31

If you read the other answers, it should be apparent that the qualities you seek such as (a) better portraits and (b) the desire to have a blurred background ... aren't really one thing, but a combination of many factors. There are some nuances but the short answer is ... portraits do not require advanced DSLRs (so entry level is fine) but... there are ...


11

Who makes the bottom of the pecking order when it comes to durability? Canon and Nikon probably do. I can't imagine anyone making a DSLR or mirrorless more "disposable" than the newly introduced Canon 4000D (not even offered in the U.S.). It also has the lowest MSRP of just about any interchangeable lens camera on the planet with an APS-C size sensor. But ...


11

It's not the camera, it's the lens. If you want a cheap and good option for shooting portrait pictures, you should definitely purchase in addition to a DSLR, a 50mm f/1.8 "nifty fifty" lens. Do expect to spend $100-$200 for the lens. 50mm is about optimal for portraits, because the relatively long 50mm focal length on crop sensor cameras is long enough to ...


7

Is an entry level DSLR going to shoot nice portrait pictures? By itself, no, absolutely not. It's easy to make the joke that the camera by itself just sits there and doesn't take pictures at all, being an inanimate object and all. Of course, we know what you actually mean, but there's really some truth to that. A DSLR is by nature a flexible tool, and that ...


4

Yes, low-end DSLRs can get you nice photos. But it depends a lot on the photographer, not just the camera. The main thing to keep in mind for blurry backgrounds is the ratio between two distances: camera to the point of focus; and camera to background. The further the background relative to the subject, the blurrier the background. Also, the bigger the ...


4

In terms of results that replicate these particular images, you are unlikely to see any significant difference. You may be able to identify some plusses and minuses, but basically it'll be in the same ballpark. However, there is a significant difference: the camera you identify has a 50× optical zoom, while the Galaxy Note 8 uses compute power to blend ...


4

I had an entry level for years (Canon 550D) and I have taken really good shots on it. Although lenses are important, I would like to enumerate a few other factors (sorted from the most important to the less important) that will influence on your results The subject: This is by far the most important of all. Your cellphone can make a much better picture than ...


3

I want a clear improvement using the only the eyes as measurement. Not looking for zoom, just for a more clear image, lesser blur, fine details in distance to look better. Let's break this down... Clear Image - a clear landscape image is due just as much to light and atmospheric quality as it is to sensor and lens choice - perhaps even more so. The iconic ...


3

Any list here is likely to be subjective and anecdotal - the costs of an objective experiment (failures recorded on a representative sample of production for every major manufacturer over a period of years) are going to be prohibitive, possibly inconclusive, and likely to be out of date the moment they're completed. You may be able to find Mean Time Between ...


3

Here's a different opinion: forget about the technical capabilities, optimize for carry convenience. For someone just starting out, the most important thing is practice. Get a camera that you can always have with you so you get lots of practice with it. A quote I like by one of the photography masters: It is an illusion that photos are made with the ...


2

The M100 looks like a good camera the picture quality should be excelent and I would not worry about low light performance, the lenses will have a greater inpact here. According to me the main dissadvantages of the M100 is the lack of a flash hotshoe and a viewfinder. No hotshoe means not being able to attach an external flash on top of the camera and ...


1

To publish a book, you'll want to look at the size you want to print the image in the book in inches, and multiply that size by 300px, which will provide the minimum resolution of the camera you will need. You're also looking at relatively low light images, so you'll need a larger sensor and remote control of the settings, so a DSLR is probably the only ...


1

Superzoom cameras like the Canon model you mention are specialized to give medium quality at a very wide range of zoom settings. At 24mm equivalent (which is what most phone cameras are), they might actually be worse (smartphone lenses tend to be relatively sophisticated prime lenses, albeit tiny ones, optimized for exactly one focal length. They will beat a ...


1

If you don't mind a slightly bigger camera than the one you are considering, get a refurbished Canon T6 I have five of their predecessor (T5) for my photography students and they are great. Having the flexibility of a DSLR is much better than the "advanced" style camera you are thinking about. There are many advantages... two that come to mind are the ...


1

The EOS M100 main advantage is that the mirrorless design means it is very compact and small. Other than the light weight small size you will not improve your photos compared to getting a regular DSLR which you could probably pick up for less. The other issue is accessories - there are a limited range of lens and accessories. You can use regular Canon ...


1

I'm not a mirrorless shooter, so take my opinion with a grain of salt... I would go with a Refurbished Canon Rebel T6 Kit. (Which is a DSLR, not a mirrorless camera) I have purchased 5 copies of the previous model in this series (the T5) for my photography students, and they are great. It performs well at high ISOs (which is what you need for low light ...


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