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Things to consider when thinking of purchasing your first dSLR. 1. Can I afford a dSLR? If you've never used an interchangeable lens camera system before, realize that the cost is astronomical in comparison with fixed-lens cameras, because the camera body itself is just the start of your purchases and the basis of your system. It is also (weirdly) the most ...


32

If you read the other answers, it should be apparent that the qualities you seek such as (a) better portraits and (b) the desire to have a blurred background ... aren't really one thing, but a combination of many factors. There are some nuances but the short answer is ... portraits do not require advanced DSLRs (so entry level is fine) but... there are ...


25

You're right. Picture quality is as complex as, say, how well a food item tastes. Megapixels only tell you the number of pixels the picture is made up of, and more is certainly not always better. More pixels on a small sensor means more noise. Megapixels are often used by marketing just because people want simple truths, like 18 MP must be better than 10. ...


23

Essentials I think that all three of the camera types (dSLR, mirrorless, and fixed-lens compact) can be used to seriously learn photography if all you've been using up to now is a phone camera. However, I think that there are three features any camera you choose has to have if you really want to learn photography deeply, and those three features will rule ...


20

In general you will find a great deal of distaste for bridge cameras here and on most photography forums. In a few unique circumstances they can be good options (very inexpensive super zoom) but for most people they aren't recommended. Sensor size is a big deal Why not get a bridge camera? Since they were introduced and became somewhat popular, the market ...


15

GEEKY ANSWER - you have been warned. There's much more to the image quality than just lens and megapixels. The most important factor in any photograph is: Light You can have the best camera and lens in the universe - and that will still be meaningless if you have no light, or very badly lit subject. After that comes... lens. Lens is what bends the light,...


13

I would caution AGAINST a Nikon D7000. I love mine. Love it. It's awesome. It's also more camera than a lot of people will really want or need. The D3000 was a lot cheaper, let me get better lenses as I figured out what to do with them, and had nice little tutorials built in. Perfect for a beginning photographer. As a middle case, take the D5100. An ex-...


13

I'll offer a slightly different take: Your current camera is dated, but not really bad. The problems you're having with it, judging by the pictures, are: excessive post processing brightening, which increases noise colour saturation contrast camera shake sensor dirt (visible in the sky on the beach picture) In fact, technically, i like your last picture,...


12

A mirrorless is a system camera and you must therefore carefully consider the system. There 2 major differenciators between systems: Sensor-size: This affects image quality and particularly low-light performance. Four-Thirds and APS-C are popular sizes but there are full-frame options and smaller 1" or 1/1.7" ones too which have noticeably lower image-...


11

Who makes the bottom of the pecking order when it comes to durability? Canon and Nikon probably do. I can't imagine anyone making a DSLR or mirrorless more "disposable" than the newly introduced Canon 4000D (not even offered in the U.S.). It also has the lowest MSRP of just about any interchangeable lens camera on the planet with an APS-C size sensor. But ...


11

It's not the camera, it's the lens. If you want a cheap and good option for shooting portrait pictures, you should definitely purchase in addition to a DSLR, a 50mm f/1.8 "nifty fifty" lens. Do expect to spend $100-$200 for the lens. 50mm is about optimal for portraits, because the relatively long 50mm focal length on crop sensor cameras is long enough to ...


10

No Canon dSLR has built in image stabilization. Canon offers it in select lenses, known as 'IS' lenses. So, no, neither offer image stabilization. All Canon cameras also offer noise reduction, and of course, it can be applied (or not in the case of RAW) on the computer after the fact as well. Does it matter? Noise reduction matters, because all cameras ...


10

If money's no object then the 5D mkIII is the better camera in almost all areas (viewfinder, resolution, autofocus, shooting speed, card slots, sync speed, weather sealing, video). Canon make a GP-E2 GPS logger and WFT-E7 wifi grip for the 5D mkIII if you need this functionality. Reasons to go with the 6D would be mostly due to weight (of both the camera ...


9

First, ALL modern DSLRs are good. There are levels of good but they are all good. Any one will do but there are some differences. Higher end cameras like the Nikon D7000 and Canon 7D you mention and Pentax K-5 family are more efficient to use because they offer more external controls. They let you work faster which is more important when you actually have ...


