36

You could replace the full set of controls with some much more intuitive and integrated click-wheel or touch-screen controls. Most DSLR's use wheels and buttons to set the most-used parameters (shutter speed, aperture, ISO, focus, AE-lock, etc.). Some have touch screens in addition or instead. However, most photographers want tactile controls so that they ...


28

On page 1 of theNikon D3300 reference manual the [+/-] button pictured to the lower left in the image included in the question is listed as the: When shooting in manual exposure mode with Nikon cameras that have only a single control wheel, such as your D3300, the wheel - which is labeled the 'command dial' in your user's manual - controls the shutter speed ...


19

I highly recommend you read Neal Stephenson's essay In the Beginning Was the Command Line. It's a decade and a half old now, and about computers rather than cameras, but a lot of it is very relevant. Particularly: Obviously you cannot sell a complicated technological system to people without some sort of interface that enables them to use it. The internal ...


15

Three things: Film is relatively lenient, and exposure variations are handled in the printing. The lens has a relatively small fixed aperture and focus is set at a reasonable distance to get a lot of depth of field. Finally, prints from these things are usually 4×6, and not subjected to a high degree of scrutiny — we basically expect them to be relatively ...


15

I don't know what specific model rotary wheel Nikon used in that camera, but moving it fast shouldn't cause any excessive wear. These rotary wheels are usually just rather simple mechanical switches. There are usually two separate switches. Each goes thru one complete cycle each detent, but the two are off from each other by 1/4 cycle. The fancy name for ...


11

Why is the Depth of Field Preview button necessary? With the lens wide open, as it normally is before you take the shot, you can't tell how much depth of field you'll get in the photograph. When you press the button, the lens is stopped down to the selected aperture letting you see the shot as it will be recorded, depth of field and all. For both digital ...


11

It's the number of shots remaining (hence the "r") that you can take and store on your card. When you half-press the shutter button, the number changes to the number of shots remaining in your memory buffer (pictures stored in memory that haven't been written to the storage card yet). This lets you know how many more shots you can take in "CH" (continuous ...


10

According to the online manual, the B on the mode dial will set it to Bulb mode. Have a look at page 24 in this document.


9

Scene modes are particularly important on small cameras. In fact high end DSLRs do not have any scene modes because they give complete control over the camera. Scene modes basically abstract the underlying controls which are not reachable on a camera like the one you show. Notice there is no M, A, S or P mode on the camera, so you have no control on any of ...


8

Those controls are made for rapid adjustment. You shouldn't have a problem with using them as quickly as you can accurately make adjustments. I can't guarantee your knob won't eventually fail, but the speed at which you turn it (within practical limits) shouldn't cause any problems for it. Even relatively cheap dials don't have problems with this and ...


8

Could someone please tell me what it does, or at least what it's called, so I can look it up? Scottbb's answer is correct and you should accept it, but I wanted to follow up with a little more information about how to find the answer in case you have others like it. There's a diagram on page 6 of the Nikon D5500 user manual (PDF) that describes the ...


5

Correct, Nikon's low-end DSLRs have no top LCD and only a single command dial. Modern LCDs and interfaces really don't offer anything to make those features less important; it's simply a cost-cutting move. It might be worth noting that the D70 was not a low-end DSLR; the model progression in that line is D70, D70s, D80, D90, D7000, D7100.


5

why a lens's aperture only shuts to its specified stop when the shutter release is pressed, instead of staying static at that stop constantly That's because a closed aperture would reduce the amount of light coming to your eye. The viewfinder would be dim. Try the preview button on a lens with a wide open aperture like f1.4 and an aperture setting of f22 ...


5

There's a third option (although a little bit of a hack), most Pentaxes (including the K-50) allow you to specify which options are retained when the camera is turned off (under "Memory" in the capture settings menu). Set the RAW/Fx button to enable bracketing. Then ensure "drive mode" is disabled in the memory settings. Disabling bracketing can be ...


5

Scene modes as they are typically referred to are very useful in basic compact cameras. They allow the user to hint to the camera what type of image settings to use. For example a common scene mode is macro mode, typically selected with a flower icon. A macro scene mode can limit the camera to a focusing distance of something like 2-10cm for example, ...


