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36

You could replace the full set of controls with some much more intuitive and integrated click-wheel or touch-screen controls. Most DSLR's use wheels and buttons to set the most-used parameters (shutter speed, aperture, ISO, focus, AE-lock, etc.). Some have touch screens in addition or instead. However, most photographers want tactile controls so that they ...


28

On page 1 of theNikon D3300 reference manual the [+/-] button pictured to the lower left in the image included in the question is listed as the: When shooting in manual exposure mode with Nikon cameras that have only a single control wheel, such as your D3300, the wheel - which is labeled the 'command dial' in your user's manual - controls the shutter speed ...


21

This is normally referred to as something like "dual control dials", and you're right, it's a very desirable feature. Very few entry-level cameras have this, but it's common on mid-tier "prosumer" DSLRs, and universal on higher-end models. You can find a list of models with this feature on a camera review / database site like Neocamera; try this search: ...


19

I highly recommend you read Neal Stephenson's essay In the Beginning Was the Command Line. It's a decade and a half old now, and about computers rather than cameras, but a lot of it is very relevant. Particularly: Obviously you cannot sell a complicated technological system to people without some sort of interface that enables them to use it. The internal ...


17

AF-S is AF 'single'- your camera will focus on a fixed object when you press the AF button and will remain focused on that point for as long as you hold the button down. This is best for static subjects. AF-C is AF 'continuous' - the camera will focus on whatever is in the relevant AF points (depending on how you have your AF coverage set up) and will ...


16

The easiest way to do this is using a smart collection. You can use the Has Adjustments filter to show just edited photos, or the Edit Date filter to choose photos edited within a specific time period. I have a smart collection called "Edited this week" which is great for easily getting back to the photos I've recently worked on.


15

For changing the shutter speed, put the mode dial on Tv (as in the image below: make sure the white line corresponds to the letters Tv ), and turn the wheel high-lighted in red below (excuse my crappy images, I edited all this as something quick and dirty). On your LCD screen, you can see the below screen (let me know if you don't know how to get to this ...


15

I don't know what specific model rotary wheel Nikon used in that camera, but moving it fast shouldn't cause any excessive wear. These rotary wheels are usually just rather simple mechanical switches. There are usually two separate switches. Each goes thru one complete cycle each detent, but the two are off from each other by 1/4 cycle. The fancy name for ...


15

Three things: Film is relatively lenient, and exposure variations are handled in the printing. The lens has a relatively small fixed aperture and focus is set at a reasonable distance to get a lot of depth of field. Finally, prints from these things are usually 4×6, and not subjected to a high degree of scrutiny — we basically expect them to be relatively ...


12

I use a program mode the majority of the time that I am not in a studio. An example of that would be aperture priority mode - where I get to set the aperture and ISO that stays consistent, and my camera is allowed to determine the shutter speed to keep the exposure proper. Full Auto mode, which many entry level DSLR cameras have, is great if you hand your ...


11

Why is the Depth of Field Preview button necessary? With the lens wide open, as it normally is before you take the shot, you can't tell how much depth of field you'll get in the photograph. When you press the button, the lens is stopped down to the selected aperture letting you see the shot as it will be recorded, depth of field and all. For both digital ...


11

It's the number of shots remaining (hence the "r") that you can take and store on your card. When you half-press the shutter button, the number changes to the number of shots remaining in your memory buffer (pictures stored in memory that haven't been written to the storage card yet). This lets you know how many more shots you can take in "CH" (continuous ...


10

According to the online manual, the B on the mode dial will set it to Bulb mode. Have a look at page 24 in this document.


9

The zoom-in and zoom-out buttons activate the manual-focus assist function. This lets you see pixels closer so that you can see better when focusing. This only applies because you are using Live-View which should be the exception when using a DSLR. In normal operation, through the viewfinder, these buttons will not do anything.


9

Scene modes are particularly important on small cameras. In fact high end DSLRs do not have any scene modes because they give complete control over the camera. Scene modes basically abstract the underlying controls which are not reachable on a camera like the one you show. Notice there is no M, A, S or P mode on the camera, so you have no control on any of ...


