3

Those L lenses age very well. Meaning, there is almost no reason to quickly upgrade to the newer models. It is very reasonable to keep your "old" lenses. Yes, the IS is better now but that's really small differences in really high end products. So I'd start with getting a current body and start shooting. The "old" lenses won't hinder you in any way. IF you ...


2

Since you've set down photography and are revisiting it now, it's my guess that the question is less about the camera, but how you'll feel getting back into it, and what the activity will mean for you/how you'll use it. (If you know this, sharing would help the recommendation.) For that reason, I'd suggest the best value-buy in the ballpark of your skill. ...


2

I would add that it could be a sticky aperture problem. Whilst in DOF mode the aperture blades did close, during the fast shutter moment, it may not have enough time to react. I had a similar problem with one of my yongnuo lenses. I could temporarily remedy the problem by repeatedly doing a DOF preview until the aperture blades had loosened. When I took ...


1

The 5DIII is great for photography. The improvements in the 5D generations for photography are mostly in high iso, homogeneity in noise and definition. It has 3 AF in video: quick (through optical viewfinder and classical AF), AF (you put the zone and ask for focus), and AF with face tracking. It's OK but far from the dual pixel AF you get in 5DIV, Canon R ...


1

I also see yellow noise along with the magenta. Possibilities. 1) Possibly processing artifacts from in camera or in post. Are you shooting RAW or jpeg? Is it happening in the original image or in post processing? 2) Reflections from colored objects in the room or light coming though a window or relecting off glass and creating a prism effect. 3) ...


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