14

Is it usually safe to leave the camera strap on the camera body itself for long exposure shots? It's fine. If you're concerned about wind catching the strap and causing blur (or even flying up into the shot) you can roll it up and secure it with a rubber band or zip tie. But if there's enough wind to move the strap, there's probably enough wind to shake the ...


12

If you wear it as intended, or even not quite as intended please excuse the "fine art" ;-) Then there's the possibility it can fall off. If you wear it not as intended, over your head then it has no escape.


6

The risk with leaving the strap on the camera while on the tripod comes down to: Risk of unintentional snagging: If you, another person, or maybe pet, were moving close by the camera, it's possible to snag the strap while moving, and disturbing the shot (at best), or pulling the the rig and possibly dropping the camera to the ground. Wind catching strap and ...


5

It appears to be a Canon EW-100 BM neck strap that was offered as an optional accessory with many of the film EOS models, in the late 1980s to mid-2000s. The solid red EW-100 MA was also offered by Canon as an optional accessory concurrently with the EW-100 BM. The EW-100 BM was the standard strap supplied with lower end models such as the 35mm film EOS Ti/...


5

The whole socket on my 5D3 Came away today. It popped out of the body whilst I was adjusting a tripod head. I use a Black Rapid shoulder strap. I can only assume that has weakened it over time. Just glad I had it in my hands at the time.


5

Here are various reasons that I may choose to use a hand strap, shoulder strap (never around the neck), monopod, or tripod: Hand Strap - I don't currently have a hand strap and have not used one for a couple of years, my gear is just too heavy at this point. Fast lenses on prosumer DSLRs are too heavy for me to carry with just a hand strap for 5 hours at a ...


5

I have done this on my D800, I assume they are exactly the same. So first remove the plastic clips, just push them HARD towards the on-camera mounting post, they should just pop off. Then remove the triangular rings, they are VERY stuff so you may need a flat-head screwdriver to pry the end open, just rotate them around like a key-ring and off they come. ...


4

These are split rings and can be found in a few places in this format... For example: Amazon - Hama Split Rings or EBay (claimed) genuine Nikon set.


4

Looks like a split ring, often used for keys, but these are much smaller and triangular. The little plastic bit seems to keep it from rotating, but if you had a circular one it wouldn't be a problem. Normal split rings can be found at WalMart or a hardware store, though maybe not small enough. Something like this might be found in an arts and crafts store.


4

I think as long as there isn't a lot of wind, it isn't a problem stability wise. What I have seen people express is the potential for snagging the strap on yourself and accidentally pulling the tripod over.


3

There isn't really any comparison between a shoulder strap or a monopod. A shoulder strap is used to carry a camera when not in use and to keep it easily accessible. A good shoulder strap is highly recommended as it both makes it more comfortable to have the camera at the ready as well as being a nice safety feature to prevent it from hitting the ground if ...


3

As others have mentioned, I recommend using a quick release system for your standard strap. The one I use is a Tamrac N-15 and, when disconnected, it leaves behind a minimal amount of strapping that stays mostly out of the way. For your BlackRapid (or any sling strap for that matter), I use a tiny, 1-inch, Arca Swiss clamp made by Kirk Enterprises. This way,...


3

Personally I use a Black Rapid Double Breathe and usually carry two gripped full frame bodies, two pro lenses (usually 24-70 + 70-200 (occasionly with a 2x)) along with flashes. No problem. It also comes apart into two seperate single harnesses if you only have one body with you (you can use a double harness with one camera... but it sits lop sided and you ...


3

Are these holes appropriate for attaching a wrist strap? No. Those holes are for the bottom and side microphones. They are not meant to mount a strap to. Or is there another way? Sure. You can use one of the built-in folding mount fingers bosses on the bottom. Just fold one or both of the fingers down to loop the strap through the hole with a simple cow ...


2

I was also thinking about attaching a strap to my tripod mount screw, so was researching what people thought of this. I came across a few troubling posts and pictures in this thread: http://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-126099-1.html#2137034 http://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-126099-2.html#2137615 One is a plastic body where the plastic gave way. The other is a ...


