11

If you shoot under 400iso and don't print large, you won't notice much difference in the image quality. If you shoot higher ISOs, the Mk II has less noise. Practically speaking, the screen on the MK I is the most annoying thing if you're used to the MK II. Colour accuracy and sharpness during playback are poor compared to the MKII and newer cameras- and far ...


6

The primary advantage of the former is that it avoids necessitating the purchase of a CF-USB adapter to upload photos to my computer (and from thence to my hardrive). If this is your main reason then it is not worth it. I have a 40D, and bought an adaptor and a 16GB SD card. So far it all works fine, however removing the SD card from the adaptor is ...


6

The 5D mk2 was released in 2008, the mk3 in 2012, 4 years is a long time in technology. The mk3 is much better, it is better because of 4 years of sensor technology research, the pixel size makes a difference only if everything else is the same - and when you compare a models that have a 4 years difference everything isn't even close to the same. If you ...


5

For Landscape and Macro work there is very little difference between these two. That is assuming you are shooting RAW and manually focusing as is often the case for those two types of photography. The resolution difference is only about 2.4% in favor of the older 5D Mark II. At ISO 1600 and below the differences in sensor image quality are minimal. Above ...


5

I only have odd numbered 5Ds, but the pixel pitch is very similar between the 5DmkII and 5D mkIII so the results ought to hold up. Here's the same scene shot using a tripod under the same lighting, 1/8s exposure ISO 100, f/1.2 (using the Canon 85L). RAW, converted with ACR with the same settings (everything on zero with a linear tonecurve). I shot pairs of ...


5

The main benefits of the 5D MkII over the 5D MkI include: Addition of ISO 3200 and 6400 native ISOs 21MP over 13MP Addition of dust reduction features New menus and interface Vignetting correction built in AF Micro Adjustment 98% viewfinder instead of 96% Higher resolution larger LCD screen Live view for composition Twice the battery capacity/frames per ...


5

The Canon EOS 5D Mark IV has a built-in Wi-Fi radio with NFC (Near Field Communication) capability. It does not feature a built in radio transmitter for communicating with RT flashes. You'll need either a Canon ST-E3-RT or Yongnuo YN-E3-RT to control off-camera RT flashes using wireless radio. You could also use a wireless optical controller such as a Canon ...


4

This comparison at The-Digital-Picture between the 5D at ISO 3200 and the Rebel T5i/700D at ISO 1600 looks fairly even, especially if one considers the difference in scale. (I chose the T5i because the T6i samples are even larger.) The 5D and 5D Mark II look very close at the same ISO 3200 and so any comparisons you might find between the more recent Rebels/...


4

I wouldn't think too much about the pixel difference, you will probably not really notice it (if your not truly into testing of course). Here is a link that compare the two camera bodies: http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon_EOS_50D-vs-Canon_EOS_5D/detailed However, the two bodies are getting old, the 5D mk1 is over 11 years old by now and they are getting ...


4

Neither the 1D X nor the 5D Mark IV are "weatherproof." Canon refers to both as 'weather resistant'. If you use either in the rain and water damages the camera it is not covered under warranty. The main advantage with regard to weather resistance any of the 1-series cameras have over the other recent higher end models such as the 5D Mark IV and the 7D Mark ...


4

At the most basic level, one can surmise that Canon chose to include a low pass filter in the EOS 5Ds while also offering the EOS 5Ds R without¹ a low pass filter because they felt there was enough demand for both options in the marketplace to generate a worthwhile return on the additional investment during product developments as well as the additional ...


3

The specs do include Radio transmission wireless flash shooting among the features, so I can see how you got that impression. But they also list Optical transmission wireless flash shooting despite the fact that the 5DmkIV doesn't have the built-in flash that would be necessary for optically triggering an off-camera Speedlite. I can see how it might be ...


3

I would suggest rather than drawing directly on the ground glass focusing screen that you use a piece of clear laminate material to draw on. If you draw your desired lines onto paper, tape the plastic over the paper then trace your markings onto the laminate, you can try several different options depending on what you need. Once you find the perfect ...


3

I took my 5D Mark IV out in very windy and raining conditions at the beach recently. I was using a lens that had a mounting gasket seal and did not change lenses as the conditions were almost unbearable. The camera got very well saturated. This is my experience. During shooting I had issues with the touch screen registering water on it as presses. I just ...