9

Even keeping the same sensor size and lens parameters you will always save space by fixing the lens. You remove the need for a lens mount interface, lens barrels can be smaller as they gain stiffness from being fixed, you can put some of the lens mechanisms (zoom and focus motors) into the camera body, use leaf shutters instead of focal plane (Sony RX1). So ...


9

TL;DR: There is no risk in buying older generation Canon body. Canon is known for the consistency of lens mounts and compatibility. They have 3 mounts for photography right now, 2+1 actually. Oldest EF mount for fullframe. Younger EF-S mount for crops. Youngest EF-M mount for mirrorless. EF lenses can be used on EF-S bodies directly, not vice versa! Other ...


8

Absolutely, there are good reasons to choose a compact camera, just like there are good reasons to choose a mirrorless. The key when looking at anything is deciding which reasons are important to you. Size: A compact camera is, well, compact. A mirrorless camera's body may be compact but once you add a lens, it will often be double the thickness of a ...


8

Both the Canon 60D and the 700D/T5i are built around the same basic sensor: Canon's 18MP APS-C sensor with 4.3┬Ám pixel pitch. It has also appeared in the T2i/550D, T3i/600D, T4i/650D,SL1/100D, EOS M, and 7D. When shooting RAW and editing on a computer any of these cameras can use the latest updates to Canon's demosaicing algorithms and image processing that ...


8

It sounds like you are describing mirrorless system cameras. They have the interchangeable lenses and some of them have larger sensors, but they always use the sensor directly to an LCD or OLED display rather than using a viewfinder (or in rare case, use a viewfinder that doesn't go through the lens), which saves on size and weight (while giving up a few ...


8

DoF scales on lenses is pretty much of thing of the past (see: Why did manufacturers stop including DOF scales on lenses?), mostly due to the fact that zoom lenses and autofocus are ubiquitous and commonly used. A DoF scale changes with focal length, and autofocus has made the focus "throw" of a lens much much smaller than in manual focus days, so using a ...


8

I don't have camera, I do it with my phone all the time :( There it is: a free camera. You already own your phone, continuing to use it is free. What's the matter using that? Or at least you could give me some advice about cheap cameras out there which I could buy? Just buy a used camera. There's a huge market. Mostly everybody has a limited budget (...


7

So, I recently bought a used camera. To decide which to buy, I developed this technique: Make a list of all features that are important to you. Assign a point value from 1-10 to each feature. Give a 10 to something essential, a 1 to something that barely matters. Write down the stat for the feature for all of the cameras that you are interested in. Give no ...


7

The QX10 and QX100 aren't actually lenses for your phone, they are a miniature point and shoot camera that uses your phone for control and display of the images. (Think of it kind of like a remote controlled digital camera with no screen.) It has its own sensor and is basically the same as buying a point and shoot that copies the photos to your phone. ...


7

Usual Basics Just as with dSLRs, you will want to consider the following "main" features of a camera system in addition to any gee-whiz features you find sexy: Sensor size and resolution (affects noise performance, and lens size/speed--the larger the sensor, the bigger/slower the lenses are liable to be to keep the system compact). Overall system breadth (...


7

Here are the advantages of the 50X zoom compact camera: ZOOM Here are the advantages of a DSLR: Larger sensor = Better low light performance Larger sensor = Longer exposure times without unacceptable noise from the sensor heating up Larger sensor = more background blur when desired Interchangeable lenses = better lens quality at the only focal length you'...


7

Is an entry level DSLR going to shoot nice portrait pictures? By itself, no, absolutely not. It's easy to make the joke that the camera by itself just sits there and doesn't take pictures at all, being an inanimate object and all. Of course, we know what you actually mean, but there's really some truth to that. A DSLR is by nature a flexible tool, and that ...


6

If the choice is based over which camera allows me to produce better photos, I'd choose the 5D mark III over the 70D hands down and never look back. I regularly use both a Canon 7D and a Canon 5D mark II. When I am shooting with only one body it is almost always the Full Frame 5DII. To my eyes there is a visible difference between images made with each body,...


6

First, it's unclear to me what you consider to be "good colors". The quality of color reproduction is a complex chain of dependencies, such as white balance, filters, iso value (color noise), lens, color space, image format, monitor and printer quality, etc. Second, most photography review sites (of which dpreview is my personal first choice) have a ...


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