11

It all depends on the scene in terms of overall brightness, the total dynamic range, and how fine the graduations are between bright and dark. The wider the difference is between the brightest part and the darkest part of the scene, the further apart your darkest and brightest exposures need to be. The best way to measure this is to use your camera's ...


10

There are two main possibilities I can think of. The easiest is that you may have inadvertently adjusted the diopter setting on your view finder. This would make the entire thing look slightly blurry. If this is the problem, fixing it should be as simple as adjusting the diopter dial near the viewfinder itself. The other potential problem is that the ...


8

Both the official Canon replacement part and many of the third party replacement parts offered on eBay show 3M tape already attached to the back of the replacement grip. I'd follow their lead as others have suggested and use 3M VHB, 3M 300LSE, or 3M 200MP (for other grips on the 550D), as it seems to be what Canon and third party makers use. Or you could ...


7

Reduce the image size. You surely don't want your customers to download dozens of 18 megapixel images just to see spinning products. That won't be the kind of user experience that makes people reach for their wallets. And if you don't need all that resolution, you don't need to record it all in the first place. Try smaller images. Use an intervalometer to ...


7

Micro SD to SD adaptors are just passive wiring adaptors. So they should not have any impact on speed.


6

In practice, when the scene has a large dynamic range, you need to take many exposures despite the fact that in theory a few exposures suffice to cover the entire dynamic range. You may want to limit the exposure time for a very dark part of a scene. When shooting with a tripod at night there may be some wind causing unsharpness due to shaking when you ...


5

A Canon 50mm f/1.8 prime lens is quite decent for taking portraits from close proximity. The Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 is a wide-angle lens and would give you significant results when taking the picture of the concert hall from a distance. Both lenses have their own pros for concert photography. The 50mm f/1.8 has the added advantage of taking good quality ...


5

Three exposures are often enough, and so are two. While there are scenes that need more, you have diminished return for every additional exposure. Consider that a single frame from a modern DSLR can capture at least 10 stops, sometimes over 14, two frames can potentially hold 20+ stops of dynamic range. You need some overlap though so that it can be merged, ...


5

This photo looks vibrant because the photographer made it vibrant, either through a filter (smartphone) or via editing. The camera did nothing but take the photo, the same as your good camera and lens can. The difference is the photographer. This image has good light, an obviously well planned location and props, a photographer who is engaging the child, ...


5

Though I mainly agree with Juhist's answer I feel there is an alternative, with far less outlay. (Though we would still like to see some specific images with some specific, named issues) If your issue is lighting, making focus &/or camera shake an issue, then why fix it with faster lenses for several hundred dollars, when you could fix it with… lighting....


4

Instructions for using the RC-6 with your camera can be found on page 204 of your instruction manual. In order for the remote to work, you must place your camera in the timer/remote shooting mode. It won't accept IR shutter release unless it is in this mode.


4

There are two different types of Autofocus in most DSLR's. There is PDAF (or phase detect autofocus) and CDAF (contrast detect autofocus). PDAF uses a special focus sensor to measure the phase of the light coming from different parts of the lens (which is much faster) while CDAF uses the actual image sensor to look for the highest contrast it can get (...


4

Are the files on the SD card are the same for both camera models? No. Is it safe to boot Magic Lantern from any card in any camera (or at least on these two models)? You should assume absolutely not. You can inspect the Magic Lantern source code yourself. But a strong hint is that the Magic Lantern binary download is specific to each camera model. In ...


4

Double-stick tape works well for this. Not even anything fancy — just the Scotch brand you can find everywhere. Trim to fit the body and press the detached bit back.


4

The reason was that I am using Windows 10 N, which comes without the MTP driver. One has to install the Microsoft Media Feature Pack, in order to get this driver. Windows Update does not find it automatically. Moreover, for me it did not work out to install this version of the driver which is linked almost everywhere. Instead, I had to install the 1803 ...


3

What you want to do should actually be possible. First of all, you'll want to download the Canon SDK (Software Development Kit) from http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/standard_display/sdk_homepage. Since you appear to be in Europe, your page is http://www.didp.canon-europa.com/ (found from the Canon USA page linked above). It indicates the SDK is ...


3

The short answer is yes, they are trustworthy but your question seems to be more orientated towards the 'should you go for the cheaper version' kind of area. In some cases, people would consider the Tamron/Sigma equivalent to be better, but that's subjective and can take into account many things such as build quality, features, price and of course picture ...


3

Sounds to me like the camera is shooting RAW and hitting the buffer limit. Try setting the image quality option to JPEG fine instead and see if that fixes it.


3

You should also be able to see this same scale in the viewfinder. What that scale represents, in part, depends on what shooting mode your camera is in. If you are in an automated mode (Av/Tv/P/Auto, the scene modes, etc), then it acts as an exposure compensation scale. It is marked off in exposure values (EV), or stops. Dialing it to the + side of the ...


3

I had the same problem with my Rebel T3i, and through Canon support I found the actual solution. On the T31, there is a movie mode menu you have to get to. To do so, you have to first put the camera in movie mode, THEN press the menu key. When you do that, a movie menu pops up, and one of the items is "Remote." It will be either enabled or disabled. So ...


3

When you say viewfinder, do you mean the small glass thingie that you peer through with one eye, or the large LCD screen on the back of the camera? The glass thingie (what most people call the viewfinder) does not, and cannot, show the effect of changing exposure settings. Granted, there is a depth-of-field preview button below the lens mount release button, ...


2

HAD the same problem but looking through the internet I finally found a workaround. The only thing to do is to do it in the right order! Camera - PC [no connection] Open your camera [let it boot -even if you have Magic Lantern-] Turn it to M [-manual] Insert USB cable to the PC first Insert USB to camera ..it worked for me like a charm


2

While it's certainly overkill for the original problem I found a device that can trigger different groups of flashes quickly after each other. According to this article the Pocket Wizard Plus III and MultiMax have a feature called Speed Cycler. This function allows to trigger different (groups of) flashes in rapid succession.


2

You can attach any UVC-compliant web cam to a Linux computer (including a Raspberry Pi) and use the excellent Motion package to do the motion detection. It has the option to run a command when it sees motion, and you can set it up to call GPhoto2 and take a picture with your attached T2i.


2

Aperture < Preferences < Import < Standard Previews I began noticing the same issue. I work with social media nearly 100% of the time so I don't shoot in RAW that often because I need to generate decent photos quickly and get them online (my iPad data plan would hate me if I started uploading those file sizes too haha!). Following the above path ...


2

Without modification, the Canon EOS 550D (Rebel T2i) is not suitable for infrared photography. Even with modification, the sensor stack of some Canon cameras still appears to be insensitive to IR compared with other cameras. There is likely an element, other than the hot mirror, that blocks a significant amount of IR. Based on a diagram in this modification ...


2

It may be due to the latch not releasing properly. Try lifting the cover of the flash while pressing the flash button.


2

What would be easier to do accurately is to have a system that combines a timing function with a system that gives an index signal at the start of a revolution and then series of pulses indicating rotational increments. This is easy to do in a number of ways. Use of an Arduino or similar could see the core part implemented for under $10*. Once you have the ...


2

There is an app for macOS called EOS Inspector. Download it on the Mac App Store and then connect your camera via USB cable to get accurate shutter actuations count measurement. For detailed information about camera compatibility please refer to the tech specs page. Long story short: it works with all modern Canon EOS cameras, including the recent models ...


2

You can use all lenses with a Canon "EF" mount. You cannot use lenses with a Canon "EF-s" mount; those lenses are for APS-C sensors only. The 6D is full format.


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