2

60D for many reasons: The flip-out screen is very useful Much higher FPS It sounded like you are on a budget, being able to choose from both EF and EF-S lenses is a huge advantage. For image quality, you are comparing 18MP to 12MP, that is 60D having 50% more pixels than the 5D, also the ISO performance would not be that big a difference since the 5D is old,...


2

I had an EOS 350D and now have the 40D, neither of these allow much more than the very basic shutter release in Lightroom 4, I uninstalled EOS Utility and the Camera Window app packaged with them from Canon because one or the other popped up every time i plugged my phone into charge and told me there was no camera. I knew that...it's my phone after all. Back ...


2

The issue, at least as far as using EOS Utility is concerned when using just about any current Operating System, is that the current version of EOS Utility no longer supports tethering to the original 5D. If you choose to use EOS Utility, be sure to download it using the 5D support page, as the latest versions of EOS Utility no longer support the 5D. By ...


2

It initially looked to my eye more like it might be something else in the mirror box that is not moving out of the way fast enough, most likely a part of the secondary mirror assembly. The secondary mirror sits behind the main reflex mirror and reflects light into the AF sensor. But if you are experiencing this problem even when using mirror lockup then that ...


2

Watch out: the 5D is not weather sealed, but as it is, it an catch raindrops from some light rain and survive. Now, if you have cracks, if they are sufficiently deep, water can get in the camera, dust can get in as well, etc. Differentiate between cracks that start and end on the cover (so it is contained entirely) and those that end on an edge (button ...


2

Megapixels In my opinion is not that significant, except in the case you really need them of course, but the jump needs to be double, for example from 12 to 24. In my opinion, the best reason to upgrade a body is ISO sensitivity and noise. That difference can open you some new doors to use ambient light in a new way. Changing from a smaller sensor to full ...


2

The biggest issue with using an SD to CF card adapter is that most of them aren't that reliable. So even if you have a fairly high quality SD card in it, if the adapter causes issues while you are in the field shooting you will have no way to get your images recorded to the SD card. CF cards are some of the most robust and durable memory cards available. My ...


2

I know it's not quite what you're after, but DxOmark will give you a nice comparision of the 5D Mark II and T6i (aka 750D). That shows the 5D Mark II being a whole stop ahead of the 750D (1815 vs 919 on "Low Light ISO"). Given that, I'd be pretty confident that the 5D will beat out the 750D - there wasn't a stop's worth of improvement between the 5D and 5D ...


2

Moving from an APS-C camera released in 2013, and especially one that has a sensor that dates back to the release of the 7D in 2009, to a full frame camera with a more up-to-date sensor should give you some significant improvement in terms of noise when shooting at high ISO in low light situations. I find that I can use my FF cameras at about one stop ...


1

Unlike other answers (including ones I've upvoted) I always use a USB card reader with my CF cards, and have only had one failure from 3 cheap readers (plus a couple of more expensive ones and printers, hard drives with built in readers). A brand like belkin cost a similar amount to a fairly small card last time I checked; my cheap external ones cost around ...


1

There isn't necessarily a preferred method, because as you noted each option has its own pros and cons. Only you can make the decision what is right for you. You need to consider: Speed Cost - Sometimes SD cards can be cheaper Convenience - Adapters, size, existing computer slots Availability - Do you already have cards of one type? Reliability - Points ...


1

Unless your shutter speed is 1/30 second or slower most newer Canon EOS bodies will use first curtain sync regardless of what is selected in the menu of a compatible flash (or via the camera's menu itself if the camera has the capability of controlling the flash via the camera menu). I can find no mention of the requirement for a 1/30 second or slower ...


1

Depends on where the cracks are, if they allow light into the camera and what kind of conditions you plan to be shooting in. If they are on more cosmetic parts, it probably doesn't matter at all. They may eventually be failure points, but if they are on replaceable parts, it doesn't matter too much. I'd certainly ask for photos of the cracks as well as ...


1

I think the ideal camera for each use case is different, so will try to answer them individually. My main interest is Large Landscape panoramas and macro. As I also do Photographic Safari guiding I also do a fair amount of wildlife and Birding. Large Landscape Panoramas Canon 6D. You're most likely after lots of detail, very little noise, and nice wide ...


1

I can't find details about the sensor read out on the 5D, but the only way this could be a shutter problem is if the sensor read out is top to bottom then left to right (which is not the way it is generally done on newer models, but I'm not sure how they may have done it on older models.) Even then, it would seem a bit odd that it spends so long with the ...


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