4

Hoping I haven't misunderstood your question, it is as simple as this: Turn Dial on top left of Camera to “M” Press the “Q” button on the back of the camera Set ISO to auto Alternatively Turn Dial on top left of Camera to "M" Press the ISO Button on top of Camera and turn the top dial to the left until you reach "A" now you are free to set the aperture ...


4

Yes, the D600 does have a lockable mode wheel. On the upper left of the D600's body (when the camera is viewed from behind) you'll find a D7000-style exposure mode dial and around its base, another dial for shooting modes. Both dials are lockable, which prevents accidental operation. From the DPReview review. The D600 and D610 are the only full frame ...


4

D7000 Manual (p99) clearly states that having the lens on "M" while having the body on "AF" can cause damage to the camera. It does not say in what order the switches should be set so the safest procedure might be to turn the camera to the "off" position while setting the two switches.


4

One thing that hasn't been pointed out here is the difference between 'incident light' (the light falling on the subject) and 'reflected light' (the light bouncing off the subject). Your camera can only measure reflected light, which means it will depend on the colour and shade of the subject, whereas incident light is always consistent given a consistent ...


4

Aperture Priority is an Automatic mode. In all Auto Modes the camera will automatically set what it thinks is the correct exposure. Changing the Aperture, Shutter or ISO or will not change the exposure if any one of them are in "A" or "Auto". If you want additional control, you must use the Exposure Compensation dial to lighten or darken the photo.


4

I'm guessing you moved to the Nikon D7100 from a lower tier model Nikon camera that only has one control wheel. With such a camera you must hold down the +/- button while moving the only control wheel in order to change the aperture in Manual exposure mode. Moving the control wheel alone changes the shutter speed. The aperture setting is controlled a little ...


4

It's highly doubtful such a grip exists. Nikon did not design the D3200 to accommodate a grip. Nikon doesn't offer a grip for the D3200 and other D3xx0 series cameras. There are no additional contacts in the D3200 battery well to allow communication between controls on a grip and the camera. Most DSLRs that may be used with a manufacturer's battery grip ...


4

Just press/long-press the Ok button: When in menu mode, simply press to switch to focus point selection When in focus point selection, long-press to switch back to menu mode When in focus point selection, press to reset the selection point to the middle one. There is even a small icon on the button itself, under the Ok label, but it's not as clear as they ...


4

What is that camera? The camera you've pictured appears to be a Nikon D750. How many cameras these days have it especially Nikon D5300? Well, pretty much all digital SLR cameras have full color screens so that they can display image previews. How much color they use in their menu and control screens is a bit more variable. This YouTube video about the ...


3

Almost all SLRs for the last several decades do metering and allow focusing, either manual or phase detection AF, with the lens at its widest aperture setting. This allows focusing to be more accurate and the viewfinder to be as bright as possible. But this also means the DoF when viewing the scene through the viewfinder is not an accurate indication of the ...


3

There are a few digital cameras that have this, though "mainstream" cameras don't seem to. For example there is the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7 and Leica Digilux 2. A quick search on dpreview with the keyword 'aperture ring' will bring up the handful of cameras that have this.


3

Generally you should use a remote shutter release to hold the shutter open for a prolonged period. This also prevents camera-shake that is usually associated with touching the camera while taking a long exposure. Several options are available from simple lockable switches to complex intervalometers. Each have their own advantages but to get started a cheap ...


3

Maybe a stupid question, but are you in manual mode? Have you tried resetting all settings to their original value? This is how you do it (From the Nikon website): Resetting the D3100 The D3200 and D3100 do not have a 2 button reset option. To perform a reset you need to manually choose the reset option in the Shooting Menu and the Setup menu. To do this ...


3

This is a feature of the lens, not necessarily the camera. For Nikon/Nikkor lenses all G-type lenses are missing the aperture ring on the lens. Unfortunately for you, this is almost all lenses these days. You can use old lenses, however. Make sure that you get a camera body with in-built focus-motor, otherwise you won't have focus on the old lenses.


3

Short answer: Assuming you're shooting in aperture priority mode, fiddling with the shutter speed or ISO actually won't change much. The exposure is automatically calculated by the camera for you and it tries to estimate what shutter speed + ISO will give you a correctly exposed photo. Assuming you're not happy with what you see after you take a photo using ...


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