25

Upon viewing his portfolio at the link you provided, my first thought was push processing. In push processing, one typically underexposes the shot (that is, meters and set exposure as if the the film were a higher ISO than it really is), then compensate in the darkroom by overdeveloping the film to account for the underexposed shot. Push processing tends to ...


24

shutter speed 0.5 seconds This is likely to be a bit of your problem. The shutter causes vibration of the camera. So, too, does your hand pushing the release button. At faster speeds, this vibration does not affect the shot. Likewise, at very slow speeds (a few seconds +). But there’s a sweet spot somewhere between a second or two and ~1/30 where that ...


22

If you want to achieve this digitally note how the whites aren't full white and the blacks aren't full black. You can do that e.g. in Lightroom or any other editing tool by pulling the endpoints for the highlights and shadows towards the middle. To get a creamy tint, select the RGB Blue-Channel and reduce the Highlights-max Point. This bumps up the yellow:...


19

All of these scenes have something in common: they’re high contrast with many, many stops between the shadows and the highlights. If you were to meter for the shadows, then you’d blow the highlights (image 3). Meter for the highlights, and drown the shadows (images 1 and 2). Because you set evaluative metering, the whole frame is being taken into account ...


11

In low-light settings the quality is just not good, blurry. I really just do travel photography so don't have time to mess with settings if I am capturing scenes of people out at night in a busy Chinese pedestrian street, for example. Then get a good phone that does computational photography very well. It will think for you more than and better than any ...


10

Is setting the aperture without the lens even possible? Considering that the aperture is a part of the lens, not the camera body, no, it is not possible. Telescopes do not typically have variable apertures — there's no need to stop down to limit incoming light (which is absolutely the opposite of what is wanted for star photography), and depth of field ...


9

If those were film images, I'd say they were "overexposed" by about one stop and developed at N-1 (pull 1) to ensure well filled shadows. They may also have been printed on a warm-tone paper, and the prints preflashed to rein in the whites. Presuming they're digital in origin, it's likely filters with similar results were applied in post Generally, this ...


8

I don't think this model has a built-in light meter. The dial you are referring to is just a reminder indicator. You set it when you load film and then weeks later when you pick up the camera, you consult the dial setting to remind you what film you have loaded. Use a hand-held light meter or the "Sunny f/16 Rule" to set your camera.


8

More an addendum to Hueco's answer than a stand-alone... In very high contrast scenes, unless you're going to bracket your shots for HDR, then it's better to err on the dark side. Shadows can be recovered to some extent in post, but blown highlights are forever gone. This is what Photoshop made of your shots, simply by hitting 'Auto' in Camera RAW. You ...


8

When i press it down its like something inside the camera closes and then when you press again it captures the image and the view finder opens back up This sounds like Mirror Lock Up functionality. This mode allows one to separate the mechanism for the mirror and shutter so as to allow for any vibrations caused by the mirror to dissipate before taking the ...


8

Don't worry — the RAW files are the full resolution. They contain all of the data recorded by the camera. The option to change resolution is grayed out because there's no in-camera way to reduce it, not because it is stuck on small. However, for that data to be viewed, it need to be interpreted. See What does an unprocessed RAW file look like? for more on ...


7

It appears your aperture is still too open for the subject to be entirely in focus, at the current distance between the lens and the subject. You could tackle this issue in three ways: 1) Close down the aperture An open aperture will result in a narrow depth-of-field (DOF). The DOF entails the area in the image that is in acceptably sharp focus. Seeing ...


7

Your underlying problem seems to be how to take (better) photos quickly, not what camera you should get. While equipment can make more of a difference than some would like to believe, it seems you have not yet reached the limits of your current gear. Switching cameras may even slow you down. Recently, I met someone with a brand-new full-frame Nikon DSLR ...


6

Based on the article posted here, it seems that this lens sharpness does not increase with aperture size reduction: https://www.imaging-resource.com/lenses/sony/e-16-50mm-f3.5-5.6-pz-oss-selp1650/review/ Sharpness At 16mm and f/3.5, the Sony E 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 PZ OSS is fairly soft in the corners and across much of the frame, but the very center of ...


6

From one of your comments: I only have the one lens that came with my Rebel T3 Assuming that's the 18-55 kit lens or something similar, this will be far more significant than the body or the brand you are using. If you changed to (say) the 17-55 f/2.8, you'd get two stops of improvement at 55mm. Change to the 50mm f/1.4 and you'd get another two stops ...


