25

Upon viewing his portfolio at the link you provided, my first thought was push processing. In push processing, one typically underexposes the shot (that is, meters and set exposure as if the the film were a higher ISO than it really is), then compensate in the darkroom by overdeveloping the film to account for the underexposed shot. Push processing tends to ...


23

If you want to achieve this digitally note how the whites aren't full white and the blacks aren't full black. You can do that e.g. in Lightroom or any other editing tool by pulling the endpoints for the highlights and shadows towards the middle. To get a creamy tint, select the RGB Blue-Channel and reduce the Highlights-max Point. This bumps up the yellow:...


9

If those were film images, I'd say they were "overexposed" by about one stop and developed at N-1 (pull 1) to ensure well filled shadows. They may also have been printed on a warm-tone paper, and the prints preflashed to rein in the whites. Presuming they're digital in origin, it's likely filters with similar results were applied in post Generally, this ...


4

Get an idea on the spectral sensitivity and quantum efficiency of your camera. The data are provided by the camera manufacturer and/or chip manufacturer. It's easier for monochrome cameras as there is no colour filter (bayer pattern) involved. They are also more light sensitive. CCDs are more sensitive than CMOS and CCD is also more linear. (Your Canon ...


4

Update: Maybe this helps someone in the future reading this. I found that the problem was not with the camera at all. It was the flash trigger. (The transmitter) I was using a Viper TTL System. I emailed them and told them of the problem. They checked it and found that there was a glitch. A few weeks later they emailed me (as promised) and sent me a link to ...


4

I know this thread is years old, but I had the same issue on a recently acquired second hand EOS M5, and this is how I fixed it. Transpires that on the M5 when you select a drive mode other than single shot the image review is automatically disabled, and the option in the set-up menu becomes greyed out to the setting of OFF as well. Switching back to ...


4

Just about all modern digital cameras automatically capture EXIF metadata in the image files they record; I can't think of a camera that doesn't. This EXIF data includes date & time of capture, camera model number, and most importantly, exposure settings — aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. There are a few cases where this can't be captured, but for most ...


4

Your question covers several aspects; I will try to answer them here. Your two problems are: The Sky is missing vibrant colors The foreground is too dark, almost black Let's start with the first problem. It is common for Out-of-camera sunrise or sunset photos not to look very colorful. This is because fo white balance. Basically, WB determines how warm or ...


4

I only used a lens which only goes up to f5.4, is this the issue? The F-number in lens specs is usually the max aperture (lowest F-number). Most lenses are capable of closing the aperture to obtain smaller apertures (higher F-number). Make sure the entire product fits within the Depth of Field. DOF is region around the focal plane where subjects will appear ...


3

If you're holding all exposure parameters constant, then the next suspect for me would be your white-balance setting, which I don't see mentioned above; e.g., do you have auto-white-balance (AWB) enabled, or set to a fixed temp? Remember that most cameras are designed to interpret any scene you throw at them as 18% gray and compensate for that. If that's ...


3

With selective grade contrast papers and a variety of film processes you can achieve these results. I don't know if there's negative combinations or pre-flashing of the paper, but all of these are easily achieved in the darkroom after a couple of weeks of practice. I hate to say it but these appear to be pretty simple- so the fact that they're interesting ...


3

There are no camera settings that will create pixel intensities that correspond linearly to the number of photons. The conversion from raw camera sensor data to an image is non-linear. To get something proportional to photons, you will need to access the raw file directly. This is non-trivial, the file format is complicated, and some of the processing steps ...


2

Yes, there is a way. The distance indicator is also shown when you are in the focus magnifier mode, which zooms the picture to help you achieve focus. The camera exits the mode per default after 2 seconds. And touching the focus ring will show it again. You can however, set the time you stay in this mode to forever. Option page 1, 13/14, Focus Magnif. ...


2

The values you quote are Nominal values, approximate values not necessarily actually existing, historically stated by humans to be sort of nice rounded numbers. As such, the nominal values are somewhat arbitrary, but convention over 100 years has standardized them to be your list. But the cameras actually use more precise goal values, powers of 2. Shutter ...


2

The error E:62:10 is "lens error". Most likely the lens has lost its alignment with the sensor, maybe because it is bent or twisted a tiny bit out of shape. This can cause the lines you see, as the camera is trying to compensate for an expected image from the lens, but the actual image is skewed.