8

Those controls are made for rapid adjustment. You shouldn't have a problem with using them as quickly as you can accurately make adjustments. I can't guarantee your knob won't eventually fail, but the speed at which you turn it (within practical limits) shouldn't cause any problems for it. Even relatively cheap dials don't have problems with this and ...


8

Could someone please tell me what it does, or at least what it's called, so I can look it up? Scottbb's answer is correct and you should accept it, but I wanted to follow up with a little more information about how to find the answer in case you have others like it. There's a diagram on page 6 of the Nikon D5500 user manual (PDF) that describes the ...


7

I'd suggest avoiding a full-auto most of the time, and instead, choose a mode based on what you're shooting -- for creative shooting, aperture priority modes (labelled as Av on some cameras) is great at controlling the depth of field without worrying about exposure too much. For sport, and other fast action, jump to shutter priority ( labelled as Tv on some ...


7

Why don't you set the mode to be manual focus and put a colored tape over the AF/MF button while you are using it and so when you return the lens, the tape will be an in your face reminder to change it back to Auto Focus mode.


7

I believe this is one of the modes you enable by pressing the INFO button. If you repeatedly press INFO to cycle through all the display modes you will eventually arrive back to the default mode which turns the LCD off.


7

Which of the statements is generally more correct? I believe the first one is correct which is Use all available modes the camera has to offer as I learn more about photography. I'll explain how: Most entry DSLR cameras have the following modes: Full Auto Mode: use this mode if you just want to get the shot, perhaps you saw something that will go a ...


7

It's because of your shooting mode. You will need to be in P, Tv, Av, M or A-DEP modes. Source: http://learn.usa.canon.com/app/pdfs/quickguides/CDLC_EOS-Integrated-Speedlite-Transmitter_QuickGuide.pdf


7

I'm not sure it affects the shutter lag, if that's what you mean by reaction time, but it will likely affect the efficiency of the VR system. If you want to use back button focus, you still need to half press the shutter button to activate the VR a couple of seconds or so before fully pressing the shutter button to take the picture. Otherwise the gyros won't ...


6

I hate to say this, but first make sure you're pressing the right button, as I always press the wrong one. There are two similar buttons. One is the function button near the top of the lens, and the DOF preview button is almost under the lens. If you press the DOF button, even with the aperture wide open, it will make a very clunky sound, like when you ...


6

To me this sounds like the Mirror Lockup custom function setting. When using a tripod this is useful as it first locks up the mirror to avoid the shake from that as the picture is taken, allowing the camera to be as still as physically possible when the second click opens the shutter (assuming you use a cable release). This can be turned off in the menu ...


6

I haven't used that actual camera but usually the meter readout is shown through the view finder. On cameras I have used its shown as a graduated scale at the bottom of the viewfinder with a pointer showing how far the current exposure is away from where the camera thinks the exposure should be. The scale will be 0 at the centre +1 (overexposed) on the right ...


6

Only way I could think of is MagicLantern. I installed it on my 1100D yesterday night and I instantly wanted to disable that feature.


6

If you want to manually focus, best to set them both to M it tells the body not to try to AF, and also will allow you to take an image even if focus isn't perfect it tells the lens that you are manually focusing, so will allow the focus ring to turn freely pressing the shutter release will not attempt to focus the lens in any way If you want to use AF, set ...


6

To zoom with those lenses on your D5200, you must physically move the zoom ring on the lenses. When you push buttons on the back of the camera to zoom in on a particular spot on the screen, you are just magnifying one area of the total image so you can see it better. You are not making any change in the lens' focal length. The camera will record the entire ...


5

It seems you pushed the lever that switches from the OVF to the EVF for more than 2 seconds. Doing so will bring the magnification glass on top of the OVF. Try pushing it again for more than 2 seconds to put it back in the other position. That magnification glass is useful for the other lenses...


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