17

The chances of bricking your camera are extremely low (but not zero). I think something not everybody understands is the Magic Lantern does not install into your camera but to the SD card. My understanding is that the only change that is done to your camera is to enable the "bootdisk" flag, which is a very minor change. This flag tells the camera if it ...


15

For changing the shutter speed, put the mode dial on Tv (as in the image below: make sure the white line corresponds to the letters Tv ), and turn the wheel high-lighted in red below (excuse my crappy images, I edited all this as something quick and dirty). On your LCD screen, you can see the below screen (let me know if you don't know how to get to this ...


11

There is nothing wrong with your Aperture setup. RAW files are like film negatives, they need to be processed so they can be viewed/displayed as intended. Your camera does not show the RAW file when you press play and preview the image but rather a JPEG image that has been processed in-camera. This is known as a sidecar file. The software that came with ...


11

Normally I'd suggest upgrading lenses and not bodies but in this case going to the 6D is going to solve your two problems: The 6D has significantly better low light performance than the T2i/550D Your 50mm will have the same field of view on the 6D as a 30mm on the T2i I recommend you get the 6D and then maybe, if you miss the field of view of a 50mm on a ...


11

It all depends on the scene in terms of overall brightness, the total dynamic range, and how fine the graduations are between bright and dark. The wider the difference is between the brightest part and the darkest part of the scene, the further apart your darkest and brightest exposures need to be. The best way to measure this is to use your camera's ...


10

There are two main possibilities I can think of. The easiest is that you may have inadvertently adjusted the diopter setting on your view finder. This would make the entire thing look slightly blurry. If this is the problem, fixing it should be as simple as adjusting the diopter dial near the viewfinder itself. The other potential problem is that the ...


9

Play with the kit lens for a while. Then take a look at the photos you took, and find the ones you like. Make a list of things you like or don't like about the photos. If most of your photos end up near the same focal length, or you keep saying "I wish the background was more blurred" you should get a prime at that focal length. Ex: EF 50mm f/1.4 USM If ...


8

Both the official Canon replacement part and many of the third party replacement parts offered on eBay show 3M tape already attached to the back of the replacement grip. I'd follow their lead as others have suggested and use 3M VHB, 3M 300LSE, or 3M 200MP (for other grips on the 550D), as it seems to be what Canon and third party makers use. Or you could ...


7

Reduce the image size. You surely don't want your customers to download dozens of 18 megapixel images just to see spinning products. That won't be the kind of user experience that makes people reach for their wallets. And if you don't need all that resolution, you don't need to record it all in the first place. Try smaller images. Use an intervalometer to ...


7

Micro SD to SD adaptors are just passive wiring adaptors. So they should not have any impact on speed.


6

The lens has a maximum magnification of 1:3.7, or 0.27 (augh, editing! The decimal number is created by dividing the first number by the last, and I got it super wrong) so it's really not that good a macro lens. By comparison, your current lens's maximum magnification is either 0.28 or 0.34 depending on whether it's the IS one or not, so it's actually higher....


6

In this instance they are merely referring to taking both lenses with you and using them interchangeably to provide continuous coverage from 18 - 250mm. The article uses the word "effective" to indicate the full frame equivalent range of 29 - 400mm, which covers the vast majority of photographic subjects. There are types of lenses that can be coupled, for ...


5

I have a tip regarding recompose if you do it after focus lock. As a lowlight shooter with a camera that has a more accurate center point, it is very useful to focus with the high contrast part of the subject with the center point. It is easy to get out of focus with a narrow DOF that comes with shooting wide open with an F1.4-1.8 prime. Take a look at ...


5

While this solution does not use a webcam, it does what you want. The Magic Lantern custom firmware can be downloaded for free and includes, among many other interesting features, motion detection functionality. The firmware is not installed on the camera but on the memory card. If you don't like it, just format the memory card. It supports a wide range of ...


5

In theory the camera manufacturer can make the processing exactly the same or completely different since they have full control over what goes into the camera and the raw processor. It's both "common knowledge" and "common sense" that the in-camera an stand alone raw convertor from the same company will produce the same results, except for the converter ...