2

The problem with any OEM Nikon parts is that you have to be a Nikon Service Center to get them. Nikon no longer ships replacement parts to dealers or camera repair shops. In your case, that isn't as terrible as it may sound. The parts you are looking for are generally called split rings. On most cameras they are round. A few camera straps, like this one, ...


2

Peak Design make several Arca-Swiss compatible plates that can be used with a D-ring screw. So you could clip the BlackRapid strap onto that. Look at their ARCAplate, which includes the D-ring screw. Note that has now been replaced by the PROplate, which doesn't have a D-ring as standard. But you can use it with the Pro Drive Screw, which has a D-ring. ...


2

A lot of amateurs use a wrist strap that helps hold the camera to the right hand. In 30+ years of moving around in photographic circles, I've never seen a single professional photographer (defined as someone whose primary income is derived from taking still pictures) using one. Ever. They are available in a wide range of materials, designs, and prices. One ...


2

This answer is wrong, see the one of Michael Clark. Your strap really is blue, my bad... Short answer : this kind of strap is still being sold with new cameras The "retro" vibe sure looks like exposure to the sun and the associated color desaturation, my Canon 7D has a very similar type of strap (but with a second red strip). From what I know, Canon used ...


2

I'm not familiar with any strap that meets all of your requirements. The trend over the past few years is to move away from one piece straps, such as those supplied with cameras, to modular systems that allow each user the flexibility of setting up a strap in different ways for different use cases and shooting situations. Neoprene has become a popular ...


2

Simplr's F1 strap would fit your wishes (although the answer is a bit late). I just find them too expensive for such a simple strap! Otherwise they seem to be nice.


2

I use an Op/Tech Double Sling. It's as comfortable as any other strap I've ever used, and more comfortable than most. The modular OP/TECH system makes it easy to swap a camera from the harness to a single strap in mere seconds. It also allows the camera to be easily and quickly disconnected from the harness and stored in a case or backpack with only the ...


1

When climbing, my camera strap rig was Dyneema girth hitched to each lug (something like this: https://www.rei.com/product/899001/black-diamond-10mm-dynex-runner) and a modified gear sling attached to each of those (https://www.rei.com/product/620114/metolius-multi-loop-contour-gear-sling). Dyneema and webbing ain't going anywhere. This is what we call, ...


1

Neoprene straps are popular because they increase comfort and reduce strain on the users muscles and joints. That said, it seems you just need to buy a roll of webbing and sew the strap to the desired specifications yourself. Don't forget to sear the ends of the webbing so it doesn't come unraveled.


1

For a simple camera strap, I like Couch Guitar Straps. In particular, their recycled seatbelt straps. The seatbelt material is nice, pretty lightweight and flexible, but seems strong enough. It easily slides on your shoulder as you lift the camera up. As it's fairly wide, it helps spread the weight of the camera on your shoulder. The length can be adjusted, ...


1

Op-Tech's Lens Loop is one such product that has connectors that allow them to be used with a plethora of straps they offer. Use of the loop allows a quick release plate to remain attached to the lens' tripod foot. I have not personally used the Lens Loop myself. I do use the Op-Tech system and have been very happy with both a Canon Professional Services ...


1

Aside from the snap and lock feature, which you note most cameras do not have, there does appears to be nothing particularly special about the Canon AKT-DC1 neck strap. Especially if you want it to not float, straps made of any material should do. As @Mikkel notes, you can "make" your own with bungee cord and bolt-snaps. Bungee cords come in various lengths ...


1

If "push them HARD towards the on-camera mounting post" reads like alien language to you, here's a Youtube video showing how to remove the rings. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lRqfZU7Gzg


1

Monopod: (+) Added stability when taking photo (+) Can be used to support you by leaning on it/used as a walking stick (-) Can be bulky/difficult to carry Neck/shoulder strap: (+) Provides a safety net should you drop your camera (-) Having heavy gear around your neck/shoulder can give you neck/shoulder ache The ideal solution is to have a separate ...


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