2

To properly answer your question, I think a course in light metering and exposure would be necessary, but this is beyond the scope of this forum. I will try to keep it short. Your question is by no means confined to the boundaries of Polaroid cameras. As a matter of fact, the answer to this question applies to photography in general, be it film or digital. ...


2

The techniques for various types of astrophotography are different so there is no single answer. E.g.: Planetary Imaging typically involves a telescope with a long focal length and a very fast camera that captures video frames at a high rate. Guiding is not needed. The data is captured within a few minutes. Processing this data is also very different. ...


2

I could finally verify that the problem was 100% caused by the lens. It was internally unstable and in certain position the internal connections were not communicating the right values to the camera body (or they were completely isolated). This problem seems at first random happening, then after more shootings it got worse and in the end the lens got stuck ...


2

It looks like you've probably got 'Safety Shift' enabled and set to option 1: 'Shutter speed/Aperture' in your 70D's menu. It's found under the "Custom Functions" menu at 'Menu → Custom Functions (Orange Tab) → C.Fn I: Exposure → C.Fn I -6 Safety Shift'. It also looks like you're using a manual flash triggering method that the camera does not detect. Thus ...


2

Assuming the lens you are using fully communicates with your Nikon D5600, that information is already attached in the metadata to all of your image files when you transfer them from your camera to your computer. There are at least a couple of remote possibilities that would leave you without this information: You are using an older Nikon or adapted lens ...


2

Yes, and you can even do schlieren photography using old and poor mobile phone camera. It's not rocket science, yet it requires some equipment not normally found in a typical houshold (or even professional photographic studio), unless you are the amateur astronomer. The key ingredient is spherical mirror, which can be obtained from a cheap newtonian ...


2

View this Leica blog and look at his negatives. He used a lot of TriX 400. The idea is exposing for the right things. He exposes so that the shadows are all dark. You can certainly bring the highlights up in post processing, but look for high contrast light - noon light and shadows. https://www.leica-camera.blog/2015/08/12/renato-dagostin-coast-to-coast-...


2

Another option is to shoot through colored filters. Back in my "I'm going to be a real photographer!" phase (before I realized I had absolutely no talent for it), I shot a lot of B&W through various filters to enhance or reduce contrast. Red filters darken blues (making white clouds stand out against a blue sky), green filters darken oranges (bringing ...


2

Based on your report that the camera had recently been returned to you after a clean and check along with your discovery that the aperture was set to f/25, here's what most likely happened: Your cleaning technician probably manually set the aperture to f/25 when checking for dust spots on your camera's sensor. It's easier to see the effect of dust in front ...


2

I tried some manual settings bit the pics look washed out, like the sky is white but then I can see the ground in color instead of black. I'm missing the right balance of settings. The dynamic range of the scenery exceeds what your camera can capture. Using manual settings will only allow you to find a compromise between sky and foreground, but will not ...


1

This is not a difinitive answer to your question but may be a starting point for investigation. I copied your images to my computer and easily adjusted them to look more correctly exposed so the correct data should be already there. (My apologies if this seems a bit obvious or if you have already tried it but your description gives the impression that you ...


1

You mentioned there's an exif data incoherence with the parameters you shot. Although this could be an error of internal parts of the lens (dirt or moisture in the metal tracks of the barrel, whatever...) It won't affect exposure and colours or white balance. I've tried right now inhibiting the connectors and shooting manual. What I don't know very well is ...


1

How repeatable is it? A few ideas: I've managed to significantly change light levels by standing between the light source and the subject :-) Are these always-on studio strobes or are they Speedlites that might have dropped into sleep mode? Are they Speedlites that might have dropped into sleep mode then awakened reset to default settings? Are your ...


1

When in the "Creative Zone" exposure modes (P, Tv, Av, M), you can select the ISO speed setting using the "ISO" button on top of the camera or by going to 'Menu → Shooting (red) Tab 2 → ISO Speed'. When in the "Creative Zone" exposure modes (P, Tv, Av, M), you can select the maximum ISO speed limit by going to 'Menu → Shooting (red tab) 2 → ISO Auto', ...


1

The change when you zoom in is just a moiré effect between the lines in your picture and the pixels of your screen (and the scaling which is applied by your image viewer). The question is why you have these "scan lines". My hypothesis that your sensor (or some electronics downstream) is failing, so every other line is slightly darker than it should. The ...


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