5

A Canon 50mm f/1.8 prime lens is quite decent for taking portraits from close proximity. The Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 is a wide-angle lens and would give you significant results when taking the picture of the concert hall from a distance. Both lenses have their own pros for concert photography. The 50mm f/1.8 has the added advantage of taking good quality ...


5

Three exposures are often enough, and so are two. While there are scenes that need more, you have diminished return for every additional exposure. Consider that a single frame from a modern DSLR can capture at least 10 stops, sometimes over 14, two frames can potentially hold 20+ stops of dynamic range. You need some overlap though so that it can be merged, ...


5

In practice, when the scene has a large dynamic range, you need to take many exposures despite the fact that in theory a few exposures suffice to cover the entire dynamic range. You may want to limit the exposure time for a very dark part of a scene. When shooting with a tripod at night there may be some wind causing unsharpness due to shaking when you ...


5

This photo looks vibrant because the photographer made it vibrant, either through a filter (smartphone) or via editing. The camera did nothing but take the photo, the same as your good camera and lens can. The difference is the photographer. This image has good light, an obviously well planned location and props, a photographer who is engaging the child, ...


5

Though I mainly agree with Juhist's answer I feel there is an alternative, with far less outlay. (Though we would still like to see some specific images with some specific, named issues) If your issue is lighting, making focus &/or camera shake an issue, then why fix it with faster lenses for several hundred dollars, when you could fix it with… lighting....


4

A correction: the Moon subtends 0.5 degrees, not "about 1". I have taken good Moon shots using my Celestron C8 telescope OTA in conjunction with a focal reducer - equivalent to 1000mm / f/6.3 - using my Pentax K100D at prime focus. The image closely fills the 2/3 sensor, maximizing the use of the available pixels. Which is only 6M for the Pentax, but still ...


4

Ideally, if you want to get as close as possible with minimum noise, you should rent out a high-quality 600mm lens like the Canon 600mm f/4L IS, the kind wildlife photographers use (typical 2012 rate: $400 for 5 days). The moon occupies a very small angular range and the less cropping you have to do the better. However if you're willing to raise ISO a little ...


4

I haven't bricked my 550 by putting Magic Lantern on it... but the plural of "anecdote" is not "data", so I'm not quite sure what you're hoping to get out of this. The biggest risk is probably that if you need to send your camera in to Canon for repair for any reason, they might refuse to service it because you ran Magic Lantern on it.


4

I have done this a few times with other canons, not the 7D though, my question to you is are you comfortable with micro assembly, very fragile connectors, documenting your take down etc? Typically they use small Philips and some specialized ones as well take a look here for a visual guide. Their are other issues, such as needing a special pry tool you ...


4

The aperture of that lens is 3.5 - 5.6. That means that that lens will not give you a very shallow depth of field, but in most cases it will be enough. If you shoot manually or in aperture priority mode, remember to always have the f-stop (apeture) number as low as possible. Shutter-speed and iso will not effect depth of field. A tip if you want a ...


4

I suspect that the difference here comes down to tone curves, part of what Canon calls "Picture Styles". These are things like "Standard", "Neutral", "Portrait" and so on. Some cameras also have settings like "Bright" and "Vivid". A digital sensor is a linear device, and counts photons in a flat way. Human vision follows a curve, and so in order for the ...


4

The aspect ratio of images from the 550D is 3:2, like the majority of DSLRs. To avoid distortion, you have to resize to the same aspect ratio. 200x150 is 4:3 which does not match, but if you did 225x150, then there will be no distortion. To get a different aspect-ratio without distortion, you have to crop first and that implies deciding which part of the ...


4

I think the easiest tool to use would be IrfanView. You can select it to maintain the aspect ratio, and it uses advanced interpolation techniques to still have a high quality image of your original input (resample, not resize)


4

When you take a picture with a flash, the flash discharges from a bank of capacitors for a given time to regulate the flash power. The higher power the flash, the longer the flash is discharged for, and thus, the more power is used and the longer recharge takes. The most common solution for your problem is to alter the criteria so that you can take more ...


4

Instructions for using the RC-6 with your camera can be found on page 204 of your instruction manual. In order for the remote to work, you must place your camera in the timer/remote shooting mode. It won't accept IR shutter release unless it is in this mode.


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