6

No one can really give you an answer because the answer is completely dependent on your lighting set-up, as Michael C commented. But, you have some wrong assumptions that I wanted to point out. There are two types of set-ups you might use, continuous lighting or strobes. Strobes Shutter speed is relatively slow Maybe correct, it really depends on your ...


5

Most product photos simply have an overexposed background, therefore meter the subject/product, then use lights to push the background exposure two stops above the subject. My tips for a standard setup would be; Take care with the white balance if shooting jpeg. Shoot bracketed with a selection of exposures. This toy dog was ISO: 200, shutter 1/100, and ...


5

Check your telescope manual and find the telescope's aperture. Assuming no telescope eyepiece is utilized, the camera is said to be at the "prime focus" position. Find the scope's diameter. Find the scope's focal length. Divide focal length by diameter. The results of this math is the working f number of the system. Example: 1000mm focal length 4 inch ...


5

To get the entirety of a subject in focus, you need to increase Depth of Field. Increase F-number (decrease aperture). I would not use an aperture smaller than F8-11 because of diffraction. Increase distance. Decrease focal length. Another technique you can consider using is tilt-shift. This allows you to align the focal plane with your subject. Since you ...


4

Increasing the aperture will increase the effect of diffraction. To make photos with big DoF you need to apply technique as focus stacking. Focus stacking (also known as focal plane merging and z-stacking or focus blending) is a digital image processing technique which combines multiple images taken at different focus distances to give a resulting ...


4

You could try applying a post-processing filter to make it sharper. Some manufactures automatically apply a post-sharpening filter (namely Nikon) to squeeze out even more sharpness. Here is what your image looks like after applying the Shake Reduction filter in Photoshop: You could go crazy and add a lot of sharpening, but then the image starts to get a bit ...


4

I know this thread is years old, but I had the same issue on a recently acquired second hand EOS M5, and this is how I fixed it. Transpires that on the M5 when you select a drive mode other than single shot the image review is automatically disabled, and the option in the set-up menu becomes greyed out to the setting of OFF as well. Switching back to ...


4

The Nikon you're looking at is a slightly higher-end model and several years newer, and probably enough so that you'll see measurable differences in processing performance, autofocus speed, etc. You say you've compared all of the specs, so you know this stuff. However, this by itself will not make your images better. Or, would I really need to go full-...


4

Yes I realize that about the lenses, I only have the one lens that came with my Rebel T3 so not too concerned about that. Actually, you should be very concerned about this. There is no such thing as a Do-It-All lens. Every lens is built with tradeoffs - whether that be image quality, max aperture, ability to zoom, IS, size/weight, price, etc. You need to ...


4

Turns out you have to set the cameras time zone and time.


4

Get an idea on the spectral sensitivity and quantum efficiency of your camera. The data are provided by the camera manufacturer and/or chip manufacturer. It's easier for monochrome cameras as there is no colour filter (bayer pattern) involved. They are also more light sensitive. CCDs are more sensitive than CMOS and CCD is also more linear. (Your Canon ...


3

You can not have a "standard" if you leave the main variables at random. And the main, main, main and I can not understate main is "the lighting". KEEP CALM and Define your lighting I will repeat what @Hueco said. The aperture defines the DoF. You do not want a blurry image, you want to show the product as sharp as possible, so the aperture could be around ...


3

There are no camera settings that will create pixel intensities that correspond linearly to the number of photons. The conversion from raw camera sensor data to an image is non-linear. To get something proportional to photons, you will need to access the raw file directly. This is non-trivial, the file format is complicated, and some of the processing steps ...


3

With selective grade contrast papers and a variety of film processes you can achieve these results. I don't know if there's negative combinations or pre-flashing of the paper, but all of these are easily achieved in the darkroom after a couple of weeks of practice. I hate to say it but these appear to be pretty simple- so the fact that they're interesting ...


3

If you're holding all exposure parameters constant, then the next suspect for me would be your white-balance setting, which I don't see mentioned above; e.g., do you have auto-white-balance (AWB) enabled, or set to a fixed temp? Remember that most cameras are designed to interpret any scene you throw at them as 18% gray and compensate for that. If that's ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible