46

Because there is a lot happening in a short timeframe (movement phases of a fast animal or athlete), and you want to photograph it all and/or the exact timing of the relevant event cannot be predicted, so covering as many possible times where that event could happen (and discarding the rest later) is necessary and/or redundant pictures are needed ...


37

Strictly speaking, one does not need high FPS burst modes for sports or wildlife, but rather they are useful tools that open up more options. I've shot sports in the last few years with a Canon 7D, typically using 5-8 frame bursts (at I think 8fps) at a time, and I've also used a medium format manual focus camera. Both methods have produced great images, ...


20

There's only one distance that is in sharpest focus. Everything in front of or behind that distance is blurry. The further we move away from the focus distance, the blurrier things get. The questions become: "How blurry is it? Is that within our acceptable limit? How far from the focus distance do things become unacceptably blurry?" What we call depth of ...


15

In addition to all the correct answers about how fast action occurs, I'd like to point out two fundamental biological reasons for why you need burst: 100ms. This is the fastest we can react to a stimulus. Olympic sprinters start to contract their muscles 100ms after the starter's gun goes off. Any event which occurs faster than this cannot be captured by ...


7

Imagine a wall some distance from your camera ­— a flat wall with no depth, and you're facing it straight on. Lens focus is like that: everything in that exact plane is in focus. (This is a simplification. For real-world lenses this isn't perfectly flat. In reality, a number of unavoidable optical aberrations keep perfection at bay, but for a basic ...


7

Visible color of an object looks like something objective — if it looks yellow then it looks yellow, why change it in the first place? I just don't see how this color alteration is useful. This is the fundamental misunderstanding. Visible color is not objective at all. That sounds surprising if you haven't really stopped to consider or investigate, but it ...


4

It's the effect of changing the white balance that you are seeing in the color shift of the different modes. The camera has to guess the white point of the image in order to render the JPG in automatic mode. In the Landscape mode it is guessing you are outside under natural light. In Sunset mode it guesses the light is yellow at sunset and renders the colors ...


4

For a specific case where a high FPS is useful, consider cricket photography (the game, not the insect). When a batter takes a swing at the ball, there are potentially a number of outcomes worth taking a photo of: He hits the ball The ball hits the stumps and sends the bails flying The optimal time to take the photo is slightly different depending on the ...


3

I've been shooting at Motorsport for a while now and I can give you my vision of why this is like this I believe in any sport. Usually sports action occurs so fast that any image can change in a fraction of a second. Take again the image of the Motorsport races. Sometimes a car hits another one and they go off track. One image of that is okay. But you ...


2

They don’t know WHEN the moment they want will happen. WHEN will the birds wings be FULLY extended? WHEN will the ball be ON the racket/bat? Answer sometime in the next second. If you have 4fps that 4 tries 11 fps 20 fps are more shots. You have more images to find which is closest to that KEY moment. High jumper toe JUST leaving the ground Its not ...


2

Your basic assumption: "If all colors are combinations of red, green and blue" is just wrong. Rafael says it works on humans, but this is also wrong. Let me answer this: "What colors are we NOT seeing and why?" Take the light coming from a low-pressure sodium lamp ("SOX"). It is made of two wavelengths at 589 nm and 589.6 nm, both have the same "amber" ...


2

I'm somewhat surprised that nobody has said exactly what aspects of the image are produced by the lens and what aspects of the image are produced by the camera. Lens determines (I'm assuming autofocus, not manual focus, here): Field of view / image circle Depth of field for a given circle of confusion (fix the CoC, get the DoF) Background blur in length ...


2

Is it lenses which make your photographs, not camera bodies? No. Photographers make photographs using camera bodies and film or camera bodies with digital sensors. Sometimes, photographers also use lenses and other equipment. Is it a myth or a fact that mostly it is the lenses which make your photographs not the camera bodies? It is a myth. Photographs ...


2

Geometric optics teach us to expresses that a lens is only able to form a sharp image of an object at a given focus point. Objects nearer or further as to distance will image as unsharp. However, as a matter of common observation, objects before and behind the distance focused on likely appear sharply focused. The reason is, there exists a span before and ...


2

Experimentally: Take a picture of a sheet of ruled/squared paper. Open the photo in an image viewed/editor Measure the distance in pixels between two lines Divide the physical distance (in mm/inches...) between two rules by half that value. This will give you an estimate of the smallest thing you can see in a picture, if the lens is good enough for the ...


2

All Lumix G series lenses are for the Micro Four Thirds system. From the listing for the LUMIX G 42.5mm F1.7 ASPH (H-HS043) at Panasonic's website:


1

The job of the lens is to create an image of the outside by projecting it on the surface of film or digital image sensor. To accomplish, light from objects traverse the transparent lens. The shape (figure) of the lens and the density of the lens material cause these image forming rays to alter their direction of travel. We can draw a trace of these emerging ...


1

Google it, it appears to be for micro 4/3: https://www.panasonic.com/ca/consumer/cameras-camcorders/interchangeable-lenses/micro-four-thirds/h-hs043.html


1

No. You can't know this from the technical specs you are thinking of. The resolving power of a camera system depends on the way the lens is built and the properties of the recording medium — and other factors such as lighting and atmosphere. You may be able to get some details of the recording medium — the sensor — from camera specs, but not enough to be ...


1

Most of the other answers are perfectly valid. Another aspect to be considered is that -each- of the frames can be sold individually and exclusively to different buyers. You are selling the image, not the event.


1

Question: Why exactly do action photographers "need" high fps burst cameras? Answer: In order to shoot as many photos as possible in a given amount of time and/or to reduce the time between shutter actuation's. Sometimes in fast action sports or high speed animals the moment you want to capture happens at the same moment the camera is resetting the ...


1

It's clearly the lens. Lenses have a lot more impact on image quality than the body. This is shot from a tripod, 42 inch soft boxes on both sides, at f/8, 1/125 s, ISO 400. I tried a mediocre Tamron 28-300 f/3.5-5.6 lens on both a Canon 450D (Rebel XSi) and a Canon 5D Mark III. Did the same with a Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 and a Canon 24-105m f/4 on the same ...


1

I find the question similar to "what advantages does shutter priority mode have over automatic mode?" The answer is, plenty! For example, this picture was taken with shutter priority mode to capture motion blur: I wanted motion blur so I selected 1/20 s exposure. I also wanted the background to be sharp. Fortunately, I have a 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens. At ...


1

TLDR summary: so the photographer can be intentional about exposure, rather than having camera software engineers decide for you. With anything other than manual, you are relying on the algorithm of your camera to decide your exposure. Even in Aperture Priority mode. This is bad because 99.9% of the time it doesn't match what you intended as a photographer. ...


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