...


4

There is a FotodioX adapter which has aperture control and maintains infinity focus through an optical element. FotodioX Pro Lens Mount Adapter for Sony A Lens to Canon EF Mount


4

As noted in the review for each lens at the-digital-picture.com: ...focal length is the biggest and really, only, significant difference...[between the lenses] The obvious difference is the focal length. They are similar, but 24mm will be noticeably wider. The 24mm is also 20g heavier and slightly longer(.2"). Overall just choose the focal length you ...


4

Is it possible? Yes. You can probably do this by physically modifying the lens. Is it safe? No. The rear element of some (most?) Canon EF-S lenses extends into the body when at the wide (18mm) end. This causes the mirror to hit the back of the lens, potentially damaging both the lens and the camera. People have had success modifying EF-S lenses to fit on ...


4

It will work. Any EF lens will mount on any EOS camera - as long as it's not EF-S or EF-M (which the 50mm f/1.8 isn't). In addition, MP-E and TS-E lenses will also mount and work on any EOS camera.


3

EF-S lenses manufactured by Canon have an extra tab that prevents them from being mounted on Full Frame and APS-H Canon bodies. Many "digital" lenses made by third party manufacturers do not. You should be careful when using them on full frame bodies because the full frame mirror passes much closer to the lens mount flange than the mirror on crop bodies does....


3

What would it cost to repair it? Should I just get a new lens? I don't know how much it'll cost to repair, but it's hard to imagine that it'll be less than the cost to replace it. Amazon has a factory-refurbished EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III for under $100.


3

Yes, you should get a new lens. The 75-300 is almost unquestionably the worst lens made by Canon, so spending any money on it is a bad investment.


3

Other answers have already said what I'd have said, apart from the fact that the only reason I'd use one of these adapters is if I had Canon lenses and you want IS. Having IS is arguably the most useful advantage these adapters offer, as shooting with adapted lenses with dumb adapters is quite simple. I'm looking to use my husbands EF 24-70 f2.8 II and ...


3

The back element of EF-S lenses can be closer to the sensor (but it doesn't have to be) and it can actually hit the mirror and damage the lens and/or body. Canon EF-S lenses are mechanically incompatible with EF mount by design. That said, many of "crop" 3rd party lenses have EF mount instead. For 3rd party lenses some take advantage of the extra space at ...


3

The third generation Canon extenders perform very will with the 300 f/2.8L IS II, so much so that using the Canon 1.4x and cropping would likely produce as good an image as a third party 1.7x if one exists. Cropping would give you the field of view and DOF of a 510mm f/4.75


3

Some of your lenses might be usable on the 5D; others might not be. Specifically, any EF lens will be usable, but EF-S lenses won't be (see this question for the details). EF lenses have a red dot by the lens mount, and EF-S lenses have a white square.


3

You haven't said which body you want to use it on. If its crop sensor, you really need to look at the EFS 17-55 F2.8. It adds image stabilization and a full stop more speed. It has good bokeh when wide open.


3

Well I would say that based on this link, performance at f/4 is similar for both as far as sharpness goes. Distortion can be compared at this link. I'm not sure what you mean by blur, if you are talking about bokeh, neither of these are going to be great. You really need a prime, and even for that a lens this wide isn't going to produce much out of focus. ...


3

This thread on forum.mflenses.com concerns the same issue, and seems to answer the question. Poster SonicScot has the same problem and shows how it is caused by the focus ring extending further than the inner ring on the lens, which is supposed to touch the adapter. Clearly the focus ring is in the way of the adapter. I'd like to know if there's a way of ...


3

There no significant disadvantage (but see the link in the comment above). However when you say 28mm is an important focal length for you, I'm not sure if you are aware that on a an EOS T3 you have a crop frame sensor. The effect of this is that focal lengths quoted on lenses should be multiplied by about 1.6x to work out the equivalent focal length on a ...


3

Canon lenses with an Ultrasonic Motor have natural slippage between the focus ring and the lens' focusing elements. The technology for this type of AF motor was first developed by Canon, who refers to it as an UltraSonic Motor (USM). It has since been adopted by many lensmakers and is known by such monikers as Silent Wave Motor (SWM) - Nikon, Supersonic ...


2

What do you mean by "Bigger"? in camera land we talk about "length" (Focal length, in mm) and "speed" (how wide of an aperture it has then wide open, 2.8f, 1.4f etc etc) Your question has no definite answer. It depends entirely on budget, and subject.


2

You can use all EF and EF-S lenses. for the lens choice I suggest you to see suggestions by cameralabs.com, but it all depends on your needs and your budget.


2

4mm at the wide angle makes a lot of difference, especially compared to 4mm at the tele angle. My analogy is like this. Stand two chop sticks vertically next to each other on a table about 5cm apart. Now make a triangle with the top ends touching and hold it. Hold them so they cross each other and move down towards the table about 5cm. Now cross them at ...


2

I Googled online for an answer and also asked some people at the local camera store if they had any idea. I came to know that Canon has two 2x FD extenders FD 2X-A and FD 2X-B. Apparently FD 2X-A are for lenses 300mm or higher and FD 2X-B are for lenses below 300mm. So, I took a risk and bought a FD 2X-A extender from eBay and I was able to attach the ...


1

Actually, I don't think that Canon has continuous lens production as such. I believe they are built in batches, then stored and sold over time, and a new batch produced if and when needed, until the lens is finally discontinued. If so, this makes it hard to say when the "last" AFD lens was produced, as you never know if they are going to make another batch ...


1

Brian Smith has a roundup of various adapters for Sony E-mount cameras to mount many different types of lenses. In the "Canon EF to Sony E-Mount Lens Adapters" section, he lists the following adapters: Metabones Canon EF to Sony E-Mount Smart Adapter IV ($400) FotodioX AF Adapter for Canon EF to Sony E-Mount ($100) Viltrox Auto-focus Canon EF/EF-S Lens to ...


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